News Posts matching #TU102

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NVIDIA's SUPER Tease Rumored to Translate Into an Entire Lineup Shift Upwards for Turing

NVIDIA's SUPER teaser hasn't crystallized into something physical as of now, but we know it's coming - NVIDIA themselves saw to it that our (singularly) collective minds would be buzzing about what that teaser meant, looking to steal some thunder from AMD's E3 showing. Now, that teaser seems to be coalescing into something amongst the industry: an entire lineup upgrade for Turing products, with NVIDIA pulling their chips up one rung of the performance chair across their entire lineup.

Apparently, NVIDIA will be looking to increase performance across the board, by shuffling their chips in a downward manner whilst keeping the current pricing structure. This means that NVIDIA's TU106 chip, which powered their RTX 2070 graphics card, will now be powering the RTX 2060 SUPER (with a reported core count of 2176 CUDA cores). The TU104 chip, which power the current RTX 2080, will in the meantime be powering the SUPER version of the RTX 2070 (a reported 2560 CUDA cores are expected to be onboard), and the TU102 chip which powered their top-of-the-line RTX 2080 Ti will be brought down to the RTX 2080 SUPER (specs place this at 8 GB GDDR6 VRAM and 3072 CUDA cores). This carves the way for an even more powerful SKU in the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER, which should be launched at a later date. Salty waters say the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER will feature and unlocked chip which could be allowed to convert up to 300 W into graphics horsepower, so that's something to keep an eye - and a power meter on - for sure. Less defined talks suggest that NVIDIA will be introducing an RTX 2070 Ti SUPER equivalent with a new chip as well.

EK Releases Vector RTX Series Blocks for ASUS ROG Strix Series Graphics Cards

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation water blocks for the popular ROG Strix GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing TU106, Turing TU104 and Turing TU102 graphics processor.

The inspiration for the new GPU block name "Vector" came from the sheer computing power of the graphics cards that are on the market today. Naming a water block "Full Cover" isn't enough these days, when the product is packed with unique features, such as these. The EK Vector Strix RTX water blocks are specially designed for multiple ROG Strix GeForce RTX Turing based graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful ROG graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

GIGABYTE Announces AORUS Turbo RTX 2080 Ti Graphics Card

After some leaks indicated that GIGABYTE was preparing a blower-style RTX 2080 Ti, the company has now officially unveiled it. The GIGABYTE AORUS Turbo RTX 2080 Ti feature a blower-style cooler with vapor-chamber, direct-touch technology trying to keep that monstrous, 754 mm² TU102 chip cool and quiet. Luckily, the chip is relatively power efficient, so the acoustic and thermal performance should be sufficient.

The GIGABYTE AORUS Turbo RTX 2080 Ti features a 1650 MHz core clock, and the other specs line up with what we've become used to with RTX 2080 Ti graphics cards (11 GB of GDDR6 memory at 14000 MHz). There's the typical 3x DisplayPort, 1x HDMI, and 1x USB Type-C for VirtuaLink. Expect this version of the RTX 2080 Ti to be near the bottom rung in terms of pricing, when it's available.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 and 2080 Mobile Could Make an Appearance at CES 2019

With NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 20-series having already released for desktops, it was only a matter of time until laptops got the RTX treatment as well. Current rumors are suggesting that Nvidia will officially launch their GeForce RTX 20-series mobility GPUs on January 6th at CES with the RTX 2070 and RTX 2070 Max-Q taking center stage. An embargo date of January 26th has also been set, with NVIDIA delaying their final release drivers until then. Meaning final performance results for the new mobile GPUs won't be available until after the embargo date, which should coincide with the general availability of RTX 20-series equipped laptops.

Along with the RTX 2070 and 2070 Max-Q mobility parts, the flagship RTX 2080 Max-Q which isn't expected at the show, is still in the works, with its TU104M 1eab device ID having been leaked earlier. The rest of the GeForce 20-series mobility GPUs are likely to use the GTX moniker if NVIDIA's desktop lineup is anything to go by; however, that is merely speculation at this point.

NVIDIA TITAN RTX Graphics Card Launching Soon

NVIDIA is ready with its new flagship halo consumer graphics card, the TITAN RTX. Several video bloggers such as LinusTechTips have apparently already been sampled with this card, and are probably under NDA not to reveal specifications. Given that "Turing" is the only NVIDIA architecture capable of RTX, NVIDIA could be building the TITAN RTX on the largest "TU102" silicon. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti does not max out this silicon, leaving NVIDIA room to do so with the TITAN RTX.

A maxed out "TU102" should feature 4,608 CUDA cores, 288 TMUs, 96 ROPs, in addition to 576 tensor cores and 72 RT cores. NVIDIA could also max out the 384-bit wide GDDR6 memory bus, and equip the TITAN RTX with 12 GB of video memory. Using 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory chips, NVIDIA can achieve 672 GB/s of memory bandwidth. The TITAN RTX card itself looks similar to the RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition graphics card, but with an illuminated "TITAN" logo on top. The card still draws power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors, and it's likely that NVIDIA is using the same PCB, perhaps with additional capacitors. Pricing and availability is anyone's guess. Given that the RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition was launched at $1,200, we agree with some of our community members' speculation that $1,800-2,000 doesn't seem implausible.

Update Dec 3: The Titan RTX has launched now for $2,499.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 Up for Pre-Order, Full TU102 at $6,300

NVIDIA opened up its "Turing" based Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 graphics cards up for pre-order on its website. The RTX 6000 is priced at USD $6,300, and a quantity limitation of 5 per customer is in place. The RTX 5000, on the other hand, is priced at $2,300, and is out of stock at the time of this writing. The RTX 6000 maxes out the TU102 silicon with 4,608 CUDA cores, 576 Tensor cores, 72 RT cores, and is armed with 24 GB of GDDR6 memory, across the chip's full 384-bit memory bus width, making it the cheapest graphics card that maxes out the silicon, unless NVIDIA comes up with a "TITAN X Turing." The Quadro series comes with an enterprise feature-set and certifications for major content-creation applications not available on the GeForce series.

The Quadro RTX 5000, on the other hand, maxes out the TU104 silicon with 3,072 CUDA cores, 384 Tensor cores, 48 RT cores, and 16 GB of GDDR6 memory across the chip's 256-bit wide memory interface. The $10,000 RTX 8000, which isn't open to pre-orders yet, arms the TU102 with a whopping 48 GB of memory, and higher clocks than the RTX 6000. NVIDIA debuted the "Turing" graphics architecture with the Quadro RTX series a week before the new GeForce RTX 20-series.

NVIDIA Segregates Turing GPUs; Factory Overclocking Forbidden on the Cheaper Variant

While working on GPU-Z support for NVIDIA's RTX 20-series graphics cards, we noticed something curious. Each GPU model has not one, but two device IDs assigned to it. A device ID is a unique identification that tells Windows which specific device is installed, so it can select and load the relevant driver software. It also tells the driver, which commands to send to the chip, as they vary between generations. Last but not least, the device ID can be used to enable or lock certain features, for example in the professional space. Two device IDs per GPU is very unusual. For example, all GTX 1080 Ti cards, whether reference or custom design, are marked as 1B06. Titan Xp on the other hand, which uses the same physical GPU, is marked as 1B02. NVIDIA has always used just one ID per SKU, no matter if custom-design, reference or Founders Edition.

We reached out to industry sources and confirmed that for Turing, NVIDIA is creating two device IDs per GPU to correspond to two different ASIC codes per GPU model (for example, TU102-300 and TU102-300-A for the RTX 2080 Ti). The Turing -300 variant is designated to be used on cards targeting the MSRP price point, while the 300-A variant is for use on custom-design, overclocked cards. Both are the same physical chip, just separated by binning, and pricing, which means NVIDIA pretests all GPUs and sorts them by properties such as overclocking potential, power efficiency, etc.

NVIDIA TU106 Chip Support Added to HWiNFO, Could Power GeForce RTX 2060

We are all still awaiting how NVIDIA's RTX 2000 series of GPUs will fare in independent reviews, but that has not stopped the rumor mill from extrapolating. There have been alleged leaks of the RTX 2080 Ti's performance and now we see HWiNFO add support to an unannounced NVIDIA Turing microarchitecture chip, the TU106. As a reminder, the currently announced members in RTX series are based off TU102 (RTX 2080 Ti), and TU104 (RTX 2080, RTX 2070). It is logical to expect a smaller die for upcoming RTX cards based on NVIDIA's history, and we may well see an RTX 2060 using the TU106 chip.

This addition to HWiNFO is to be taken with a grain of salt, however, as they have been wrong before. Even recently, they had added support for what, at the time, was speculated to be NVIDIA Volta microarchitecture which we now know as Turing. This has not stopped others from speculating further, however, as we see 3DCenter.org give their best estimates on how TU106 may fare in terms of die size, shader and TMU count, and more. Given that TSMC's 7 nm node will likely be preoccupied with Apple iPhone production through the end of this year, NVIDIA may well be using the same 12 nm FinFET process that TU102 and TU104 are being manufactured on. This mainstream GPU segment is NVIDIA's bread-and-butter for gross revenue, and so it is possible we may see an announcement with even retail availability towards the end of Q4 2018 to target holiday shoppers.

EK Releasing EK-Vector RTX 2000 Series Water Blocks

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation of high-performance water blocks for the newly announced NVIDIA GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing TU104 and Turing TU102 graphics processor. The inspiration for the new GPU block name "Vector" came from the sheer computing power of the graphics cards that are on the market today. Naming a water block "Full Cover" isn't enough these days, when the product is packed with unique features, such as these.

The EK Vector RTX water block is specially designed for multiple NVIDIA GeForce RTX Turing based reference design graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your beefy graphics card into a minimalist, elegant piece of a hardware. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to reveal the graphics card model, visible from the side.

NVIDIA "TU102" RT Core and Tensor Core Counts Revealed

The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is indeed based on an ASIC codenamed "TU102." NVIDIA was referring to this 775 mm² chip when talking about the 18.5 billion-transistor count in its keynote. The company also provided a breakdown of its various "cores," and a block-diagram. The GPU is still laid out like its predecessors, but each of the 72 streaming multiprocessors (SMs) packs RT cores and Tensor cores in addition to CUDA cores.

The TU102 features six GPCs (graphics processing clusters), which each pack 12 SMs. Each SM packs 64 CUDA cores, 8 Tensor cores, and 1 RT core. Each GPC packs six geometry units. The GPU also packs 288 TMUs and 96 ROPs. The TU102 supports a 384-bit wide GDDR6 memory bus, supporting 14 Gbps memory. There are also two NVLink channels, which NVIDIA plans to later launch as its next-generation multi-GPU technology.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti TU102 Die-size Revealed

Here are some of the first pictures of NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 2080 Ti ASIC, probably codenamed "TU102." GamersNexus took a ruler to this chip, and discovered that it's one of the biggest non-storage chips in existence. The rectangular die measures 31 mm x 25 mm, or 775 mm². The package has no IHS, but a metal brace along the periphery of the fiberglass substrate distributes mounting pressure from the cooler. NVIDIA is building the "Turing" family of GPUs on TSMC 12 nm FinFET node.

COLORFUL Adds NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti & RTX 2080 Into AD Series

Colorful Technology Company Limited, professional manufacturer of graphics cards, motherboards and high-performance storage solutions, adds two new cards into its AD series, which were named as iGame GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Advanced OC and iGame GeForce RTX 2080 Advanced OC.

The new NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs have reinvented graphics and set a new bar for performance. Powered by the new NVIDIA Turing GPU architecture and the revolutionary NVIDIA RTX platform, the new graphics cards bring together real-time ray tracing, artificial intelligence, and programmable shading. This is not only a whole new way to experience games - this is the ultimate PC gaming experience.

The new GPUs were unveiled at a special NVIDIA two-day event called the "GeForce Gaming Celebration" which kicked off on August 20th at the Palladium in Cologne, Germany ahead of Gamescom 2018.

GALAX Confirms Specs of RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti

GALAX spilled the beans on the specifications of two of NVIDIA's upcoming high-end graphics cards, as it's becoming increasingly clear that the company could launch the GeForce RTX 2080 and the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti simultaneously, to convince GeForce "Pascal" users to upgrade. The company's strategy appears to be to establish 40-100% performance gains over the previous generation, along with a handful killer features (such as RTX, VirtuaLink, etc.,) to trigger the upgrade-itch.

Leaked slides from GALAX confirm that the RTX 2080 will be based on the TU104-400 ASIC, while the RTX 2080 Ti is based on the TU102-300. The RTX 2080 will be endowed with 2,944 CUDA cores, and a 256-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, holding 8 GB of memory; while the RTX 2080 Ti packs 4,352 CUDA cores, and a 352-bit GDDR6 memory bus, with 11 GB of memory. The memory clock on both is constant, at 14 Gbps. The RTX 2080 has its TDP rated at 215W, and draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors; while the RTX 2080 Ti pulls 250W TDP, drawing power through a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors. You also get to spy GALAX' triple-fan non-reference cooling solution in the slides below.
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