Saturday, January 9th 2010

ASUS Rampage III Extreme Smiles for the Camera

One of ASUS' premier offers for this year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) event is a new high-end socket LGA-1366 motherboard, the Republic of Gamers (ROG) Rampage III Extreme. The board succeeds the Rampage II Extreme which launched over an year ago along with Intel's then new Core i7 series processors. The new model based on the Intel X58 Express + ICH10R chipset, comes with four well spaced out PCI-Express 2.0 x16 slots, a new set of overclocking enhancements such as the ROG connect which lets you control the motherboard's overclocking from any Bluetooth and Java enabled mobile phone, SATA 6 Gb/s and USB 3.0 connectivity using ASUS' innovative PCI-Express 2.0 bridge implementation, and a more powerful CPU VRM to keep the board stable with bleeding-edge settings.

The board features an enhanced CPU VRM which is now powered by two 8-pin ATX connectors apart from two 4-pin Molex connectors. Some of these could be redundant and needed only for electrical stability. The CPU and memory power circuitry makes use of super-ML capacitors for cleaner power delivery. Voltage readouts are located next to the DIMM slots for accessibility. The motherboard makes use of slimmer component heatsinks that look to be made of the ceramic composite which the TUF Sabertooth P55 motherboard uses.
Expansion slots include four PCI-Express 2.0 x16 (electrical x16, NC, x16, NC; or x8, x8, x8, x8) depending on how they are populated, and one each of PCI-Express 2.0 x4 and PCI. A PLX ExpressLane PEX 8613 bridge chip is used to give out up to 12 PCI-Express 2.0 lanes (using three ports) connecting to the southbridge using its PCI-Express 1.1 x4 link, so that any PCI-E 2.0 device can make use of that amount of bandwidth. Devices connected to it include a Marvell 2-port SATA 6 Gb/s controller, and an NEC 2-port USB 3.0 controller. Connectivity includes 8-channel audio with optical SPDIF output, gigabit Ethernet, Bluetooth, eSATA, USB 2.0 and 3.0. The Rampage III Extreme should come out in Q1, just in time for Intel's 32 nm Core i7 980X six-core processor based on the Westmere architecture.Source: Tom's Hardware
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105 Comments on ASUS Rampage III Extreme Smiles for the Camera

#1
pantherx12
Thank you for the better pics!

Glad to see they have 775 mounting holes and 1336, MORE boards need to do this.

Infact no idea why intel bothered to make the mounting holes different on 1336 in the first place.
Posted on Reply
#2
Fitseries3
Eleet Hardware Junkie
pantherx12 said:

Infact no idea why intel bothered to make the mounting holes different on 1336 in the first place.
1366 requires more mounting pressure than 775 due to larger surface area of the IHS.
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#3
pantherx12
How does that apply more pressure?
Posted on Reply
#4
Chicken Patty
WCG Moderator
The boar def. looks very sexy :rockout:
Posted on Reply
#5
Fitseries3
Eleet Hardware Junkie
pantherx12 said:
How does that apply more pressure?
larger mounting area can provide more pressure and spread it accross a larger area.

think of this...

take a nail and push it into the ground with 1000pounds of pressure. what happens?

now take a 3inch round cylinder and do the same.

the smaller one sinks right into the ground but the larger one spreads pressure evenly.

idk if i explained that properly but you may get what im saying.
Posted on Reply
#6
pantherx12
I don't think that's right fit, after all your bolting the sink down most of the time, and you do those bolts up all the way they go ( or I do with my stuff) so they would reach the same level of pressure regardless of mounting hole position)


Also from your explanation the wider hole spacing would apply less pressure to a single point, which is what you don't want, you want a lot of pressure just on the CPU, which makes the closest holes the optimal choice, means you have more room for components.



I tested both sets on the blooodrage before I killed it, on my 3503 it made no difference in idle or load.


Any one willing to test this out on their board with 2 sets of mount holes?
Posted on Reply
#7
Kantastic
Fitseries3 said:
larger mounting area can provide more pressure and spread it accross a larger area.

think of this...

take a nail and push it into the ground with 1000pounds of pressure. what happens?

now take a 3inch round cylinder and do the same.

the smaller one sinks right into the ground but the larger one spreads pressure evenly.

idk if i explained that properly but you may get what im saying.
I didn't get any of that, maybe I'm retarded but it just doesn't make any sense to me. :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#8
Animalpak
This time is very overclocking addicted, all in dual extra power connectors to the cpu and mainboard, sure those are not the final heatsinks.
Posted on Reply
#9
Chicken Patty
WCG Moderator
Kantastic said:
I didn't get any of that, maybe I'm retarded but it just doesn't make any sense to me. :ohwell:
I get what FIT is trying to say, I am just not sure if it applies to what we were talking about the larger IHS and more spread out mounting holes.
Posted on Reply
#10
pantherx12
I fixed my post as it was hard to read before.

Make sense now guys?
Posted on Reply
#11
Jstn7477
Fitseries3 said:
http://wd.ch-img.com/1100781-asus-rampage-iii-extreme.jpg

http://wd.ch-img.com/1100791-asus-rampage-iii-extreme-2.jpg

http://wd.ch-img.com/1100801-asus-rampage-iii-extreme-3.jpg

http://wd.ch-img.com/1100811-asus-rampage-iii-extreme-4.jpg

http://wd.ch-img.com/1100821-asus-rampage-iii-extreme-5.jpg

http://wd.ch-img.com/1100831-asus-rampage-iii-extreme-6.jpg
There's a THIRD Molex connector on the bottom edge. :eek:

Also, the amount of supplementary chips on this board is ridiculous. I counted 13 in the lower half, not including the BIOS chips, the chipset and the 10 PCIe switches and whatever else I missed.
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#12
Kantastic
So much for cable management :laugh:.
Posted on Reply
#13
theubersmurf
btarunr said:
There's tons of value to that. It's better than EVBot or the OC Palm, is wireless, and relatively cheaper (OC Palm or EVBot add to the motherboard's cost).
Maybe, I'm not one to use devices like that anyway, I tend to overclock directly in the BIOS via the keyboard. But I guess if you go in for that kind of thing, maybe it's useful, being that there's no specialty instrument manufactured I suppose that's less expensive. It still seems to me gimmicky and honestly pretty silly. Can these devices be used to adjust speed/voltages while the OS is running? I guess if the answer is yes than it may be pretty useful.
Posted on Reply
#14
Assassin48
theubersmurf said:
Maybe, I'm not one to use devices like that anyway, I tend to overclock directly in the BIOS via the keyboard. But I guess if you go in for that kind of thing, maybe it's useful, being that there's no specialty instrument manufactured I suppose that's less expensive. It still seems to me gimmicky and honestly pretty silly. Can these devices be used to adjust speed/voltages while the OS is running? I guess if the answer is yes than it may be pretty useful.
the evbot is real-time overclocking if i remember correctly, same with the Asus Rog controller thing.

I can see this being useful like when doing 3d benching
Posted on Reply
#15
DRDNA
pantherx12 said:
To be honest, I don't see the point of an extra cable in the first place, sure the power is more evenly distributed ( supposedly) but presuming you've got a non shit psu you should be golden with 1 connection always.

to put an additional one on, AND two molex power connection just screams MARKETING to me.

" LOOK AT ME AND MY POWER"

I'm finding a lot of motherboards boring recently, getting bigger and flashier rather then working on the things that matter.

Component layout for example D:
This is an overclocking and benching board....not for just any ole desktop.:toast:
Posted on Reply
#16
pantherx12
DRDNA said:
This is an overclocking and benching board....not for just any ole desktop.:toast:
I know but a single 8 pin cable supplies enough power, and THEN some even to a heavily over clocked CPU, I sincerely doubt this will make any major difference.

Unless they plan on running 5 volts through a cpu at once.
Posted on Reply
#17
InnocentCriminal
Resident Grammar Amender
As always I like the red & black colour scheme. However, I fuckin' hate 4 pin Molex as it is, last thing I would want to do is plug several of them into my stylish new motherboard.

I really hope the 4 pin Molex connector dies.

:shadedshu
Posted on Reply
#18
pantherx12
You don't have to IC, you use either the 8 pin "regular" connection or the other, its if you don't have a psu with two sets of mobo power cable.

I had a 939 board that had the same, only with 1 of each, not 2 of each.
Posted on Reply
#19
Fitseries3
Eleet Hardware Junkie
InnocentCriminal said:
As always I like the red & black colour scheme. However, I fuckin' hate 4 pin Molex as it is, last thing I would want to do is plug several of them into my stylish new motherboard.

I really hope the 4 pin Molex connector dies.

:shadedshu
+1

everything needs to switch to sata power connectors
Posted on Reply
#20
SummerDays
bta, can you please clarify, does the mother board support two x16 slots or four?
Posted on Reply
#21
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
SummerDays said:
bta, can you please clarify, does the mother board support two x16 slots or four?
Two x16 or four x8.

Contrary to some reports on the internet, it doesn't look like there's an nForce 200 chip to me. There are two sets of external PCI-E lane switches.
Posted on Reply
#22
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
theubersmurf said:
Can these devices be used to adjust speed/voltages while the OS is running? I guess if the answer is yes than it may be pretty useful.
The whole idea behind on-the-fly overclocking is letting you handle clock speeds, voltages, and fan speeds with the OS running. The idea behind devices such as the ASUS OC Palm and EVGA EVBot is letting you do that right in the middle of a game / benchmark.

This is not gimmicky because all it takes for the manufacturer is to add a Bluetooth module and necessary hardware, and give you a Java app for your phone. So unlike OC Palm which shot the price of the P6T Deluxe by $50+ or the EVBot (which costs like $75), this isn't coming at a premium. If your phone has Bluetooth and can run Opera Mini (which is a Java app), then it can run the ROG Connect app.
Posted on Reply
#23
SteelSix
I like the PCI-E retention tab, looks like it's fingertip accessible from above or below an installed card (if not blocked by a cooler).

I have a Rampage II Extreme, no plans to upgrade but man that's a nice board. The low profile heatsinks are very sexy.
Posted on Reply
#24
adam99leit
Fitseries3 said:
larger mounting area can provide more pressure and spread it accross a larger area.

think of this...

take a nail and push it into the ground with 1000pounds of pressure. what happens?

now take a 3inch round cylinder and do the same.

the smaller one sinks right into the ground but the larger one spreads pressure evenly.

idk if i explained that properly but you may get what im saying.
i get what your saying ill explain it very very dumbly so people can get it easy ok think of it like this basically you have a cooler on your cpu with 4 levers extruding from it now since the 1366 chip and socket is so much bigger than the 775 chip and socket the cooler is also bigger so if you still used the 775 holes you would be reducing the size of the lever shorter lever=less tension so to compensate for that 1366 has wider mounting holes so that you keep the same size lever to keep correct amount of pressure on the chip hope that explains it better or at least in a different way hope it helps :toast:
Posted on Reply
#25
InnocentCriminal
Resident Grammar Amender
pantherx12 said:
You don't have to IC, you use either the 8 pin "regular" connection or the other, its if you don't have a psu with two sets of mobo power cable.

I had a 939 board that had the same, only with 1 of each, not 2 of each.
I know, but it's the fact if I needed to use them.
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