Tuesday, January 5th 2016

SanDisk Unveils World's Thinnest 1TB M.2 Solid State Drive

SanDisk Corporation, a global leader in flash storage solutions, today announced availability of the new SanDisk X400 SSD, the world's thinnest one terabyte (1TB) M.2 solid state drive (SSD). It is the first single-sided 1TB SATA M.2 form factor with a mere 1.5mm height. The X400 SSD is designed for fast start-up and application launch, as well as for extended battery life. Consumer research conducted by SanDisk in late 2015 indicates that these benefits are important for more than 70% of consumers when using PCs.

"Consumers have spoken. They want to work faster, with fewer interruptions. Our ultra-slim 1TB M.2 X400 SSD enables our OEM customers to build completely new form factors with outstanding reliability and the near-instant boot-up and application loading that consumers expect," said Tarun Loomba, Vice President and General Manager of Client Storage Solutions at SanDisk. "The X400 SSD is the flexible, highly reliable platform that our customers need to ensure an exceptional user experience for consumers."

"We have been witnessing a major shift in PC user-adoption as more consumers are increasingly choosing ultramobile devices," said Jeff Janukowicz, research director for solid state drives and enabling technologies at IDC. "The evolution of flash storage and its form factors has helped this category grow. SSD-based machines that are thinner, more lightweight and optimized for mobility provide a compelling and powerful solution to consumer and business users."

Designed for High Reliability
Both consumer and enterprise PC users can expect exceptional reliability even with heavy use. For example, in testing, a 256GB X400 SSD was rated to operate for more than 5 years with a workload of approximately 40GB/day3. This performance makes the X400 SSD an optimal solution for enterprise or other OEM customers who need a highly reliable solution for systems that are broadly deployed in the field, such as digital signage, networking gear, point of sale (POS), and commercial PCs.

The X400 SSD also achieves increased reliability and endurance by implementing SanDisk's own nCache 2.0 technology and DataGuard technology as well as additional error correction mechanisms. Based on SanDisk's 6th generation X3 Technology, the SanDisk X400 SSD uses 90% less power than a traditional hard disk drive4. Consumers that upgrade to the X400 SSD will now have the luxury of working longer without a power source, and enjoying faster response times while moving data more efficiently.

In addition, the X400 SSD offers data protection through AES 256-bit compliant encryption and TCG Opal 2.0 compatibility, targeting users in the healthcare, financial services and education sectors who need to be compliant with industry regulations.

The SanDisk X400 SSD is currently available in 2.5'' cased and M.2 2280 form factors at 128GB, 256GB, 512GB and 1TB capacities.
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31 Comments on SanDisk Unveils World's Thinnest 1TB M.2 Solid State Drive

#1
PP Mguire
Am I blind, or do I not see any specs? I want at least a Gen2 4x 1TB or larger M.2 please. I see 1TB but if it's SATA I'm better off getting what's presumably going to be cheaper 850 EVO.
Posted on Reply
#3
vega22
Cybrnook2002 said:
Specs, pfff, this should be all you need to know to buy one.

Youtube: nSFxr_lfTrc
sanddisk lets you time travel?

shutupandtakemymoney.gif
Posted on Reply
#4
Parn
PP Mguire said:
Am I blind, or do I not see any specs? I want at least a Gen2 4x 1TB or larger M.2 please. I see 1TB but if it's SATA I'm better off getting what's presumably going to be cheaper 850 EVO.
Checked other news sites. It's SATA unfortunately, so no fancy PCIe NVMe here.
Posted on Reply
#5
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Are the m.2 ssds really that much faster than sata 6?
Posted on Reply
#6
PP Mguire
Easy Rhino said:
Are the m.2 ssds really that much faster than sata 6?
It depends on what the communication protocol is.
Posted on Reply
#7
ironwolf
I have not built anything with a M.2 drive, is the height/thickness really an issue? :confused:
Posted on Reply
#8
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Easy Rhino said:
Are the m.2 ssds really that much faster than sata 6?
This is the thing, M.2 is a connector (or maybe a form factor). The protocol, as PP says, can eiter be PCIe or SATA. And USB according to Wikipedia.

ironwolf said:
I have not built anything with a M.2 drive, is the height/thickness really an issue? :confused:
This was my thought as well. They're pretty damned tiny already.
Posted on Reply
#9
Jizzler
ironwolf said:
I have not built anything with a M.2 drive, is the height/thickness really an issue? :confused:
Yes -- for this specific product. The X400 will largely be sold to OEMs that build their products around such specifications, i.e. their Ultrabook can now be a couple mm thinner while still offering superior capacity.

For the most part it doesn't matter when building a desktop, though I would always double-check. Some boards, especially ITX, may only allow for single-sided so that it takes up minimal space.
Posted on Reply
#10
PP Mguire
Jizzler said:
Yes -- for this specific product. The X400 will largely be sold to OEMs that build their products around such specifications, i.e. their Ultrabook can now be a couple mm thinner while still offering superior capacity.

For the most part it doesn't matter when building a desktop, though I would always double-check. Some boards, especially ITX, may only allow for single-sided so that it takes up minimal space.
For instance, mITX boards that have the M.2 on the back.
Posted on Reply
#12
Cybrnook2002
Easy Rhino said:
yea it looks like M.2 is considered a form factor. Wow, the PCIE ones are freaking fast!

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4P03H20193&cm_re=m.2-_-20-147-467-_-Product
You being sarcastic? I don't mean that in a bad sense by any means, just suprised as your normally on top of your game.

yes, they "can" be extremely fast. The drive you linked is a nice one as of today (I think there is a 951 series in NVMe with x4 gen3). The key getting the best overall is to make sure the M.2 on the motherboard is a True x 4 PCI Gen 3.0 slot that ties to CPU (preferably). THEN, you need to make sure to match it with an NVMe M.2 PXI x 4 Gen 3.0 Drive.

The pitfall is either of those requirements (MB or Drive) can be offered in x 4 , x 2, Or even SATA. So mixing and matching will limit you to the slowest of the 2.
Posted on Reply
#13
PP Mguire
Cybrnook2002 said:
You being sarcastic? I don't mean that in a bad sense by any means, just suprised as your normally on top of your game.

yes, they "can" be extremely fast. The drive you linked is a nice one as of today (I think there is a 951 series in NVMe with x4 gen3). The key getting the best overall is to make sure the M.2 on the motherboard is a True x 4 PCI Gen 3.0 slot that ties to CPU (preferably). THEN, you need to make sure to match it with an NVMe M.2 PXI x 4 Gen 3.0 Drive.

The pitfall is either of those requirements (MB or Drive) can be offered in x 4 , x 2, Or even SATA. So mixing and matching will limit you to the slowest of the 2.
Which is why I asked if it was SATA because it makes it pointless to me in M.2 offering.
Posted on Reply
#14
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Cybrnook2002 said:
You being sarcastic? I don't mean that in a bad sense by any means, just suprised as your normally on top of your game.

yes, they "can" be extremely fast. The drive you linked is a nice one as of today (I think there is a 951 series in NVMe with x4 gen3). The key getting the best overall is to make sure the M.2 on the motherboard is a True x 4 PCI Gen 3.0 slot that ties to CPU (preferably). THEN, you need to make sure to match it with an NVMe M.2 PXI x 4 Gen 3.0 Drive.

The pitfall is either of those requirements (MB or Drive) can be offered in x 4 , x 2, Or even SATA. So mixing and matching will limit you to the slowest of the 2.
Right, I was speaking of M.2 in general and pointed out one of the fastest ones if paired with the proper MB.
Posted on Reply
#15
Cybrnook2002
I was more just responding to Rhino, and the shock to see how fast x4 M.2 can be. But yes, it's a pig with lipstick.

Yes, this particular drive in this thread is hot garbage and would only serve the purpose of filling in a slot on your MB. However, the M.2 design can be pretty sweet. But, of course, I have moved to the Intel 750 and am now enjoying that. Just make sure you divide your PCIe lanes up properly if you invest in a x4.
Posted on Reply
#16
PP Mguire
Easy Rhino said:
Right, I was speaking of M.2 in general and pointed out one of the fastest ones if paired with the proper MB.
You also have cards like the Angelbird that will enable gen 3 4x with NVMe boot on boards like mine. Too bad they want an arm and a leg for a card.
Posted on Reply
#17
Cybrnook2002
But you get that Austrian Quality though..... (Where we are from :-) ) Oh, and you need to use only Noctua Fans !

Sneakypeet smacked me a bit when I gave him shit about the cost of KLEVV (Skynix home brand) RAM that I didn't want to hear but it's true. They are an up and comer trying to penetrate the market. New entities need the capital to grow and expand.
Posted on Reply
#18
PP Mguire
It's still just an adapter card though, with LEDs and a small heatsink. There's really no reason for the markup.
Posted on Reply
#19
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
Cybrnook2002 said:
Just make sure you divide your PCIe lanes up properly if you invest in a x4.
OK, I'm da big dummy here. How does one divide up the lanes? :twitch:

Is it just being aware what use of lanes reduces your primary x16 lane to a x8?
Posted on Reply
#20
Cybrnook2002
Exactly it, be aware. I am on X99 with a 5930, so I have a bit more breathing room. But the ever so popular Z97 and now Skylake are back on limited PCIe lanes. So be cognizant of what is using what (CPU and PCH) and how many lanes are in use. Most of the time the X4 M.2 on the MB will be shared with something else. So if you fully populate the M.2 slot at X4, then for example, your secondary PCIe slot will drop to x8 or x4 because they are shared lanes. Or if you pop in the sound card, another slot may be disabled altogether.......
Posted on Reply
#21
Parn
rtwjunkie said:
OK, I'm da big dummy here. How does one divide up the lanes? :twitch:

Is it just being aware what use of lanes reduces your primary x16 lane to a x8?
The lanes are usually pre-divided for you by motherboard manufacturers, so you only have partial controls on them. Check the user manual carefully before selecting which M.2 (if there are multiple ports) or PCIe slot to use.

Generally on Z97 there is only one M.2 limited to x2 Gen2. It may also share the lanes with the 3rd PCIe x16 slot (electrically x4 Gen2 from the PCH). On Z170 the situation is a lot better. If there is only one M.2 then it's x4 Gen3 and doesn't share the lanes with anything else. You will need to be careful with some "so called" high-end boards which offer multiple M.2 and even U.2 because it's very likely they share the lanes with each other. As a result only one of them can be used at a time (e.g. Asus ROG M8F. This one has a very poor design in terms of lane sharing).

M.2 on X99 tends to be wired to CPU directly for optimal performance. However SATA based M.2 SSDs (the one listed in the above article) do not work in these slots because they require the host SATA controller which is only available on the PCH.
Posted on Reply
#22
R-T-B
Cybrnook2002 said:
The key getting the best overall is to make sure the M.2 on the motherboard is a True x 4 PCI Gen 3.0 slot that ties to CPU (preferably).
Ok, I'll bite.

My PCIe x4 slot I'm using ties to to my chipset, which is z170, and has a x4 link to the CPU via DMI. What am I losing by doing this if anything, instead of using a true CPU slot (and thus cannibalizing lanes from my video card)?

PP Mguire said:
You also have cards like the Angelbird that will enable gen 3 4x with NVMe boot on boards like mine. Too bad they want an arm and a leg for a card.
Speaking as an Angelbird owner, you still need BIOS level NVMe support. Says it right in their documentation. Their card isn't magic, it's really just a big heatsink.
Posted on Reply
#23
Parn
R-T-B said:
Ok, I'll bite.

My PCIe x4 slot I'm using ties to to my chipset, which is z170, and has a x4 link to the CPU via DMI. What am I losing by doing this if anything, instead of using a true CPU slot (and thus cannibalizing lanes from my video card)?
In your case the only thing you lose is latency as the data will have to go through the PCH before reaching the CPU.
Posted on Reply
#24
Cybrnook2002
Parn said:
In your case the only thing you lose is latency as the data will have to go through the PCH before reaching the CPU.
Correct, latency.

In real world it's negligible outside of benchmarks. Your games and boot times will still be fast as hell. But your theoretical "could" be faster.

But, if you set out to get THE FASTEST drive in the form of M.2, your research would lead you to a x 4 tied to PC and an X4 gen 3 NVMe.
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