Monday, June 22nd 2015

AMD "Fiji" Block Diagram Revealed, Runs Cool and Quiet

AMD's upcoming flagship GPU silicon, codenamed "Fiji," which is breaking ground on new technologies, such as HBM, memory-on-package, a specialized substrate layer that connects the GPU with it, called Interposer; features a hefty feature-set. More on the "Fiji" package and its memory implementation, in our older article. Its block diagram (manufacturer-drawn graphic showing the GPU's component hierarchy), reveals a scaling up, of the company's high-end GPU launches over the past few years.

"Fiji" retains the quad Shader Engine layout of "Hawaii," but packs 16 GCN Compute Units (CUs), per Shader Engine (compared to 11 CUs per engine on Hawaii). This works out to a stream processor count of 4,096. Fiji is expected to feature a newer version of the Graphics CoreNext architecture than "Hawaii." The TMU count is proportionately increased, to 256 (compared to 176 on "Hawaii"). AMD doesn't appear to have increased the ROP count, which is still at 64. The most significant change, however, is its 4096-bit HBM memory interface, compared to 512-bit GDDR5 on "Hawaii."
At its given clock speeds, of up to 1050 MHz core, with 500 MHz memory (512 GB/s bandwidth), on the upcoming Radeon R9 Fury X graphics card, "Fiji" offers a GPU compute throughput of 8.6 TFLOP/s, which is greater than the 7 TFLOP/s rated for NVIDIA's GeForce GTX Titan X. The reference board may draw power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors, but let that not scare you. Its typical board power is rated at 275W, just 25W more than the GTX Titan X, for 22% higher SPFP throughput (the two companies may use different methods to arrive at those numbers).

AMD claims that the reference cooling solution will pay heavy dividends in terms of temperatures and noise. In a typical gaming scenario, the temperatures will be around 50°C, and noise output under 32 dB. To put these into perspective, the reference NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X, sees its load temperatures reach 84°C, and its fan puts out 45 dB, in our testing. The cooling solution is confirmed to feature a Nidec-Servo made 120 mm fan. As with all flagship graphics cards over the past few generations, Radeon R9 Fury X will feature dual-BIOS, and ZeroCore (which powers down the GPU when the display-head is idling, and completely powers down non-primary GPUs in CrossFire setups, unless 3D loads warrant the driver to power them back up).

The Radeon R9 Fury X will be priced at US $649.99, and will be generally available in the next 3 or so weeks. Source: Hispazone
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73 Comments on AMD "Fiji" Block Diagram Revealed, Runs Cool and Quiet

#1
P4-630
btarunr
In a typical gaming scenario, the temperatures will be around 50°C
Wow, thats a very comfortable operating temperature while gaming!
Posted on Reply
#2
Luka KLLP
P4-630
Wow, thats a very comfortable operating temperature while gaming!
And don't forget that 32 dB!
Posted on Reply
#3
wotevajjjj
They've put the Radeon logo upside down. This card is dead to me..
Posted on Reply
#4
Caring1
Luka KLLP
And don't forget that 32 dB!
Ahh, but I will, because it is near inaudible.
Posted on Reply
#5
RejZoR
Current generations are proof that you can make better GPU's even on same process node (both Maxwell and Fiji). Making things smaller is the easiest and laziest way it seems...
Posted on Reply
#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
wotevajjjj
They've put the Radeon logo upside down. This card is dead to me..
That's just a render. Production cards have it the right way.



Posted on Reply
#7
GhostRyder
I am anxious to see this cooling solution in action, based on all that's being said it all sounds good.

Really would not mind that cooler shroud in my case, I would want to implement my own cooling solution while keeping that shroud intact.
Posted on Reply
#8
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
I would take that cooling right off and put a full coverage block on it right away. Water cooling the way its meant to be done.
Posted on Reply
#9
ZoneDymo
Should the title not be "AMD Does not trust its own hardware and has to desperately resort to watercooling otherwise their heater might melt" ?
Posted on Reply
#10
ZoneDymo
wotevajjjj
They've put the Radeon logo upside down. This card is dead to me..
I wish you could like screw it lose and flip it honestly for those cases with an "upside down" layout (or any other unconventional layout)
Posted on Reply
#11
Luka KLLP
ZoneDymo
Should the title not be "AMD Does not trust its own hardware and has to desperately resort to watercooling otherwise their heater might melt" ?
Are you freaking kidding me???

*sorry for feeding the trolls*
Posted on Reply
#12
John Doe
"AMD doesn't trust their own fans: "Fiji" watercooled"

Isn't that a much better title?

I take it that techpowerup received their review samples.
Posted on Reply
#15
mirakul
This is the most beautiful card I've ever seen. Simple but still class and beauty.
Posted on Reply
#16
Assimilator
More AMD PR spin. If Fury didn't need water cooling, it wouldn't have it. Water cooling makes the product more expensive and margins lower.

But as always, game benchmarks and independent reviews will tell the truth. I wonder if they fixed the idle and BluRay playback power leakage...
Posted on Reply
#17
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
ZoneDymo
Should the title not be "AMD Does not trust its own hardware and has to desperately resort to watercooling otherwise their heater might melt" ?
jesus leave it alone. Are you going to make posts like this every time btarunr makes anymore more news posts? Get over it.

John Doe
"AMD doesn't trust their own fans: "Fiji" watercooled"

Isn't that a much better title?

I take it that techpowerup received their review samples.
W1zzard has probably had the card for the last few weeks. Watching and laughing as we all speculate.
Posted on Reply
#18
Chaitanya
btarunr
In a typical gaming scenario, the temperatures will be around 50°C, and noise output under 32 dB.
I has been a long time since I read GPU temps for a stock card so low and this quite. I must say it's a job well done by AMD engineers for atleast making the card cool and quite under load.
Posted on Reply
#19
repman244
btarunr
the temperatures will be around 50°C, and noise output under 32 dB. To put these into perspective, the reference NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X, sees its load temperatures reach 84°C
I'm not saying it won't run cool but you cannot only compare temperatures, especially since the Titan is air cooled. What is important is how much HEAT is generated - which can be more even if the temperature is lower.
Posted on Reply
#20
moproblems99
repman244
I'm not saying it won't run cool but you cannot only compare temperatures, especially since the Titan is air cooled. What is important is how much HEAT is generated - which can be more even if the temperature is lower.
Which is a function of power draw. These are supposed to draw similar power envelopes* so what they say should be true.

*Measuring procedures may vary between brand.
Posted on Reply
#21
chinmi
Still too expensive, slow and bad driver support... Better buy a 980ti for that amount of money.
Nvidia still wins
And next year when nvidia start using HBM memory amd will surely die, because it can't keep up with the advancement in technology that nvidia r&d team have.
Still, this is a good card... But not as good as the 980ti.
Posted on Reply
#22
the54thvoid
chinmi
Still too expensive, slow and bad driver support... Better buy a 980ti for that amount of money.
Nvidia still wins
And next year when nvidia start using HBM memory amd will surely die, because it can't keep up with the advancement in technology that nvidia r&d team have.
Still, this is a good card... But not as good as the 980ti.
Cheaper than Titan X.
Faster than Titan X, or close to it.
Single GPU support absolutely on par with the opposition.

I'll buy two, use one in PC and use other to smack you around the head with.
Posted on Reply
#23
repman244
moproblems99
Which is a function of power draw. These are supposed to draw similar power envelopes* so what they say should be true.

*Measuring procedures may vary between brand.
And? My point still stands that the Titan could be using less power even if it runs at higher temperature.
Posted on Reply
#24
Lionheart
chinmi
Still too expensive, slow and bad driver support... Better buy a 980ti for that amount of money.
Nvidia still wins
And next year when nvidia start using HBM memory amd will surely die, because it can't keep up with the advancement in technology that nvidia r&d team have.
Still, this is a good card... But not as good as the 980ti.
Still too expensive, slow and bad driver support
The benchmarks aren't even out yet lol, dafuq!
Posted on Reply
#25
Tetsudo77
chinmi
Still too expensive, slow and bad driver support... Better buy a 980ti for that amount of money.
Nvidia still wins
And next year when nvidia start using HBM memory amd will surely die, because it can't keep up with the advancement in technology that nvidia r&d team have.
Still, this is a good card... But not as good as the 980ti.
AMD developed this card with many times less budget than nvidia, mind you. Technically speaking GCN is superior than anything nvidia can develope. AMD drivers tend to increase their cards performace overtime while NV drivers don't.

This comes from a owner of a GTX 970.
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