Monday, October 20th 2014

NVIDIA Could Review GTX TITAN-Z Pricing for the Retail Channel

Under pressure from its own recently launched GeForce GTX 980 cannibalizing its $3,000 flagship GeForce GTX TITAN-Z (you can buy GTX 980 Quad-SLI at $2,200), NVIDIA could finally review its pricing, in the retail channel. The company recently reduced its price for the OEM channel, letting pre-built gaming PC manufacturers source the card at a lower price, whether those price-savings were transferred to the end-users, is a different question. To what measure NVIDIA could lower prices of the GTX TITAN-Z, is not known at this point. Retailers like OCUK were seen offering their GTX TITAN-Z cards at a slightly reduced price, last week. Across the big pond, American retailer Newegg sold-out an ASUS-branded GTX TITAN-Z for as low as US $1,500.

In the wake of GTX 980, AMD cut prices of its dual-GPU flagship product, the Radeon R9 295X2, down to $999. It's hard to imagine that competition from this card, and the GTX 980, are the only factors driving down prices of the GTX TITAN-Z in such a big way. Could NVIDIA be working on its next dual-GPU flagship graphics card already? Perhaps one based on a pair of GM204 chips, with thermal and power requirements as low as those of the GTX 690? Watch this space for more.

Source: Expreview
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25 Comments on NVIDIA Could Review GTX TITAN-Z Pricing for the Retail Channel

#1
birdie
NVIDIA is surely working on something and we'll know quite soon. ;)

Besides I cannot quite understand all the hullabaloo around the Titan Z. This card is like a Maserati - it was meant for the very rich or the users of GPU computing. It was never meant for average game players, because 780 Ti in SLI was a much better investment.

Last but not least NVIDIA hasn't made anyone buy it. Titan Z was a niche product for people with deep pockets.
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#2
Sony Xperia S
birdie said:
it was meant to the very rich or the users of GPU computing
Since when? You realise that this is the first stupidly priced halo card from nvidia? :D
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#3
bogami
Far too expensive for the power that you reach and surpass with GTX 970 SLI. moreover : heats more greedy for energy. R-9 amd 295x is obtained 800 € and is stronger and colder. How greedy can some be well seen here !stock will be giving away a gift card because it is not worth € 500 € 300 .max . Obsolete card IN SALE want to do a big profit .If theorder was issued as the first Kepler card would not have justified the price but because INVIDIA as we no on GTX680, KG 104 and also now GM204 selling the middle class in the higher price range, and this says marketing no wey. I would be ticked this for blackmail. horror is such prices !
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#4
HumanSmoke
Hard to see how the card is worth much more than the Titan Black in the present landscape. The 6GB of vRAM per GPU might be selling points for rendering in HD+ (4K definitely) , but the GTX 780 already has 6GB variants. Unless the workload is both scientific/analytical (for FP64) and price sensitive that precludes a Tesla/Quadro solution, it's hard to see where the card actually fits....although I'm guessing the point is largely moot since I doubt that there are many going into the channel in any case.
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#5
Dj-ElectriC
I'm quite sure that a right pricing for this is 900$, but there is not right pricing on those type of products.
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#6
Serpent of Darkness
birdie said:
NVIDIA is surely working on something and we'll know quite soon. ;)

Besides I cannot quite understand all the hullabaloo around the Titan Z. This card is like a Maserati - it was meant for the very rich or the users of GPU computing. It was never meant for average game players, because 780 Ti in SLI was a much better investment.

Last but not least NVIDIA hasn't made anyone buy it. Titan Z was a niche product for people with deep pockets.
"This card is like a Maserati" is an understatement. GTX Titan-Z is priced like a Maserati, but it runs like a Nissan Sentra. Two GTX 780 Ti in SLI, or Titan Blacks, put GTX Titan-Z to shame on average.

Again, NVidia intention was to sell an outrageously priced, dual graphic card on the assumption that the AMD R9-295x would flop like the AMD 7990. There's no other rational reason for a dual graphic card to be twice is predecessor. Since the R9-295x never failed, NVidia took a risk, and lost at that gamble. Now that GTX 980 is eating at the profits of all their previous generations, it's like Nvidia has a big, annoying monkey on it's back with the poor sales of the GTX Titan-Z. 2 GTX 980s would out perform a GTX Titan-Z, and for the price of 1 GTX Titan-Z, you can go Quad SLI GTX 980s ($400.00 x4 = $1,600.00 rough estimate) and still have money on the side to buy your g/f that Prada tote bag she's always wanted. GTX Titan-Z is still around 3-bones ($3,000.00) per unit. You're more or less paying for the hype, and proof that your ability to rationalize needs over wants is severely out of wack. Possibly the only good thing about the GTX Titan-Z would be it's 64bit floating point precision, and that's about it...
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#7
HumanSmoke
Serpent of Darkness said:
Now that GTX 980 is eating at the profits of all their previous generations, it's like Nvidia has a big, annoying monkey on it's back with the poor sales of the GTX Titan-Z.
Given the likely production run for the board, it's more like an underdeveloped Capuchin. The more salient point is the slice of humble pie the company served itself by underestimating AMD's resolve with the 295X2.
Serpent of Darkness said:
Possibly the only good thing about the GTX Titan-Z would be it's 64bit floating point precision, and that's about it...
GK 110 -depending upon workload*- is still a reasonable performer for rendering in relation to GM 204...

and if you need 6GB framebuffer for higher resolution work, a GTX 980/970 probably wont be attractive until 8GB versions start to arrive.
* 4K and up resolution. Blender seems well suited to GM 204, but some other CG (inc some path/ray trace engines that also leverage CUDA) rendering still favours GK 110 - at least until GM 200 shows up.
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#8
nickbaldwin86
hardly a consideration.. if it was $1000 you could then compare it to the 295 which has better performance in every game from every review I have seen.... $1500 for a card that gets beat up by a $1000 is a joke.

The Titan-Z isn't a price performance card for any gamer.... or you are just blind or have TONS of money.
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#9
GhostRyder
It never had a good price, design, or anything to make it an attractive buy. It really had some serious poor choices on it that make it even to a person looking for the crazy to second guess buying the Titan-Z. Server Racks where people would possibly buy these for render houses are not feasible in the general scenario even with some serious case design changes because of the 2 directional fan, gamers would choose two Titan Blacks (Heck 3 Titan Blacks) before purchasing that and get way more performance (Not even mentioning 2-4 780tis, R9 290X or 2 R9 295X2 cards), and even in compute field there still were better options out there.

Titan-Z had only one very small area it could make sense, in a case that could handle the 2.5slot cooler (Even using a bracket adapter) and was very small for those who wanted SLI/CFX in something portable or just small in general. But even that is such a small area that it did not really have any wandering eyes looking at it because all those gazes would still fall back on the other options out there. Even at a huge price drop to 1K I would still find it a very hard sell at this point except in a few other niche areas that will open up depending on how cheap it gets.

Either way, the card is very old news now.
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#10
64K
Yeah, I've never understood who Nvidia was trying to sell this card to for $3,000. I don't know about what professional card uses it may have been good for because I've never needed a professional card for business but from the very beginning Nvidia was marketing this card as "A Gaming Monster" on their GeForce website. As mentioned above it made more sense to get two $1,000 Titan Blacks or two $700 GTX 780Ti for gaming.

I was curious who was buying this card so I checked on the customer reviews occasionally on the EVGA Titan Z and there were about 25 reviews. Only 2 of them seemed real. The rest were just making a joke of the card saying things like this card can't run Minecraft or I bought one to attach to my XBox. Apparently they did sell some but I'd be curious to know how many at $3,000.
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#11
eidairaman1
Nv is forced to drop the price of its own product, it apparently isnt selling as well as the 295 at a lower price and overall works better.
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#12
荷兰大母猪
Actually I am a nvidia fan but between gtx Titan z and r9 295x2, no doubt I will choose amd.
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#13
ZeDestructor
荷兰大母猪 said:
Actually I am a nvidia fan but between gtx Titan z and r9 295x2, no doubt I will choose amd.
I wouldn't. I'd pick a pair of 970s in SLI instead, just to get Nvidia's better drivers. Then again, I use Linux, and AMD drivers still suck on Linux.
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#14
荷兰大母猪
ZeDestructor said:
I wouldn't. I'd pick a pair of 970s in SLI instead, just to get Nvidia's better drivers. Then again, I use Linux, and AMD drivers still suck on Linux.
Yeah me too. But I said the status is between gtx Titan z and r9 295 x2
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#15
ZeDestructor
荷兰大母猪 said:
Yeah me too. But I said the status is between gtx Titan z and r9 295 x2
I'd just sit and wait for the inevitable 990, or the big GM200 chip.

For myself, my SLI 670s sit tight until GM200 shows up, at which point an expensive upgrade will happen...
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#16
荷兰大母猪
ZeDestructor said:
I'd just sit and wait for the inevitable 990, or the big GM200 chip.

For myself, my SLI 670s sit tight until GM200 shows up, at which point an expensive upgrade will happen...
My friend has 3 way gtx670 sli lol
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#17
GhostRyder
64K said:
Yeah, I've never understood who Nvidia was trying to sell this card to for $3,000. I don't know about what professional card uses it may have been good for because I've never needed a professional card for business but from the very beginning Nvidia was marketing this card as "A Gaming Monster" on their GeForce website. As mentioned above it made more sense to get two $1,000 Titan Blacks or two $700 GTX 780Ti for gaming.
There lies the major problem for me and others with the Titan Branding. Marketing it as a gamers ultimate card with some professional software's felt a bit weird even though it seemed more like the card had been intended for the professional users on a budget (As weird with that price tag as it sounds) while gaming seemed to be more of what its overall design system was for.

Most people who buy dual GPU cards (I do sometimes) are using them for generally space savings in their case (Or lack of 16x slots). This cards marketing seemed to be aimed at no one because it seemed all the areas you could justify it there was a major drawback of some sort.

64K said:
I was curious who was buying this card so I checked on the customer reviews occasionally on the EVGA Titan Z and there were about 25 reviews. Only 2 of them seemed real. The rest were just making a joke of the card saying things like this card can't run Minecraft or I bought one to attach to my XBox. Apparently they did sell some but I'd be curious to know how many at $3,000..
Unless they said confirmed owner I would not trust it as people love to troll on things like that consistently. I would only guess the mind set for this card would be more of buying for the name than anything else since we can already establish better alternatives easily. Or like I said inside a case that has the room for its cooler that is a very small form factor and you want the power of the GPU pair inside.

eidairaman1 said:
Nv is forced to drop the price of its own product, it apparently isnt selling as well as the 295 at a lower price and overall works better.
Agreed, though I do not think anyone saw AMD doing something as crazy as the 295X2 was and making it as great as it was/is.
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#18
Animalpak
Nobody did a waterblock for the Titan Z...
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#20
xorbe
What gamer is going to pay $1500 for Titan-Z, when 2x970 saves $840.
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#21
TheHunter
I would rather see that real GK110 replacement GM210, then dual GM204..
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#22
15th Warlock
I can't believe people are still talking about this card, if there ever was a card that needed to be silently buried and never mentioned again, that card is the Titan-Z

Not even worth arguing for, much less the ridiculous sticker price nvidia slapped on it.
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#23
The Von Matrices
If you take away all the model names and branding, the original post can be summed up in two sentences:

Old products may get a price cut due to newer, faster products being introduced. More details later!

No shocker there...
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#24
Xaser04
HumanSmoke said:
Hard to see how the card is worth much more than the Titan Black in the present landscape. The 6GB of vRAM per GPU might be selling points for rendering in HD+ (4K definitely) , but the GTX 780 already has 6GB variants. Unless the workload is both scientific/analytical (for FP64) and price sensitive that precludes a Tesla/Quadro solution, it's hard to see where the card actually fits....although I'm guessing the point is largely moot since I doubt that there are many going into the channel in any case.
:confused: It is basically two (downclocked) Titan Blacks on a single card. It is quite easy to see why it is worth more than a Titan Black in isolation.

Whether either it or the Titan Black are worth their respective price points is a different arguement altogether.
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#25
HumanSmoke
Xaser04 said:
:confused: It is basically two (downclocked) Titan Blacks on a single card. It is quite easy to see why it is worth more than a Titan Black in isolation.

Whether either it or the Titan Black are worth their respective price points is a different arguement altogether.
Which is precisely the point I was making. The Titan Black remains at $1K even though the market for the card has changed. The Titan Black appealed because of two buying groups - those who wanted the pinnacle of performance for benchmarking (which no longer applies), and those who wanted a cheap Tesla/Quadro alternative - the majority of those people likely have already purchased and further uptake is unlikely with the Osborne Effect now taking place thanks to the inadvertent outing of GM 200's test and validation status.
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