Thursday, June 16th 2022

LG Announces Pricing and Availability of DualUp Monitor

LG Electronics USA announced pricing and availability of the new 28-inch LG DualUp Monitor (28MQ780), a first-of-its-kind display within the monitor market. It features a Nano IPS display with a unique 16:18 aspect ratio that frees up one's desk without giving up the screen space of a double monitor. LG's DualUp monitor is available for purchase now at LG.com and select LG-authorized dealers for a retail price of $699.

A CES 2022 Innovation Award winner, the LG DualUp Monitor is a product that revolutionizes the way creators and developers work, combining stacked dual monitors to create a single one. The innovative Square Double QHD (2,560 x 2,880) resolution monitor offers the same screen real estate as two 21.5-inch displays and has a vertical split view function that lets users see more in one glance, making it a multitasking powerhouse. It offers peerless picture quality, powerful performance, customizability, and most of all convenience.
The monitor's Nano IPS panel also enhances the visual experience for work and entertainment by making color expressions more accurate and richer. Users can enjoy HDR content on this monitor with the DCI-P3 98% color gamut that delivers detailed, accurate, and vibrant color expression. HDR delivers a more dramatic, dynamic, and immersive visual experience.

Boosting productivity, the LG DualUp Monitor elevates user comfort with the ultra-adjustable LG Ergo stand, which saves space as it clamps securely to most desks and tables. The Ergo Stand has evolved from the previous stand and includes enhanced tilting, swiveling, and extracting features. The wide range of positions it provides allows users to customize the height, angle, and depth of the monitor to the most ergonomic position for their body.

The DualUp supports USB Type-C with up to 90 W power delivery, allowing users to seamlessly connect to external devices, charge a laptop and more. Additionally, through its multiport for HDMI, DisplayPort and USB 3.0, users can connect multiple devices at once. The DualUp monitor supports 7Wx2ch stereo speakers with Waves MaxxAudio, delivering realistic sound effects and powerful audio. The speaker delivers massive bass that can boost the quality of what users watch, play, and create, and can maximize space usability for creators and developers.
Source: LG Electronics
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23 Comments on LG Announces Pricing and Availability of DualUp Monitor

#2
Dr_b_
is it possible to use the entire viewable screen area for one input device, or is this 2 monitors stacked, where inputs for one show up on the bottom half, and inputs for the other device show up on the top, or is it both?
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#3
Chrispy_
2560x1440 on a 21.5" is nasty. Why would you want two of those in a weirdo arrangement that doesn't really benefit from a zero-bezel solution anyway?
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#4
TheLostSwede
Dr_b_is it possible to use the entire viewable screen area for one input device, or is this 2 monitors stacked, where inputs for one show up on the bottom half, and inputs for the other device show up on the top, or is it both?
It's single input if you read the spec.
This might help.

Posted on Reply
#5
ZetZet
Chrispy_2560x1440 on a 21.5" is nasty. Why would you want two of those in a weirdo arrangement that doesn't really benefit from a zero-bezel solution anyway?
Why is it nasty? I would think this is mostly used for text and graphs, those tend to scale well so resolution doesn't really matter. I see it as just a slightly wider vertical monitor. Almost a square. I don't think LG decided to just put this out into the world, they probably had requests from some company and just decided to release it out into the wild too.
Posted on Reply
#6
Chrispy_
ZetZetWhy is it nasty? I would think this is mostly used for text and graphs, those tend to scale well so resolution doesn't really matter. I see it as just a slightly wider vertical monitor. Almost a square. I don't think LG decided to just put this out into the world, they probably had requests from some company and just decided to release it out into the wild too.
Nasty because of non-integer scaling to get a usable DPI. You're going to be using 150% scaling, most likely which is the worst thing ever for content creators who deal primarily with raster graphics.

The press release and use-case for this monitor isn't a contiguous image like ultrawide is useful for gaming or 2.35:1 movie content, it's for devs and movie editors who don't care about the bezel and are probably more interested in being able to angle the top monitor down so that it doesn't catch the glare off the ceiling lights and also so that the viewing angle is better.
Posted on Reply
#7
ZetZet
Chrispy_Nasty because of non-integer scaling to get a usable DPI. You're going to be using 150% scaling, most likely which is the worst thing ever for content creators who deal primarily with raster graphics.

The press release and use-case for this monitor isn't a contiguous image like ultrawide is useful for gaming or 2.35:1 movie content, it's for devs and movie editors who don't care about the bezel and are probably more interested in being able to angle the top monitor down so that it doesn't catch the glare off the ceiling lights and also so that the viewing angle is better.
Interesting that they market it like that. I thought they would be aiming mostly at the people who use vertical monitors. But I still believe that this panel is specially made for some weird use case and they're just re-using it here.
Posted on Reply
#8
Chrispy_
ZetZetInteresting that they market it like that. I thought they would be aiming mostly at the people who use vertical monitors. But I still believe that this panel is specially made for some weird use case and they're just re-using it here.
People who use vertical monitors usually want the 16:9 aspect in portrait, because they're dealing with portrait documents or phone content that is somewhere between 9:16 and 1:2 usually.

Having an unusual aspect ratio is fine; It's not for me, and it's not for video editors or content creators in the real world (my admin desk in the main office is sandwiched between the graphics department and the visualisation department) but nobody's forcing me to buy it and more choice on the market can only be a good thing.

I suspect LG don't really know who it's best aimed at which is why they picked some ill-fitting examples for their marketing but there will be people somewhere who are willing to pay for a niche product like this. I would guess that these are salvaged slices from large-format displays that had too many dead pixels or defects at one side, perhaps. I'm not really 100% sure if that's how LCD panel manufacture works, or whether it's only possible to determine the defects after it's been cut from motherglass and wired up to a display controller - Maybe someone more knowledgeable can confirm or correct me.
Posted on Reply
#9
thewan
Dr_b_is it possible to use the entire viewable screen area for one input device, or is this 2 monitors stacked, where inputs for one show up on the bottom half, and inputs for the other device show up on the top, or is it both?
TheLostSwedeIt's single input if you read the spec.
This might help.
Mr lost being lost again. IF you read the spec, it has 4 inputs. 2 HDMI, 1 DP and 1 USB C. Also those same specs also say it supports PBP, which if you don't know your monitor/tv terms, stands for picture by picture. This means it supports displaying two separate sources side by side.

For this monitor, as I was curious about it too so I read the manual, here is a shot of the part of the manual that describes the PBP function. The left and right descriptor is confusing but the picture below it clearly shows top and bottom though.:
(source - click owner's manual on the right hand side: www.lg.com/us/support/product/lg-28MQ780-B.AUS)
Posted on Reply
#10
Avlin
Actually half 5K (5120 x 2880) or half Quad QHD
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#11
InVasMani
It would make a filthy triple head setup.
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#12
neX
Opinions on getting 3 of these?
Posted on Reply
#13
Tanquen
Chrispy_People who use vertical monitors usually want the 16:9 aspect in portrait, because they're dealing with portrait documents or phone content that is somewhere between 9:16 and 1:2 usually.

Having an unusual aspect ratio is fine; It's not for me, and it's not for video editors or content creators in the real world (my admin desk in the main office is sandwiched between the graphics department and the visualisation department) but nobody's forcing me to buy it and more choice on the market can only be a good thing.

I suspect LG don't really know who it's best aimed at which is why they picked some ill-fitting examples for their marketing but there will be people somewhere who are willing to pay for a niche product like this. I would guess that these are salvaged slices from large-format displays that had too many dead pixels or defects at one side, perhaps. I'm not really 100% sure if that's how LCD panel manufacture works, or whether it's only possible to determine the defects after it's been cut from motherglass and wired up to a display controller - Maybe someone more knowledgeable can confirm or correct me.
No we want 16x10 displays. :)
Posted on Reply
#14
junglist724
Great for productivity, but a little pricey.
Posted on Reply
#15
TheLostSwede
thewanMr lost being lost again. IF you read the spec, it has 4 inputs. 2 HDMI, 1 DP and 1 USB C. Also those same specs also say it supports PBP, which if you don't know your monitor/tv terms, stands for picture by picture. This means it supports displaying two separate sources side by side.

For this monitor, as I was curious about it too so I read the manual, here is a shot of the part of the manual that describes the PBP function. The left and right descriptor is confusing but the picture below it clearly shows top and bottom though.:
(source - click owner's manual on the right hand side: www.lg.com/us/support/product/lg-28MQ780-B.AUS)
I guess you didn't understand the question, but instead you berate people.
Good job :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#16
R0H1T
Chrispy_Nasty because of non-integer scaling to get a usable DPI.
That's really only an issue on Windows, on Linux or even Mac no problems with that.
Posted on Reply
#17
Chrispy_
R0H1TThat's really only an issue on Windows, on Linux or even Mac no problems with that.
1.5 pixels per pixel is bad when you work with raster content, period. It doesn't matter what OS you're using...

I agree that the OS UI itself also looks like garbage at 150% in Windows, but that's a different complaint altogether. Half of the graphics team edit video on a Mac and you simply do not want interpolation blur in the content you are working on, ever.
Posted on Reply
#18
Tanquen
I know if you use any scaling some pop-ups and stuff look bad in Windows. Like they take a bitmap and then resize it. Why does scaling change anything when working with raster graphics? Do they just look a little soft with zoomed at 100%. I work with raster and vector graphics and it seems okay from that standpoint. I do hate the interface elements in Windows being goofy.

I mostly try to use the displays without any scaling, but I'm going to need reading glasses pretty soon. Even a 4K 32-in screen is a little on the two small side. And I was thinking of getting this display as a second portrait to replace my 30-in portrait, that is 16x10. I'd leave some heights, but it's still be taller than the 32-in 16x9. The 30-in 16x10 with the 256x1600 res really is a nice place to be without any scaling, but at the same time it would be nice to update the display and at the times I would like to fit some VMs on it better when I need to look at multiple at once for reference. I may get it. I'm not sure. It would make the two displays together a little too wide for my ergotron HD arm and I have an extension somewhere but I can't find it. Fun. Fun fun.
Posted on Reply
#19
Endeavour
Chrispy_1.5 pixels per pixel is bad when you work with raster content, period. It doesn't matter what OS you're using...

I agree that the OS UI itself also looks like garbage at 150% in Windows, but that's a different complaint altogether. Half of the graphics team edit video on a Mac and you simply do not want interpolation blur in the content you are working on, ever.
You know you can use Windows with 150% scaling but the work you do on photoshop and similar software still uses 100% scaling, right?

And that you can set your browser of choice to also use a different scaling (100%, 200%, etc)?

And that most apps and a lot of websites already have specific bitmap resources for 150% scaling (or 200% scaled down), and even interfaces with .svg elements?
Posted on Reply
#20
Camm
I'm tempted to use it in a horizontal layout over my 24:10 ultrawide.

The extra vertical height would be great for documents.
Posted on Reply
#21
lemonadesoda
I author and edit a lot of A4 portrait documents. This looks great. Would love to have better resolution though... reading an on-screen PDF is still far away from the quality/resolution of even the cheapest laser printer. We need moar rez

Another positive note: matte. Not glossy
Posted on Reply
#22
zlobby
lemonadesodaI author and edit a lot of A4 portrait documents. This looks great. Would love to have better resolution though... reading an on-screen PDF is still far away from the quality/resolution of even the cheapest laser printer. We need moar rez

Another positive note: matte. Not glossy
It would also be good for crypto traders nowadays.
Posted on Reply
#23
Veseleilo
neXOpinions on getting 3 of these?
That would be awesome. :) As an alternative to ultra wide, which i don't like due to small height. Not sure how much of a support in games it would get though.
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Jun 25th, 2022 23:13 EDT change timezone

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