Friday, May 15th 2015

Intel Core i7-5775C and i5-5675C Hit Retail Channel in Early June

Intel's upcoming 5th generation Core processors targeted at PC enthusiasts, the Core i7-5775K, and the Core i5-5675K, will be available in the retail channel on June 1st (NA, EMEA), and June 2nd (APAC). The two were available to the OEM channel since earlier this month. This is when you will be able to buy the two at a ground store, or online, in retail (box) packaging. Built in the LGA1150 package, the two will be compatible with existing Intel 9-series chipset motherboards (with BIOS updates).

Based on the swanky new 14 nm "Broadwell" silicon, the i7-5775C and the i5-5675C are quad-core chips. The i7-5775C offers clock speeds of 3.30 GHz, which spools up to 3.70 GHz with Turbo Boost; and will feature HyperThreading, enabling 8 logical CPUs. The i5-5675C offers 3.10 GHz clocks, with 3.60 GHz Turbo Boost frequencies. Both chips will offer 6 MB of L3 cache, Intel Iris Pro 6200 graphics; and TDP as low as 65W. For this reason, and others, the two won't exactly replace the i7-4790K and i5-4690K from the product stack. The two will ship with unlocked base-clock multipliers, letting you overclock them, and could still make for great buys for premium gaming PC builds. Source: Hermitage Akihabara
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80 Comments on Intel Core i7-5775C and i5-5675C Hit Retail Channel in Early June

#1
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I can't wait to grab a 5775C to replace my 4790K.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheGuruStud
Anyone put a watt meter on those tested when OCed? :roll:
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#4
RejZoR
I don't see any reason to upgrade my Core i7 920 with any currently existing quad with HT. Waiting for something that will deliver 12 or 16 threads (and be from new 14nm generation).
Posted on Reply
#5
ironwolf
If these prices are anywhere near correct, yuk yuk yuk. :shadedshu:
The Core i7-5775C is listed for a price of $479.99 US and the next model in the lineup, the Core i5-5675C is listed for a price of $349.99 US. The prices are not final but we suspect they are very close to the ones being mentioned by the retail sites with a $10-$20US difference. Supported by the LGA 1150 socket, the specs make little sense for current Haswell users to upgrade to Broadwell.
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#7
john_
Pre order prices always try to grab someone's wallet. But while this is the usual reason for seeing higher prices than the prices expected with products that are close to be released, the other reason that wccftech thinks that could influence the final price, does look a possibility
The only reason I can suspect for these higher prices could be the eDRAM and Iris Pro graphics chips since the mobile variants based on these designs before had higher costs on the R-Series BGA processors compared to the traditional HD graphics based processors.
Add to that, that Intel would probably prefer to sell Skylake CPUs and motherboards than Broadwell CPUs, and you have one more reason for Broadwell to be expensive.
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#8
GhostRyder
newtekie1, post: 3282409, member: 20670"
I can't wait to grab a 5775C to replace my 4790K.
Going to put the 4790K into another crunching machine when you replace it?
john_, post: 3282415, member: 137560"
$480

Intel Broadwell Core i7-5775C, Core i5-5675C and Skylake Core i7-6700, Core i5-6500 Listed By Online Retailers - Core i7-5775C Priced at $479.99 US
That is just the preorder BS, if they really did price it like that who would buy it (heck who would preorder for that much. Just buy a 5820K for less at that point... That would blow my mind...

(Yes I am aware of the X99 price differences and DDR4 in case that is mentioned).
Posted on Reply
#10
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
still on my old Ivybridge for sometime more....:shadedshu:
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#11
pjl321
Please do one of your questionnaire vote things on the side:

'Are you going to buy Broadwell?'

1) Yes, as quickly as I can
2) Only if there is a large performance increase over Haswell
3) I'm happy with what I've got
4) I'm waiting for Skylake
5) I'm waiting for Zen

I would be amazed if the first option gets any votes at all, seems like such a waste of money, silicone and boxes releasing Broadwell to the desktop at all.
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#13
DeNeDe
if broadwell has the same price as my current 4790k i'll buy it for testing.. i already have i5-4670k and i7-4790k..
if it is that pre-order price..then screw it.:)
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#14
<-_->
Krekeris, post: 3282433, member: 149693"
Wait, so Broadwell will not work with Z87?

"The socketed Core "Broadwell" chips could come in the LGA1150 package, running on existing 8-series and 9-series chipset motherboards, with BIOS updates."

Source: http://www.techpowerup.com/210384/intel-to-launch-socketed-broadwell-processors-in-mid-2015.html
In older news
some 8 series Motherboards support 5th Generation Core Processors.

支持Intel 第4代/第5代Core 处理器 = Supports 4th and 5th Generation Intel Core processors

Gigabyte.cn B85 Motherboard list
http://www.gigabyte.cn/products/list.aspx?s=42&jid=0&p=346&v=6
Gigabyte.cn H81 Motherboard list
http://www.gigabyte.cn/products/list.aspx?s=42&jid=0&p=346&v=8

Intel Japan Technology Division General Manager said
It should be noted that according to Akiba said, but until Haswell Refresh and Devil's Canyon in 8 Series can accommodate,
due to the different design of power in Broadwell, to put the power circuit of the new design in the 8 series in that it can not cope with the
(manufacturer side in the existing model While it correspond to Broadwell seems to be possible by, it is believed that Intel not guaranteed).
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fpc.watch.impress.co.jp%2Fdocs%2Fnews%2F20140512_647879.html
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#15
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Boooring.

I think they should have at least one unlocked model per family: Celeron K, Pentium K, i3 K etc.
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#16
Hood
I'm waiting to see what 14nm Broadwell SOC options become available, to replace the Celeron J1900 and Pentium J2900.
Posted on Reply
#17
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
GhostRyder, post: 3282430, member: 149328"
Going to put the 4790K into another crunching machine when you replace it?
4790K replaces 4690K, 4690K eventually replaces A10-6800K in server, A10-6800K gets re-assigned to low power machine for some family member.
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#18
Prima.Vera
Can somebody explain to me please, what is the exact purpose of those processors??
From my point of view they are not bringing anything worth mention to the table compared to the previous gens....
Posted on Reply
#19
RealNeil
newtekie1, post: 3282423, member: 20670"
Yeah, these processors won't be priced anywhere near that. This is just NCIX trying to rip people off on pre-orders as usual.
That's why it's known as the bleeding edge.

newtekie1, post: 3282475, member: 20670"
4790K replaces 4690K, 4690K eventually replaces A10-6800K in server, A10-6800K gets re-assigned to low power machine for some family member.
That's usually how I do it here,........like a waterfall.

Prima.Vera, post: 3282493, member: 98685"
Can somebody explain to me please, what is the exact purpose of those processors??
From my point of view they are not bringing anything worth mention to the table compared to the previous gens....
They have lower power usage, but 2MB less cache memory on them. Maybe they'll OC better if they use less power. I can't imagine them being an even performance swap with the Haswell refresh CPUs.
Posted on Reply
#20
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Prima.Vera, post: 3282493, member: 98685"
Can somebody explain to me please, what is the exact purpose of those processors??
From my point of view they are not bringing anything worth mention to the table compared to the previous gens....
Basically Intel created them to work out the kinks with the 14nm process. They were supposed to be out a long time ago to replace Haswell, but 14nm had so many problems they've been delayed to the point that they don't really matter to the market. That is why they are only doing a limited release. They would probably make good upgrades for someone with an 1150 i3, but that's about it.

RealNeil, post: 3282499, member: 150651"
That's why it's known as the bleeding edge.
It is only bleeding edge if you have something that other's can't get for cheaper at the exact same time you got it. But just because you pre-ordered it from NCIX doesn't mean anything, I'll still be able to walk into my local microcenter the day of and walk out with a 5775C for $200 cheaper than the idiots that pre-ordered it through NCIX.
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#21
Freezer
My Q6600 G0 does the trick for me :D
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#22
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
pjl321, post: 3282444, member: 70886"
Please do one of your questionnaire vote things on the side:

'Are you going to buy Broadwell?'

1) Yes, as quickly as I can
2) Only if there is a large performance increase over Haswell
3) I'm happy with what I've got
4) I'm waiting for Skylake
5) I'm waiting for Zen

I would be amazed if the first option gets any votes at all, seems like such a waste of money, silicone and boxes releasing Broadwell to the desktop at all.
Done. Go vote from the front-page.
Posted on Reply
#24
Caring1
Freezer, post: 3282505, member: 156257"
My Q6600 G0 does the trick for me :D
That's nice, I'm sure it's still capable for an old quad core Processor, if you don't use it for modern intensive games or programs.
Posted on Reply
#25
RejZoR
Actually, if overclocked, these old quads are still incredibly capable. In games, there will often be hardly any difference. It's the apps that usually show the highest differences...
Posted on Reply
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