Tuesday, July 26th 2016

Patriot Memory Announces DDR4-3733 Variants of Viper 4 and Viper Elite Series

Patriot, a leading manufacturer of high performance computer memory, SSDs, gaming peripherals, consumer flash storage solutions and mobile accessories, today announced the immediate release of its new extreme performance Viper 4 and high performance Viper Elite DDR4 in 3733 MHz dual kits.

Expanding Patriot's extreme performance and high performance DDR4 memory lines, the 3733 MHz Viper 4 and Viper Elite dual channel kits are designed for optimal use with the latest Intel X99 and 100 series motherboards. With consumers utilizing more taxing professional applications, large capacity PC games and having a need for higher memory optimization, the Viper 4 and Viper Elite will present unsurpassed performance and reliability that only 30 years of DRAM experience can deliver.
"Patriot is very excited to announce its fastest kits yet," said Les Henry, Patriot's VP of Engineering. "Not only were we able to hit 3733 MHz, but we were able to do it with higher capacity 16 GB kits."

Available in 16GB (2 x 8 GB) dual kits, both the Viper 4 and Viper Elite 3733MHz will deliver tested timings of 17-19-19-39 and pull 1.35V of power. Patriot's extreme performance heat shields will ensure the rapid dissipation of heat to maintain ideal system temperatures and stability while still maintaining an aesthetically pleasing appearance to compliment any system build. XMP 2.0 ready and backed by a lifetime warranty, all Viper 4 series memory modules are hand tested and validated for system compatibility.

Availability
Patriot's Viper 4 and Viper Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) 3733MHz dual kits will be available for purchase online and in stores August 3, 2016 for a starting MSRP of $159.99.
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14 Comments on Patriot Memory Announces DDR4-3733 Variants of Viper 4 and Viper Elite Series

#1
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
i wish they will re-done something like this:


the most sexiest memory kit ever, i really regret selling mine....

Regards,
Posted on Reply
#2
ZoneDymo
peche, post: 3495336, member: 153520"
i wish they will re-done something like this:


the most sexiest memory kit ever, i really regret selling mine....

Regards,
Looks kinda cheap to me, also...extreme masters? what a silly name.
But hey, if its good its good and that is all that matters.
Posted on Reply
#3
JATownes
Why a green PCB? Should have gone with black. IMO the green PCB makes what would otherwise be a really nice looking kit look...generic.

My 2 cents.

JAT
Posted on Reply
#4
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
JATownes, post: 3495346, member: 61626"
Why a green PCB? Should have gone with black. IMO the green PCB makes what would otherwise be a really nice looking kit look...generic.

My 2 cents.

JAT
+1....

ZoneDymo, post: 3495345, member: 66089"
Looks kinda cheap to me, also...extreme masters? what a silly name.
But hey, if its good its good and that is all that matters.
commemorative edition, of intel extreme masters...
Posted on Reply
#5
RejZoR
Holy mother of sweet baby Jesus. 3733 MHz at those timings. Not bad. It's not ridiculously expensive either. I mean, sure, it's still $300 for a 32GB setup, but it's what, the fastest RAM available at the moment? I've seen kits for well over twice as much back in DDR3 era.
Posted on Reply
#6
RandomSadness
RejZoR, post: 3495351, member: 1515"
I've seen kits for well over twice as much back in DDR3 era.
DDR3 was much more expensive per GB back then.
Posted on Reply
#7
Air
peche, post: 3495336, member: 153520"
i wish they will re-done something like this:


the most sexiest memory kit ever, i really regret selling mine....

Regards,
I prefer them without stickers. For me the best looking yet is this one (mine came with black PCB, but i couldnt find a picture):

Posted on Reply
#8
cadaveca
My name is Dave
RejZoR, post: 3495351, member: 1515"
Holy mother of sweet baby Jesus. 3733 MHz at those timings. Not bad. It's not ridiculously expensive either. I mean, sure, it's still $300 for a 32GB setup, but it's what, the fastest RAM available at the moment? I've seen kits for well over twice as much back in DDR3 era.
3733 MHz is fastest ram available now? Uh, no... you can get 4266 MHz kits. 4500 MHz kit from G.Skill is also around. For 16 GB sticks, yeah, great, but when there's much higher speeds of 8 GB sticks... why does it matter?
Posted on Reply
#9
D007
What ever happened to the days of super fast timings? lol.. And do these super high frequencies, translate into any real performance gain for gamers?
I've been told that since we hit the 2000 mark, it's all been pretty insignificant in terms of gains. Is that accurate?
Posted on Reply
#10
cadaveca
My name is Dave
D007, post: 3495551, member: 36880"
What ever happened to the days of super fast timings? lol.. And do these super high frequencies, translate into any real performance gain for gamers?
I've been told that since we hit the 2000 mark, it's all been pretty insignificant in terms of gains. Is that accurate?
There are gains to be had in certain situations for sure. There are also situations where there are no gains. So that allows tests to be hand-picked to show either/or. That's why I don't do a lot of game tests in my memory reviews, because if gains are shown, they don't translate across the board.

Yet at the same time, the same can be said for faster CPUs... does that mean we should all buy the lowest possible?

When it comes to high-density DIMMs, higher speeds and relatively tight timings offset the loss of performance from the larger IC size.

As to the timings, they are pretty good to begin with; consider 2133 MHz JEDEC spec is 15-15-15. These sticks will also offer bandwidth that greatly exceeds anything DDR3 could offer.
Posted on Reply
#11
D007
cadaveca, post: 3495562, member: 25138"
There are gains to be had in certain situations for sure. There are also situations where there are no gains. So that allows tests to be hand-picked to show either/or. That's why I don't do a lot of game tests in my memory reviews, because if gains are shown, they don't translate across the board.

Yet at the same time, the same can be said for faster CPUs... does that mean we should all buy the lowest possible?

When it comes to high-density DIMMs, higher speeds and relatively tight timings offset the loss of performance from the larger IC size.

As to the timings, they are pretty good to begin with; consider 2133 MHz JEDEC spec is 15-15-15. These sticks will also offer bandwidth that greatly exceeds anything DDR3 could offer.
Cool, thanks for the info.. I just remember when it use to be 4-4-4-12 timings.. Back in the day of ddr2, 800. Seeing the timings go over triple what they use to be, made me curious.
Posted on Reply
#12
PP Mguire
peche, post: 3495336, member: 153520"
i wish they will re-done something like this:


the most sexiest memory kit ever, i really regret selling mine....

Regards,
I had some of these and they were ok. Think my favorite RAM has to be the OCZ Flex without fingerprints.
Posted on Reply
#13
BlueFalcon
D007, post: 3495551, member: 36880"
What ever happened to the days of super fast timings? lol.. And do these super high frequencies, translate into any real performance gain for gamers?
I've been told that since we hit the 2000 mark, it's all been pretty insignificant in terms of gains. Is that accurate?
Skylake is the first modern Intel architecture that benefits greatly from faster memory. As long as you shift the bottleneck to the CPU (i.e., 980Ti SLI when paired with a 6700K @ 4.5Ghz+), DDR4 3200-4000mhz kits show excellent scaling in CPU limited gaming scenarios. There are also certain apps that perform better with faster DDR4 kits.

http://www.techspot.com/article/1171-ddr4-4000-mhz-performance/

Latency on the other hand doesn't matter that much since both AMD and Intel shifted to the integrated memory controllers (IMC) after the C2D era. Right now it seems 16GB DDR4 3200 is the sweet spot as such kits can be found on Newegg for $68-80. The next level up is DDR4 3466 which tends to sell for $100-110.

* It makes sense why in the past you were gunning for CL4-4-4 timings as Pentium 4/D and Core 2 Duo still did not have an IMC which introduced a latency penalty that lower CL memory compensated for.

Patriot will need to be more competitive on the pricing though as G.Skill Trident 16GB DDR4 3733 CL 17-17-17 kit is $159.99
Posted on Reply
#14
D007
BlueFalcon, post: 3497508, member: 161577"
Skylake is the first modern Intel architecture that benefits greatly from faster memory. As long as you shift the bottleneck to the CPU (i.e., 980Ti SLI when paired with a 6700K @ 4.5Ghz+), DDR4 3200-4000mhz kits show excellent scaling in CPU limited gaming scenarios. There are also certain apps that perform better with faster DDR4 kits.

http://www.techspot.com/article/1171-ddr4-4000-mhz-performance/

Latency on the other hand doesn't matter that much since both AMD and Intel shifted to the integrated memory controllers (IMC) after the C2D era. Right now it seems 16GB DDR4 3200 is the sweet spot as such kits can be found on Newegg for $68-80. The next level up is DDR4 3466 which tends to sell for $100-110.

* It makes sense why in the past you were gunning for CL4-4-4 timings as Pentium 4/D and Core 2 Duo still did not have an IMC which introduced a latency penalty that lower CL memory compensated for.

Patriot will need to be more competitive on the pricing though as G.Skill Trident 16GB DDR4 3733 CL 17-17-17 kit is $159.99
Awesome.. Really cleared up a lot for me.. Thank you.
Posted on Reply
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