Monday, May 2nd 2022

Optoma Introduces Versatile Smart 4K UHD Home Entertainment Projector

Optoma, the No. 1 4K UHD projection brand worldwide and the No. 1 DLP projection brand in the Americas and worldwide, continues its commitment to deliver the best home entertainment experience with the debut of the Optoma UHD55 smart true 4K UHD projector. Immerse yourself in a true 4K UHD cinematic experience at home through stunning, larger-than-life images with the UHD55. Featuring 3,600 lumens of brightness, you can enjoy your movies with the lights on or in the evening. With an impressive 1,200,000:1 contrast ratio, the UHD55 is High Dynamic Range (HDR) and HLG compatible for brighter whites and deeper blacks resulting in brilliant color with 97% DCI-P3 coverage in wide color gamut mode with shutter enabled, enhancing the overall viewing experience.

For gaming enthusiasts, the UHD55 offers a built-in Enhanced Gaming Mode for an incredibly fast response time of 16 ms in 4K at 60 Hz and 4 ms in 1080p at 240 Hz, ensuring smooth and immersive gaming experiences. Additionally, the UHD55 offers smart tech integration features throughout, including seamless integration into smart homes with Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant compatibility. Offering a sleek and compact design, the UHD55 provides versatile projection and easy content sharing at the touch of a button with the Creative Cast app which allows you to wirelessly display images, documents, and videos from up to four devices.
"We remain committed to meeting the demands for flexible display solutions which have expanded in the home entertainment market during the pandemic. The new Optoma UHD55 combines top-of-the-line features to meet the needs of home entertainment enthusiasts, delivering on image quality, performance and functionality - all at a market-leading price," said Allen Pestell, Head of Product Marketing, Optoma.

Built for hassle-free installation, the UHD55 offers vertical lens shift, 1.3x zoom and 3x3 warping to ensure seamless set-ups in any setting. The UHD55 also features two HDMI 2.0 inputs for connectivity to the latest 4K UHD devices, as well as RS-232 connectivity.

Additional features of the Optoma UHD55 include:
  • Resolution: 3480 x 2160 True 4K UHD
  • Brightness: 3,600 ANSI lumens
  • Contrast Ratio: 1,200,000:1
  • Light source: Lamp, up to 15,000 hours of operation in Dynamic Black mode
  • HDR and HLG compatible
  • Wide Color Gamut support: 97% DCI-P3
  • Smart home compatibility with Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and IFTTT compatibility
  • 1.3x optical zoom
  • Horizontal and vertical keystone correction, vertical lens shift and 3x3 warping
The Optoma UHD55 is available for purchase in the United States for an estimated street price of $1,799 and in Canada for $2,599.
Source: Optoma
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12 Comments on Optoma Introduces Versatile Smart 4K UHD Home Entertainment Projector

#2
Punkenjoy
Ferrum MasterHDR compatible? :D
It say it in the spec so I suppose.


The thing is how good it is. That might be my go to choice for my basement projection room to replace a cheap 300$ amazon 1080p projector that is ok, but kinda loud and not that bright. Just bought something cheap that i could bring outside to do some night film watching during pandemic.

Initial review seems good but i prefer to see a bit more before spending that much money

www.passionhomecinema.fr/blog/index.php/19/04/2022/test-optoma-uhd55-lavis-de-gregory/
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#3
Ferrum Master
PunkenjoyInitial review seems good but i prefer to see a bit more before spending that much money

www.passionhomecinema.fr/blog/index.php/19/04/2022/test-optoma-uhd55-lavis-de-gregory/
I have a 7 years old Benq 1070... that sucker simply doesn't die... also it is still not that bad picture wise. The moral is... well, the decent brands tend to serve much longer.

But on the serious note, Optoma is my 1st pick on the list when time will come. But a decent HDR is a serious must.
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#4
Valantar
Gotta love that PR photo - that guy on the left is sitting almost directly in front of the projector. That will certainly make for a good gaming experience!
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#5
Steevo
I miss my projector, bulb was as expensive as a new one, and 4K TVs are cheaper now. But the theater experience with a huge screen.
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#6
Punkenjoy
Ferrum MasterI have a 7 years old Benq 1070... that sucker simply doesn't die... also it is still not that bad picture wise. The moral is... well, the decent brands tend to serve much longer.

But on the serious note, Optoma is my 1st pick on the list when time will come. But a decent HDR is a serious must.
Indeed, good reputation brand generally last longer.

On the one i have, i watched few review before buying it. I would say it's quite good for the price. The thing is I use it in my Gazebo outdoor in the summers. Overtime we started using the home cinema more and more and we barely use the TV in the living room anymore. I just want now a permanent setup that I won't dismantle during summer.

I am still surprised that although it require a bit more work, it's still incredibly cheaper for large screen if you can have a dark room versus a TV. A 120 inch TV is quite expensive.
Posted on Reply
#7
Ferrum Master
PunkenjoyA 120 inch TV is quite expensive.
To fair, it just because of the demand. Also realistically in the world there are not that many people having a spare 120inch wall in the first place. A place for small telly for brainwash channels, yeah sure.

I am sporting 135inches, but actually the best upgrade would be put some side and top pure black curtains to absorb reflections in bright scenes and boost overall contrast and black levels. Either rollable sausage ones or just leave some hooks and attach them when needed.
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#8
Valantar
Most people would balk at having a giant black thing fill up a full wall in their living room, which a 120" LCD or OLED would. A projection screen can be rolled away and made quite inconspicuous, and even when unrolled is likely white or light grey, making it far less visually dominating in the room. As for costs, you can likely get a single 120" panel per wafer on the best production processes currently (with maybe a few much smaller panels along the sides), which inherently makes them expensive - not only through increased production and materials costs, but decreased yields and slower production, and to compensate for profits that would have come from making that same wafer into several more normal sized TVs.
Posted on Reply
#9
Punkenjoy
The market for home cinema using projector with +100 inch screen size is bigger than you think. It's not for people living in an apartment for sure, but when you have a home and a dedicated room, it's quite easy to dedicate a full wall to a big screen.

If TV were affordable, they would be less of a market for projector as it's much easier to setup. but paying 10K+ for just the TV is a bit much for a lot of people. With a good screen and a decent projector, you can get amazing results for way less than that.
Posted on Reply
#10
Ferrum Master
ValantarMost people would balk at having a giant black thing fill up a full wall in their living room, which a 120" LCD or OLED would. A projection screen can be rolled away and made quite inconspicuous, and even when unrolled is likely white or light grey, making it far less visually dominating in the room. As for costs, you can likely get a single 120" panel per wafer on the best production processes currently (with maybe a few much smaller panels along the sides), which inherently makes them expensive - not only through increased production and materials costs, but decreased yields and slower production, and to compensate for profits that would have come from making that same wafer into several more normal sized TVs.
Well IMHO there are only issues moving that stuff around, it would work as quad 4K screen, making it hard to drive. Haven't heard problems about yield issues in that department, every bit gets chopped and used.

But imagine the moral... you spend so much money on 120 LCD/OLED... watches Movies in anamopric ~21:9... large portion of the screen shows only black bars xD.
Posted on Reply
#11
Valantar
Ferrum MasterWell IMHO there are only issues moving that stuff around, it would work as quad 4K screen, making it hard to drive. Haven't heard problems about yield issues in that department, every bit gets chopped and used.
The chance of production errors scales with area, just like with silicon lithography, so a larger panel will always have a significantly higher chance of pixel defects. That's a huge part of why prices rise so exponentially - if you're unlucky you end up with the vast majority of a full substrate sheet being unusable. And yes, every bit of the sheet gets used, but you can't just carve new panels out of a defective one - not only would you cut down resolution, but you'd end up with pixel orientation issues and other stuff. It can absolutely be done, but making that into a viable product is iffy at best.

Btw, are you saying that these large panels actually have an 8k-like subpixel resolution despite being 4k? AFAIK, no panels like this are sold as anything but native resolution, though I guess that might not be true for the really huge ones. Comparing regular TVs, the 55, 65, and 75" versions just have different pixel pitches and (at times) subpixel sizes, with the subpixel count being the same.
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#12
Skylinestar
Disappointed that despite being the top of the line projector, there is no horizontal and little vertical lens shift.
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Jun 30th, 2022 13:19 EDT change timezone

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