Thursday, April 28th 2022

Targus Launches Two Thunderbolt 3 Docks Equipped with Exceptional Speed and Resolutions

Targus, a leader in laptop cases and mobile computing accessories, today announced the availability of two new Thunderbolt 3 docks, equipped with Thunderbolt speed for high-resolution graphics to meet the powerful demands of creative professionals and studios. "We've designed our DOCK215 and DOCK222 to meet the demanding needs of professional content creators," says David Dorantes, director of product marketing, Targus. "With features like Thunderbolt 3 speed, up to 8K resolution, dual-monitor support, and a compact design, both docks enable creatives to stay connected, powered, and productive."

The Thunderbolt 3 DV4K Docking Station with 85 W Power Delivery (DOCK215USZ) connects a laptop to dual 4K UHD monitors at 60hz or a single 8K HDR monitor at 30hz. Packed with ports, it comes with two USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C ports, as well as two USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A ports, and one USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A port to accommodate workspace peripherals like a mouse and keyboard, hard drive, and more. Its compact design also ensures it won't take up precious desk space for working essentials. It even comes equipped with a VESA bracket mounting provision, which allows for use of the Targus VESA Mount Bracket (ACX003GLZ - sold separately) to hold the dock behind the display for even greater space savings. DOCK215 retails for $287.99.
For even greater power delivery and more ports, the Thunderbolt 3 Docking Station with 96 W Power Delivery (DOCK222USZ) is equipped with Thunderbolt speed, high-resolution graphics, and multiple ports to meet the most demanding requirements of today's professional content creators and studios. It connects to dual 4K UHD monitors at 60hz or a single 8K HDR monitor at 30hz. It also offers multiple ports—two USB-C ports (one front-facing USB 3.2 Gen 2 and one rear-facing Thunderbolt 3 downstream port), five USB-A 3.2 Gen 1 ports (one which is fast-charging), and one SD Card port—to accommodate essential workspace peripherals like a mouse, keyboard, hard drive, and more. The DOCK222 ships with a Targus USB-C to DisplayPort Alternate Mode Adapter (ACA968GLX) to connect a second external DisplayPort monitor to MacBooks not supporting MST. It is also equipped with a VESA bracket mounting provision, allowing use of the Targus VESA Mount Bracket (ACX003GLZ - sold separately) to hold the dock behind the display for even greater space savings. DOCK222 retails for $402.99.
Source: Targus
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4 Comments on Targus Launches Two Thunderbolt 3 Docks Equipped with Exceptional Speed and Resolutions

#1
DeathtoGnomes
Although Thunderbolt 4 docks are available. I suppose it doesnt matter as much since there are no new ports that demand it.
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#2
trsttte
DeathtoGnomesAlthough Thunderbolt 4 docks are available. I suppose it doesnt matter as much since there are no new ports that demand it.
Most (if not all) the differences between Thunderbolt 3 and 4 is clarifying and making stuff that before was optional required so that it's possible to know what to expect when you look for something with thunderbolt (for example, TB4 requires 4 lanes and 40gbps, no more 2 lanes cheaters or reduced bandwith)
Posted on Reply
#3
AnarchoPrimitiv
trsttteMost (if not all) the differences between Thunderbolt 3 and 4 is clarifying and making stuff that before was optional required so that it's possible to know what to expect when you look for something with thunderbolt (for example, TB4 requires 4 lanes and 40gbps, no more 2 lanes cheaters or reduced bandwith)
That 40Gbps, is a misunderstanding, it's more correct to say that it requires PCIe 3.0x4 (32Gbps) and the remaining 8Gbps comes from displayport/video transmission coupled into the protocol, because there's actually no thunderbolt 3 connection in which the entire 40Gbps can be utilized by an external SSD or eGPU for example, for anyone who might not know.

On another note, with PCIe 5.0 set to be standard on new desktop platforms with the release of Zen4, isn't it time that Thunderbolt upgrade to at least PCIe 4.0x4? Though it'd be cooler and better for marketing if it was called Thunderbolt 5 and utilized PCIe 5.0x4 (128Gbps). If it was at least 4.0x4 (64Gbps and equivocal to 3.0x8) this would get pretty close to having eGPUs as good as in desktop applications and would provide for the pending release of displayport 2.0. Plus, who knows what new applications and external devices could be devised with all that available bandwidth...definitely could see more docks with integrated NVMe SSD storage, HDMI 2.1, USB4, etc
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#4
trsttte
AnarchoPrimitivOn another note, with PCIe 5.0 set to be standard on new desktop platforms with the release of Zen4, isn't it time that Thunderbolt upgrade to at least PCIe 4.0x4? Though it'd be cooler and better for marketing if it was called Thunderbolt 5 and utilized PCIe 5.0x4 (128Gbps). If it was at least 4.0x4 (64Gbps and equivocal to 3.0x8) this would get pretty close to having eGPUs as good as in desktop applications and would provide for the pending release of displayport 2.0. Plus, who knows what new applications and external devices could be devised with all that available bandwidth...definitely could see more docks with integrated NVMe SSD storage, HDMI 2.1, USB4, etc
In theory that's all good and dandy but I doubt USB-C as is now could carry that ammount of data without some very specific cables and/or some design changes. For the 40gbps alone there's already a need for active cables for anything longer than 2 meters (if certified for TB4, TB3 cables needed to be active from half a meter up).
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Jun 25th, 2022 03:33 EDT change timezone

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