Tuesday, September 29th 2015

AMD Expands Embedded Graphics Lineup

AMD today announced multiple new discrete AMD Embedded Radeon graphics options suitable for multiple form factors. The suite of products is specifically designed to advance the visual and parallel processing capabilities of embedded applications. The graphics cards represent continued AMD commitment to embedded market innovation, providing engineers with more choices to achieve their design goals, from leading performance to energy efficiency.

The new offerings cover a broad range of needs, from 192 GFLOPS to 3 TFLOPS of single precision performance, and from 20 to less than 95 watts of thermal design power. The products are offered as a Multi-Chip Module (MCM), Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) and PCIe options, with AMD offering the only MCM solutions. All of these products offer extended support and longevity. The new discrete graphics cards offer the right balance of performance, power and graphics memory size, to meet the needs of most customers.

"The demand for rich, vibrant graphics in embedded systems is greater than ever before, and that demand is growing," said Scott Aylor, corporate vice president and general manager, AMD Embedded Solutions. "Our latest additions to the embedded product lineup help designers build mesmerizing user experiences with 4K multi-screen installations and 3-D and interactive displays. In addition, the powerful capabilities of our GPUs can address the toughest parallel compute challenges."

Three Levels of Performance
The graphics cards span three levels of performance within the embedded market: Ultra-High Performance, High Performance and Power Efficient. These offerings are as follows:
  • Ultra-High Performance: The AMD Embedded Radeon E8950MXM Module, the highest performing embedded graphics processing unit (GPU) from AMD.
  • High Performance: The AMD Embedded Radeon E8870 Series (MXM and PCIe), offering high performance solutions for virtually any embedded application.
  • Power Efficient: The AMD Embedded Radeon E6465 Series (MCM, MXM and PCIe) providing excellent processing performance at low levels of power consumption.
E8950MXM
The new AMD Embedded Radeon E8950MXM Module is an incredibly powerful discrete GPU that is well-suited for GPGPU compute and built for 4K applications with support for 4K decode, 4K encode, and up to six 4K displays. This product is ideal for high-end casino and arcade gaming machines, medical imaging devices and military/aerospace applications. The MXM module is a smaller form factor solution than standard commercial GPUs, making it ideal for systems with small space requirements, such as airplane cockpit controls and ultrasound machines. Key features include:
  • Type B Mobile PCI-Express Module (MXM)
  • 32 Compute Units; 3 TFLOPS single precision (Peak)
  • 8GB GDDR5 Memory; 256-bit wide
  • < 95W Thermal Design Power
  • Support for 4K hardware-accelerated decode and encode
  • AMD Eyefinity technology for up to 6 display outputs
  • Support for DirectX 12, OpenGL 4.5, and OpenCL 2.0
AMD Embedded Radeon E8870MXM Module and E8870PCIe Board options provide a balance of performance, power, capabilities and price to meet the needs of most customers. These options are well-suited for casino and arcade gaming machines, many medical imaging devices, and digital signage installations.

E8870MXM and E8870PCIe
  • 12 Compute Units; 1.5 TFLOPS single precision (Peak)
  • 4GB GDDR5 Memory; 128-bit wide
  • < 75W Thermal Design Power
  • Dual HD decode of H.264, VC-1, MPEG-4 and MPEG-2
  • AMD Eyefinity technology for up to 6 display outputs
  • Support for DirectX 12, OpenGL 4.5, and OpenCL 2.0
E6465MCM, E6465MXM and E6465PCIe
The power-efficient AMD Embedded Radeon E6465MCM GPU, E6465MXM Module and E6465PCIe Board all provide excellent processing performance at low power in a small form factor, making them well-suited for mobile signage, retail and kiosks, factory human-machine interface systems, heads-up conventional military/aerospace displays, and thin client computers.
  • 2 Compute Units; 192 GFLOPS single precision (Peak)
  • 2GB GDDR5 Memory; 64-bit wide
  • < 20W Thermal Design Power
  • Dual HD decode of H.264, VC-1, MPEG-4 and MPEG-2
  • AMD Eyefinity technology for up to 4 display outputs
  • Support for DirectX 11.1, OpenGL 4.5, and OpenCL 1.2
All of the new high-performance and power efficient AMD Embedded Radeon graphics options offer an industry-leading five-year longevity supply commitment. Each supports Microsoft Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows 10, and Linux.
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18 Comments on AMD Expands Embedded Graphics Lineup

#1
TheMailMan78
Big Member
Jesus that naming scheme is confusing as hell.
Posted on Reply
#2
happita
btarunr, post: 3350991, member: 43587"
The new offerings cover a broad range of needs, from 192 GFLOPS to 3 TFLOPS of single precision performance, and from 20 to less than 95 watts of thermal design power. The products are offered as a Multi-Chip Module (MCM), Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) and PCIe options, with AMD offering the only MCM solutions.
Meaning that they are targeting the ultrabook and notebook segments more aggressively right? They should dedicate more of their resources towards this since it is painfully obvious that we are moving into a "mobile" world like smartphones that people use to do most of their work on nowadays. Isn't this where most sales come from?
Posted on Reply
#3
HumanSmoke
happita, post: 3351116, member: 41685"
Meaning that they are targeting the ultrabook and notebook segments more aggressively right? They should dedicate more of their resources towards this since it is painfully obvious that we are moving into a "mobile" world like smartphones that people use to do most of their work on nowadays. Isn't this where most sales come from?
I'm not entirely sure that AMD read the market as everyone else seems to...
AMD will skip Chromebooks until prices, features match better, CTO says - Mark Papermaster (February 2015)
Chromebooks Overtake Notebooks - Sales figures January-June 2015
Posted on Reply
#5
HumanSmoke
ShurikN, post: 3351209, member: 140585"
That doesn't change the fact that they have useless OS on them.
Which has absolutely nothing to do with selling hardware.

More than a few people believe Windows to be useless as well. Do you believe that AMD should have boycotted the PC market when Win8 was released also? AMD are so strong that they can afford to be choosy about OS's their hardware is used in conjunction with? :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#6
Lord Romulus
This look a pretty news. Anyway I'm waiting at least 2 TFLOPS from nextgen architecture 'Zen' on APU chips with DDR4 dual-channel support of course.
Posted on Reply
#7
Uplink10
HumanSmoke, post: 3351214, member: 98425"
Do you believe that AMD should have boycotted the PC market when Win8 was released also?
Well x86 is not only Windows, and Windows 8 compared to the useless-out-of-the-box-experience-and-lack-of-options-in-Home-edition-and-no-theme-colour-options of Windows 10 is pretty good.

I think Chromebooks make sense when you are having RISC CPU but when you put an x86 in it and there may not be an option to run Linux or Windows on Chromebook it start sucking big time.

He has a problem installing Linux on Chromebook:
http://www.russellhollander.com/2015/09/23/chromebooks-linux-and-lenovo/

So why should AMD put their APUs in Chromebook if having ARM or x86 SoC/APU does not matter much because it well sucks (you do not gain any new functionality) and the UEFI/BIOS (or whatever the Chromebooks have) sucks too. It just raises the price of Chromebook and the battery will run out more quickly.

Mother: Happy birthday son, here I got you a notebook!
Son: [present still wrapped] What is it?
Mother: Chromebook!
Son: Thank you. (In his head: fuck, fuck, fuck, fucking Google!)
Posted on Reply
#8
Basard
Lord Romulus, post: 3351222, member: 160283"
This look a pretty news. Anyway I'm waiting at least 2 TFLOPS from nextgen architecture 'Zen' on APU chips with DDR4 dual-channel support of course.
Screw DDR4... I want HBM... HBM on the chip--at least 12 gigs worth. And I want HBM in my motherboard's RAM slots.

Edit: Actually, screw all that... I want a dual socket mobo, one socket for a cpu, and one with a shitload of HBM all over it. Actually, make that three socket--need another one for the GPU. Then I'm good.
Posted on Reply
#9
xenocide
Basard, post: 3351249, member: 33749"
And I want HBM in my motherboard's RAM slots.
That would basically be DDR4 if I'm not mistaken. The proximity to the processor is what makes HBM work, not the memory itself.
Posted on Reply
#10
HumanSmoke
Uplink10, post: 3351248, member: 154252"
So why should AMD put their APUs in Chromebook if having ARM or x86 SoC/APU does not matter much because it well sucks
Because even if it sucks it means AMD are selling hardware and creating a base with the OEM? Because deciding not to means you sell nothing? Wasn't the whole reasoning behind Beema and Mullins to get into new low power market segments? No? Guess it's just me then.
Posted on Reply
#11
ShurikN
Chromebooks were and are a risky thing for AMD. You are basically stuck with a enlarged phone, that can only do the basics.
It's like android tablets, useful only for light browsing, music and crap games. I believe AMD notices this as well, bc that is not where the money is. This is ofc my assumption. Doesn't necessarily mean it will fail, but the chance is high for a crash and burn. And AMD can't allow any more fuck ups.
Posted on Reply
#12
bencrutz
HumanSmoke, post: 3351273, member: 98425"
Because even if it sucks it means AMD are selling hardware and creating a base with the OEM? Because deciding not to means you sell nothing? Wasn't the whole reasoning behind Beema and Mullins to get into new low power market segments? No? Guess it's just me then.
amd ditched it.
intel is pushing hard with atom, cut throat segment. i think it is a smart thing to keep away from such market. amd can't, won't sustain another loss. but maybe you just love them to crash hard and burn
Posted on Reply
#13
Lord Romulus
Basard, post: 3351249, member: 33749"
Screw DDR4... I want HBM... HBM on the chip--at least 12 gigs worth. And I want HBM in my motherboard's RAM slots.

Edit: Actually, screw all that... I want a dual socket mobo, one socket for a cpu, and one with a shitload of HBM all over it. Actually, make that three socket--need another one for the GPU. Then I'm good.
HBM memory? It is for dedicated GPU video card.
I'm talking about APU, chips with CPU+GPU parts in same silicon die.
APU just can use shared main/system memory... right? So, APU use DDR3 or DDR4 by Zen cores maybe.

Sorry if I didn't understand what did you mean :confused:
Posted on Reply
#14
geon2k2
I think embedded is for ATM's, slot machines, or other sort of machines and not for regular computers ... not that they could not be used though.
Posted on Reply
#15
HumanSmoke
geon2k2, post: 3351340, member: 156730"
I think embedded is for ATM's, slot machines, or other sort of machines and not for regular computers ... not that they could not be used though.
Digital signage and industrial/office terminals (including monitoring/inventory, and probably automotive applications) would also be a big part of the market. High volume, but it will be split with ARM-based SoC microcontroller/microprocessors that already have a sizable presence in the markets thanks to companies like NXP (Philips) and Freescale, Avago and Broadcom, Atmel, Spansion, STM etc. The two acquisition/mergers (NXP / Freescale and Avago/Broadcom) presently on the table totaling $US50bn are a testament to the seriousness of the competition.
Posted on Reply
#16
Netcut
TheMailMan78, post: 3351105, member: 39776"
Jesus that naming scheme is confusing as hell.
maybe this will help....
Posted on Reply
#17
profoundWHALE
It would be nice if they kept the A__ part to the sum of the CPU/GPU cores/compute clusters
Posted on Reply
#18
Basard
Lord Romulus, post: 3351305, member: 160283"
HBM memory? It is for dedicated GPU video card.
I'm talking about APU, chips with CPU+GPU parts in same silicon die.
APU just can use shared main/system memory... right? So, APU use DDR3 or DDR4 by Zen cores maybe.

Sorry if I didn't understand what did you mean :confused:
More power!!!!!
Posted on Reply
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