Thursday, October 29th 2015

Intel Shows Off Optane 3D XPoint SSD and SSD-DIMM Implementation

At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, Intel took the opportunity to show off its latest implementation of the revolutionary 3D XPoint memory technology, which aims to replace NAND flash as the staple high-performance solid-state storage technology; offering exponential gains in density and performance. Optane, codename for Intel's upcoming 3D XPoint SSD based on conventional storage interfaces (PCIe M.2, U.2, PCIe add-on card) and the modern NVMe protocol; was demoed on Oracle's X5-2 series 1U server, where it clocked 4.42 times the random access performance, and 6.44 times better latency, than the fastest NAND flash based SSD in those form-factors. Optane promises 7.13 times the throughput when used with Oracle software.

That was only part of the presentation. The other being an audacious new contraption, a prototype 3D XPoint based SSD in the DDR4 DIMM form-factor. Intel envisions high-capacity SSD storage to eliminate most system-level bottlenecks, and talk directly to the processor's integrated memory controller. System builders will be able to combine DDR4-DRAM memory modules with Optane DIMM modules over vacant channels, and end up with the lowest possible latency storage interface. According to Intel CEO Brian Krzanich, Optane DIMM modules will be the closest that storage will have ever gone to the performance levels of DRAM, and should greatly accelerate in-memory database implementations.
Source: ThePlatform.net
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9 Comments on Intel Shows Off Optane 3D XPoint SSD and SSD-DIMM Implementation

#1
Parn
Doubt this will be ready for consumers by the time Cannonlake becomes available.
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#2
ssdpro
"Optane" is probably the worst branding name I have ever heard. That is dangerously close to OCZ Technology's old "Octane" which are some of the worst SSDs ever produced. I checked to see if Optane was a legitimate word that I didn't know and nothing appears at dictionary or merriam. If they want to just make up ridiculous names it might as well be Erftaburf Series SSDs.
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#3
yagga
ssdpro said:
"Optane" is probably the worst branding name I have ever heard. That is dangerously close to OCZ Technology's old "Octane" which are some of the worst SSDs ever produced.
The exact same thing went through my head the moment i saw that name.
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#4
Legacy-ZA
I guess Intel wanst to make a connection with; that it will actually be "obtainable"? Doubtful as I am sure with those performance figures, you can expect to pay an arm and leg for it. :P
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#5
Uplink10
I do not think Intel holds the patent for ULLtraDIMM.
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#6
Assimilator
Parn said:
Doubt this will be ready for consumers by the time Cannonlake becomes available.
Wikipedia
Cannonlake (formerly Skymont) is Intel's codename for the 10-nanometer die shrink of Skylake said:
... before Optane SSDs start shipping sometime in 2016.
The Platform
Krzanich said that Intel will have working Optane DIMMs ready later this year for early testers...
Wrong. bta said:
Doubtful as I am sure with those performance figures, you can expect to pay an arm and leg for it. :p
As is the case with all new tech. But as consumer adoption increases costs will decrease, and there will always be high-end prosumers who can afford the best, so the price of NAND should drop soon after XPoint launches.
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#7
deemon
so when we can see first U.2 versions of those and at what price? (eg. when would it be worth to buy the ASUS VIII Impact ... since currently U.2 is pointless with only Intel 750 series)
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#8
ypsylon
Soon we will get HPTX motherboards with one CPU socket and about 80 DIMM slots to fill with SSD-DIMMs. ;)

Seriously tho. It looks extremely promising, but doubt very much that it will hit the consumer market any time soon. It will require extensive time in the enterprise segment before it is downgraded to "PC enthusiast/consumer" grade. At this moment in time NVMe is more than enough for most of extreme jobs you can think of. There simply not enough processing power inside CPU itself on one side and software on the other to require more.

To fully utilize benefits of NVMe or X-Point we need more lanes for starters and radically redesigned motherboards with more bandwidth than you can imagine today. Take just ordinary "slow" 750. Inside that monster sits 18 channel controller. Which means if you put enough dies on PCB x16 Gen. 3 PCI-Ex slot will be hopelessly insufficient for the task in hand. PCI Express Gen. 15 anyone?

It's funny that 15 years ago everything was totally bottlenecked by slow spinning HDDs. Today situation is totally reversed. HDDs are disappearing (slowly but surely) into oblivion and current scheme how PC is working quickly turning to be obsolete - storage is bottlenecked by everything else..

Irony of fate my friends...
Posted on Reply
#9
Legacy-ZA
Assimilator said:

As is the case with all new tech. But as consumer adoption increases costs will decrease, and there will always be high-end prosumers who can afford the best, so the price of NAND should drop soon after XPoint launches.
Right... do you even know how long the previous SSD's have been out for? Almost 8 years now, funny how they remain high in price though right? If you compare it with all other computer components, SSD's are a complete RIPOFF price wise.

Another thing; large consumer base "adoption" can't occur when a great many can't afford it.
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