Thursday, May 19th 2022

GeIL Launches Actively Cooled DDR5 Memory with Dual RGB Fans

GeIL, is excited to announce the market launch of its EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory kits providing high-frequency modules ranging from 4800 MHz to 6600 MHz and available in large kit capacities of 32 GB to 64 GB. The unique heatspreader design features active cooling and fascinating RGB lighting effects and is available in titanium gray or glacier white color themes.

GeIL EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory offers unparalleled memory performance and stability to meet the intensive demand of hardcore gamers and overclockers across Intel's latest platforms. GeIL has crafted a break-through cooling solution for EVO V modules that integrates a stunning RGB light bar and two micro cooling fans into a single molded aluminium heatshield. Most importantly, the physical height of the heatspreader allows it to be compatible with most CPU coolers on the market without any mechanical interference.
The heatspreader comes in two color options, titanium gray and glacier white,perfectly matching the most popular color themes of high-end motherboards and desktop PC components.Two cooling fans are located in the heatshield's upper right and left corners and provide extra airflow to keep the modules operating in an ideal thermal range. The dual-fan cooling heatshield can provide approximately 45% more thermal dissipation than traditional.

The exceptional architecture of the DDR5 memory is based on locked/unlocked PMIC (Power Management Integrated Circuit), which can provide threshold protection, synchronized voltage monitoring, smart voltage control, and power management to achieve a more comprehensive voltage control under normal and overclocked conditions.

Additionally, the on-chip ECC function enables active error correction to improve data integrity and enhance memory performance and stability.The GeIL EVO V supports the latest Intel XMP 3.0 profiles for precision and stability to auto overclocking, giving users more accessible access to customize and tweaking memory performance. Each module uses strictly sorted ICs and memory chips to offer excellent signal integrity and system performance reliability.

Availability

Backed by the limited lifetime warranty, the GeIL EVO V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory will be available in July in major retailers worldwide with speeds from 4800 MHz to 6600 MHz at 1.10 to 1.35 V and capacities from 32 GB to 64 GB.
Source: GeIL
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41 Comments on GeIL Launches Actively Cooled DDR5 Memory with Dual RGB Fans

#1
Lenne
S.T.A.R.S.
Nice, when a fan breaks, you have to RMA the whole module (or the whole kit). A separate bundled RAM cooler would've been a wiser choice IMO.
Posted on Reply
#2
Oblivion-330
"The dual-fan cooling heatshield can provide approximately 45% more thermal dissipation than traditional."

Is that 45% more than nothing cause those tiny fans will barely push any air.

I guess all you need to see is "RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory" to know whats up.
Posted on Reply
#3
ixi
But why? What is this nonsense... better buy front case fans...
Posted on Reply
#4
Lenne
S.T.A.R.S.
ixiBut why? What is this nonsense... better buy front case fans...
Or something like this:

Posted on Reply
#6
ixi
LenneOr something like this:

Better this than those small fans, but still I would say front...

Have there been cases now with ddr5 that they overheat or have problems due to heat?
Posted on Reply
#7
Lenne
S.T.A.R.S.
ixiBetter this than those small fans, but still I would say front...

Have there been cases now with ddr5 that they overheat or have problems due to heat?
Yeah, I agree that rather having a good airflow than using active memory cooling. Personally I don't see a reason for active cooling memory unless they're highly overclocked.
Posted on Reply
#8
Valantar
A DIMM uses, what, 2-3W, maybe 5W if overclocked? Let's assume 5W, and say that step-down converter is rather poorly designed and hits just 92% efficiency (which would be really bad for such a circuit - 94-96% is far more likely). That means it will output an additional 0,4W of heat. Unless those heatsinks have no contact at all, or you have absolutely zero airflow in your case, that is not a problem. Period. You don't need on-board fans for that.


Also, doesn't the airflow path here strongly imply that there isn't contact between the PMIC and heatsink? If there was, there wouldn't be a path for air to pass over it after all.
Posted on Reply
#9
Lenne
S.T.A.R.S.
ValantarA DIMM uses, what, 2-3W, maybe 5W if overclocked? Let's assume 5W, and say that step-down converter is rather poorly designed and hits just 92% efficiency (which would be really bad for such a circuit - 94-96% is far more likely). That means it will output an additional 0,4W of heat. Unless those heatsinks have no contact at all, or you have absolutely zero airflow in your case, that is not a problem. Period. You don't need on-board fans for that.


Also, doesn't the airflow path here strongly imply that there isn't contact between the PMIC and heatsink? If there was, there wouldn't be a path for air to pass over it after all.
If the RAM runs too hot, it can affect stability when overclocking. That's the only reason I see any usage for active RAM cooling.
Posted on Reply
#10
zlobby
When was the last time we needed active RAM cooling?
Posted on Reply
#13
KlauthWang
Well, I 'm wondering does this require additional cables. Just thinking of 4 additional cables for RAM kills me...
Posted on Reply
#14
Valantar
LenneIf the RAM runs too hot, it can affect stability when overclocking. That's the only reason I see any usage for active RAM cooling.
Well, sure, but these fans wouldn't seem to help much in that regard - nor is the marketing around "this cools down the PMIC" useful given its overall low heat output. Those extra fractions of a watt isn't making much of a difference, and if the flow path for the fans is underneath the heatsink, then either the heatsink is useless or the fans have a terrible airflow path. Either way, this is not a good solution.
Posted on Reply
#15
Chaitanya
LenneGood times, I remember those heatpipe heatsinks. Looks way better than modern RGB BS.
That was when Thermalright was on top with air cooling and had some really good options(proper heatsinks) for cooling almost every component of PC.
Posted on Reply
#16
Lenne
S.T.A.R.S.
KlauthWangWell, I 'm wondering does this require additional cables. Just thinking of 4 additional cables for RAM kills me...
My guess would be that they're wired to the DRAMs and they take their voltage from the modules. Just a guess.
Posted on Reply
#17
KlauthWang
LenneMy guess would be that they're wired to the DRAMs and they take their voltage from the modules. Just a guess.
If they can nail that, it would be much better. I still remember that the earlier version of Geil EVO X modules do have an additional cable just for the RGB lights.... yet they improved that later for good.
Posted on Reply
#18
Bomby569
ixiBut why? What is this nonsense... better buy front case fans...
depending on how you have things set up there could be a reservoir completely blocking the airflow path for example
Posted on Reply
#19
Valantar
LenneMy guess would be that they're wired to the DRAMs and they take their voltage from the modules. Just a guess.
I guess that's one way of ensuring the PMIC is putting out enough power to require active cooling :D:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#20
TheLostSwede
ValantarA DIMM uses, what, 2-3W, maybe 5W if overclocked? Let's assume 5W, and say that step-down converter is rather poorly designed and hits just 92% efficiency (which would be really bad for such a circuit - 94-96% is far more likely). That means it will output an additional 0,4W of heat. Unless those heatsinks have no contact at all, or you have absolutely zero airflow in your case, that is not a problem. Period. You don't need on-board fans for that.
Depends on the Voltage.
A single sided DDR5 DIMM seem to draw somewhere between 3.2 and 8 Watts when overclocked.
Posted on Reply
#21
m2geek
I can hear those DIMMs from here just from the image.
Posted on Reply
#22
Valantar
TheLostSwedeDepends on the Voltage.
A single sided DDR5 DIMM seem to draw somewhere between 3.2 and 8 Watts when overclocked.
Interesting! A bit higher than expected, but even at 8W (total, as that measurement includes conversion losses) with my assumed bad efficiency we're talking ~0.66W of conversion losses, so still not a ton. Also, with 8 RAM chips on board that would seem to place PMIC power losses around the same level as the power consumption of a single die, which is a handy piece of knowledge. I can definitely see the need for some airflow and somewhat decent heatsinks if your DIMMs consume 8W each though!
Posted on Reply
#23
TheLostSwede
ValantarInteresting! A bit higher than expected, but even at 8W (total, as that measurement includes conversion losses) with my assumed bad efficiency we're talking ~0.66W of conversion losses, so still not a ton. Also, with 8 RAM chips on board that would seem to place PMIC power losses around the same level as the power consumption of a single die, which is a handy piece of knowledge. I can definitely see the need for some airflow and somewhat decent heatsinks if your DIMMs consume 8W each though!
Just not the kind of fans that Geil went for, as they're going to start making loud screeching noises after three months.
Posted on Reply
#24
Blaylock
Anybody else notice the airflow in the middle image is all over the place? One fan rotates clockwise but the air comes out CCW. LOL Also this is a horrible idea.
Posted on Reply
#25
zlobby
TheLostSwedeJust not the kind of fans that Geil went for, as they're going to start making loud screeching noises after three months.
Good bearings for such small and fast fans are crazy expensive. Doubt they spent that much.
Posted on Reply
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