Wednesday, May 28th 2014

ASUS Announces the GeForce GTX Titan Z Dual GPU Graphics Card

ASUS today announced the GTX Titan Z, a brand new high performance graphics card with dual NVIDIA GeForce graphics processing units (GPUs) and GPU Tweak for real-time graphics tuning. Additional features like 12 GB GDDR5 memory and NVIDIA GPU Boost 2.0 provides users with the visual performance required for today's cutting-edge games.

Real-time graphics tuning for gamers
The high performance GTX Titan Z graphics card comes with GPU Tweak - an ASUS-exclusive interface that allows users to tune graphics parameters in real-time. This intuitive tool helps modify clock speeds and voltage levels, as well as cooling fan speeds to let gamers overclock the GTX Titan Z graphics card with confidence. The addition of an online streaming function lets users share their gaming action live with friends.

Dual GPUs and 12 GB onboard memory for multi-monitor configurations
The GTX Titan Z graphics card boasts two NVIDIA GeForce GPUs running at 876 MHz boost clock, 12 GB GDDR5 on-board memory, and a combined total of 5760 CUDA cores to give fast and smooth stutter-free visuals even when powering multi-monitor gaming rigs or 4K/UHD (ultra-high definition) monitors.

NVIDIA-boosted gaming performance
NVIDIA GPU Boost 2.0 provides users with an intelligent tool to actively monitor clock speed and ensure the GPU is constantly at peak performance to run games at their highest frame rates. GPU Boost 2.0 also offers new levels of customization, letting users set GPU temperature targets, overclocking, and unlocked voltages.

The GTX Titan Z is also NVIDIA G-Sync-ready to provide users with a fast and smooth gaming experience. NVIDIA G-Sync synchronizes display refresh rates to the NVIDIA GPUs to eliminate screen tearing and minimizes display stutter and input lag.

SPECIFICATIONS
GTXTITANZ-12GD5
  • Graphics Engine: NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN Z
  • Bus Standard: PCI Express 3.0
  • OpenGL: OpenGL 4.4
  • Video Memory: 12 GB GDDR5
  • GPU Boost Clock: 876 MHz
  • GPU Base Clock: 705 MHz
  • CUDA Cores: 5760
  • Memory Clock: 7000 MHz
  • Memory Interface: 768 bit
  • Output: 1 x Native DVI-I, 1 x Native DVI-D,1 x Native HDMI, 1 x Native DisplayPort 1.2
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12 Comments on ASUS Announces the GeForce GTX Titan Z Dual GPU Graphics Card

#1
bogami
Many are not even attributed the price. But it will be necessary manufactured cards to donate because either way they will not sell for the the minimum bid price 3000$
Posted on Reply
#2
Patriot
They Don't even list the base clock... and the boost clock is below the Titan Blacks base...
As predicted this will perform worse than two Titan Blacks whereas the 295x2 performs better than two 290x's.

That said... Now that the 290x has returned to sane pricing the 295x2 needs a drop. 1k-1.2k.
Posted on Reply
#3
Casecutter
Release Day with lots of Press Releases while No reviews? Is it just me or is the kind-of-for-telling the story!

I see Nvidia wanting to get (dump) the initial run they've made onto the channel / market and then be done with this with as little fan-fare as possible. That means giving out as few as possible to a couple of sympathetic reviewers and sell the rest to hopefully cover a good portion of their costs.
Posted on Reply
#4
Patriot
Casecutter said:
Release Day with lots of Press Releases while No reviews? Is it just me or is the kind-of-for-telling the story!

I see Nvidia wanting to get (dump) the initial run they've made onto the channel / market and then be done with this with as little fan-fare as possible. That means giving out as few as possible to a couple of sympathetic reviewers and sell the rest to hopefully cover a good portion of their costs.
A pair of 780ti's gets cleanly beat by the 295x2 ... this has lower clocks...
Curb Stomped by a card half the price is the current story.
Posted on Reply
#5
The Terrible Puddle
I like the backplate :)
Would be lovely if Nvidia included it with every card.
Posted on Reply
#6
GC_PaNzerFIN
Casecutter said:
Release Day with lots of Press Releases while No reviews? Is it just me or is the kind-of-for-telling the story!
It is pretty hard to write a review, when they don't even want to give press samples. Genious. PR hype card, without too many independent reviews. Nobody is going to BUY it for a review... :(
Posted on Reply
#7
64K
GC_PaNzerFIN said:
It is pretty hard to write a review, when they don't even want to give press samples. Genious. PR hype card, without too many independent reviews. Nobody is going to BUY it for a review... :(
I wonder if Nvidia didn't send out press samples because they knew that reputable tech sites like here would expose it for being a bad choice price wise unless a buyer needed something for work and gaming. They would basically be spending $$$ for bad reviews.
Posted on Reply
#8
HumanSmoke
bogami said:
Many are not even attributed the price. But it will be necessary manufactured cards to donate because either way they will not sell for the the minimum bid price 3000$
Are you trying to get into the Guinness Book of Records for cut and paste ?
Also from the Gigabyte PR...
bogami said:
Apparently no one will be crazy enough to buy them ! 3000$ -robbery !
...and from the Palit PR...
bogami said:
Apparently no one will be crazy enough to buy them ! 3000$ -robbery !
...and from the MSI PR...
bogami said:
Apparently no one will be crazy enough to buy them ! 3000$ -robbery !
Patriot said:
They Don't even list the base clock... and the boost clock is below the Titan Blacks base...
705MHz
Patriot said:
As predicted this will perform worse than two Titan Blacks whereas the 295x2 performs better than two 290x's.
There's no way on earth a 295X2 overclocks to 290X levels....safely.
Patriot said:
That said... Now that the 290x has returned to sane pricing the 295x2 needs a drop. 1k-1.2k.
It will likely remain at its price. The point of the 295X2 is to top the benchmark scores at review sites. I don't think AMD and it's partners actually want to sell the card in volume at a lower price since the AIO adds significantly to the BoM. The Titan Z has even less rationale for being in the model lineup - but then, I'm no great fan of dual-GPU cards.
Posted on Reply
#9
megamanxtreme
HumanSmoke said:
There's no way on earth a 295X2 overclocks to 290X levels....safely.
That contradicts the Liquid-Cooling solution, then. It should have a huge amount of head-room for that matter, over the 290X.
Posted on Reply
#10
HumanSmoke
megamanxtreme said:
That contradicts the Liquid-Cooling solution, then. It should have a huge amount of head-room for that matter, over the 290X.
It has nothing to do with cooling, but it does have everything to do with power delivery. The 295X2 is fed by two 8-pin PCI-E...more than a few single GPU 290X's have that. From Anand's review:
For power delivery and regulation AMD is using a 4+1+1 design for each GPU, which breaks down to 4 power phases for the GPU, one power phase for the memory interface, and one power phase for the memory itself. This 4+1+1 setup is functional for AMD’s needs at stock settings, but between the CLLC and the power delivery system it’s clear that AMD hasn’t built this board for extreme overclocking.
W1zzard managed a respectable 1120MHz core/ 6900MHz memory OC with the 295X2, he gained 1170 / 6760 with MSI's Lightning and 1180 / 6580 with PowerColor's PCS+ - two of either are cheaper than the 295X2, and you don't have to worry about the PSU cables heating up and running the card outside of the AWG18 cable specification

[Source]
Posted on Reply
#11
nem
295x2 - 11.5 TFLOPS
Titan Z = 8 TFLOPS
Posted on Reply
#12
jesdals
Did any one say TitanZ Fall? Fail is probably more like it, it seems the prize in the Eurozone is more than twice that of the 295x and you could get as many as seven 290x for the same amount or a fully dual 290x build with a Haswell cpu, 250gb SSD times 2, Z97 chipset and at least 32GB DDR3 2400MHz in a nice build, perhaps even leaving room for a 4K resolution monitor. That's just wrong, thats the TitanZ Fail...
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