Wednesday, November 23rd 2011

Small, High Resolution Windows Laptops Coming In 2012 - Thanks To Apple

Love 'em or hate 'em, Apple has a habit of trend setting. When Apple released their original iPad, it had a meager low resolution 1024 x 768 resolution display which was scoffed at by many, yet it didn't stop it from being a runaway success. And the iPad 2 didn't improve on it, either – perhaps surprisingly, since the original formula worked so well. However, in early 2012 Apple plans to introduce its new Retina display equipped next generation iPads, offering a very high 2048 x 1536 resolution. On the 9.7" screen of an iPad, this would make the pixels all but invisible to anyone, except for those with the sharpest of 20-20 vision, giving the screen superb clarity and wow factor. These will be incorporated into its next generation iPads, which is expected to push the PC notebook market to use higher resolution displays too in order to remain competitive.

One indication of this, is that Acer and Asustek Computer are, according to Digitimes, both working with "panel makers AU Optronics (AUO) and Chimei Innolux (CMI) separately to develop a new generation of full HD notebook panels with a resolution of 1,928x1,080, according to industry sources." Digitimes' sources also state that these new ultrabooks are expected to go one sale around Jan-Feb 2012 at the earliest and that both manufacturers are optimistic that these small computers will sell well. For comparison, Asus's 11.6" UX21 ZenBook model is currently stuck at a 1366 x 768 resolution - barely better than an iPad 2. This resolution unfortunately, is also common with larger laptops, too. However, with the new display panels, this should hopefully jump to a much more useful Full HD, 1920 x 1080 resolution.

So, could this trend also rub off on desktop monitors, perhaps making 2048 x 1152 desktop monitors commonplace and inexpensive? It seems quite possible. The market has been stuck at a Full HD resolution for a while now and it's about time we saw a significant resolution jump.
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37 Comments on Small, High Resolution Windows Laptops Coming In 2012 - Thanks To Apple

#1
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
newtekie1 said:
A higher resolution works on the iPad because Apple can control how everything looks, and make everything bigger to fit the resolution better. Basically making sure that everything on the new screen will be roughly the same size as it was on the old screen, but everything will look sharper.

However, that doesn't work with Windows. You can raise the DPI settings, but it just ends up making things look screwed up, and some things just don't adhere to the DPI setting and remain so small you can't read them. Larger resolutions on small screens just doesn't work for most people on PCs. 1080p on an 11.5" screen would be impossible to use for most people, even on a 13.3" screen it would be pretty hard for most to use.
Yup, Windows is still working on the old bitmapped principle, which causes this. This is fine if you want a straight-up increase in desktop real estate, of course, but is useless for scaling and screen elements can look too tiny for some. Perhaps these hi-res displays will encourage Microsoft to implement a blend of the Apple way and the classic bitmap, in Windows 8?
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#2
npp
I read a very nice explanation @anandtech once for why most people need around 300dpi of resolution for text displayed in a range comparable with that when reading a book. I don't think there's much to argue about it, 300dpi (or ppi, if you wish) or something similar is useful for a smartphone or a tablet. So nothing against 2048 on an iPad3.

If one wants 150dpi on a desktop monitor, this yields something like 3072x1728 for a 24" widescreen. (I assume one would use a desktop monitor from twice the distance from a tablet).

It's clear that desktop monitors are lagging severely in resolution.
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#3
SetsunaFZero
i just say Toshiba 55ZL2 LCD with 3840x2160 resolution
u'll do ur pants if u see the price :laugh:
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#4
mediasorcerer
the more resolution the better as far as ive seen with screens, i had a 27" imac for a while late last year and although the gloss is bad in direct light, the 2650x1440 27" screen was very good to look at, better than 1080 for sure.
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#5
theJesus
The big reason I like high resolutions isn't just pixel-density or dot-pitch, it's screen real-estate. I like having the room to simultaneously view multiple windows, without needing multiple screens.
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#6
Lipton
"- Thanks to Apple"

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#7
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
what is the use if you cant even see the damned smaall pixels :p
Posted on Reply
#8
Inceptor
largon said:
Desktops have little use for higher pixel densities. Instead, focus should be put on lowering prices of larger screens, making proper RGB LED backlighting affordable and making more efficient panels with better colors.
Also, please ban glossy screens.
Higher pixel density is quite pleasant on the eyes, and makes things more crisp and 'real'. I wouldn't mind higher pixel densities on desktop monitors. I can see the pixels on my 21" 1080p monitor, it makes font scaling grainy and artificial as opposed to smooth and clean looking. It's a bit annoying.
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#9
largon
Oh well, I sit so that my eyes are about 1.2 meters (4 feet) away from the screen (30") so I guess our views and needs can differ somewhat.
¦p
Posted on Reply
#10
Inceptor
largon said:
Oh well, I sit so that my eyes are about 1.2 meters (4 feet) away from the screen (30") so I guess our views and needs can differ somewhat.
¦p
That's how far away my monitor is from me... and I can see pixellation and lack of definition. It doesn't matter what size your monitor is... a 30" 2560 x 1600 isn't any better pixel density than a 21" 1920 x 1080.
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#11
Fx
I am happy to hear about this progress. it is lame that it took Apple to do this because others just want to ride the bandwagon instead of pushing boundaries

good for Apple
Posted on Reply
#12
largon
OOookay... You're viewing a 21" screen from 4 feet away...
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