Monday, February 6th 2017

AMD's Upcoming Ryzen to Prompt HT-enabled i5 from Rival Intel

AMD's upcoming Ryzen chips probably represent the hardware world's most awaited shake-up in recent times (and I do know I've been mentioning this non-stop, but please, do bear with me here). The thought that the underdog could finally present an actual alternative - at least performance-wise - to its Goliath of a rival - and thus introducing renewed competition in a bogged-down hardware segment and the democratization of high-quality processing cores - is simply too good to not gobble down like water given to a desert nomad. I, for one, hope that AMD can deliver, prompting a better competitive - and pricing - environment for all of us.

And it would seem that Intel is looking to staunch an eventual bleeding that AMD's Ryzen chips might instill to their CPU line-up, with its expected 4-core, 8-thread, 6-core 12-thread, and 8-core, 16-thread Ryzen processors, by shaking up its - now ancient - line-up of Core processors. Intel has already introduced some changes to its line with the release of Kaby Lake - with some Celeron processors carrying Hyper Threading, previously locked to their i3 processors, and the first unlocked-multiplier Core i3-7350K processor, but apparently the company feels that isn't enough for Ryzen's expected performance - enter the Core i7-7740K and the Core i5-7640K.
According to some industry sources, Intel is preparing these two CPU solutions as a containment attempt for AMD's Ryzen onslaught. First up, we have the i7-7740K, which is your run-of the mill Core i7, increasingly fleshing out the i7 line of Intel processors. It supposedly carries 8 MB of L3 cache, and sports a base frequency at 4.30 GHz (100 MHz higher than the 7700K), but a 9W higher TDP (at 100W when compared to the 91W of the i7-7700K. The Turbo frequency is still up in the air, but logic points to it being at the 4.60 GHz (again, 100 MHz higher than that of the i7-7700K). Honestly, this is just another Intel processor, with a slight frequency bump and probably a disproportionate increase in the price-tag, and I don't feel it offers that much more in a fight against AMD.

The i5-7640K, however, could be another beast entirely. Take this with a truckload of salt, obviously, but this part (which is confirmed to be upcoming) can feature HyperThreading (according to some sources; there are conflicting reports on this one). All other features are on par with the i5-7600K: 6 MB L3, 4.00 GHz base frequency (a meatier 200 MHz boost over the i5-7600K's 3.80 GHz). On the TDP side, it would also climb above the 100W mark. But the HyperThreading is what's interesting: it would be the first time an i5 would carry that particular piece of technology, thus throwing a proverbial wrench into Intel's pretty (if uninteresting) line-up of processors. After all, every consumer knows that what separates the i7 from the i5 is the HyperThreading... Or is it now?

If true, this is a bold, bold move for a typically conservative (and rightly so; when you're the best and there's no competition it's hard to find the motivation to innovate just for the sake of it, considering you'll be outselling the competition as it is) company. I personally don't expect the part to have HTT - I think it's just too much of a shake-up to Intel's line-up, a show of blood in the water, if you may - and would expect a mere frequency bump over the i5-7600K. But if Intel does do this shake-up, it comes a year earlier than I expected, and is sure to stir up the pot of competition something fierce. We'll probably have answers on this by the end of the week, though, supposedly the time where hardware partners will begin sampling the new processors.Source: CPCHardware
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50 Comments on AMD's Upcoming Ryzen to Prompt HT-enabled i5 from Rival Intel

#1
diatribe
It seems to me that adding Hyper-Threading to an i5 would cause unneeded competition between two Intel processors. What spend extra on an i7 if you can get the i5 for less? What we all would like to see is some 6 or 8 core 1151 processors from Intel.
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#2
Dj-ElectriC
Raevenlord said:
first time an i5 would carry that particular piece of technology
Besides the i5 600 series of desktop CPUs, of course
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#3
badmau5
Lets finally see some blue blood. Intel has been slacking lately.
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#4
Hotobu
More and more circumstantial evidence that Ryzen is gonna be good. Even if it's slightly worse I'll still buy a Ryzen setup for the sake of competition.
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#5
RealNeil
Competition is the spice of life. It is what makes buying PC parts livable for us plebes.
Smack them down and drag them through the mud of humility!!
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#6
RejZoR
diatribe said:
It seems to me that adding Hyper-Threading to an i5 would cause unneeded competition between two Intel processors. What spend extra on an i7 if you can get the i5 for less? What we all would like to see is some 6 or 8 core 1151 processors from Intel.
i7 should move from silly 4C/8T config like 2 years ago... So, i5 gaining HT would make sense. If i7 was 6 core by default, topping 12 threads.
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#7
RealNeil
AMD's market saturation is a great idea based on two factors.

First: The performance has to be there.

Second: They have to (really have to) resist charging an arm and a leg for their parts.
If they pull an Intel and jerk us around, I'll just keep what I already have.

The sheer numbers of Ryzen CPUs on offer will put a lot of pressure on Intel, sparking price wars.
If there are two choices for me and the AMD Part is competitive at a better price, I'm buying AMD.
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#8
Joss
I start to feel somewhat excited, hope it's not a disappointment at the end.
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#9
theonedub
habe fidem
Dj-ElectriC said:
Besides the i5 600 series of desktop CPUs, of course
And low TDP versions of dual core i5 CPUs (the Haswell based i5 4750T comes to mind).
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#10
Camm
Reminds me of P4 Netburst and Pentium D's going against Athlons :P, except this time it isn't IPC, its core count :D.
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#11
efikkan
More is better, but these changes are so minor it's hardly even worth the discussion.
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#12
drade
efikkan said:
More is better, but these changes are so minor it's hardly even worth the discussion.
Could you clarify what changes are so minor? And more is better? Are you talking about the Ryzen lineup selection?
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#13
efikkan
drade said:
Could you clarify what changes are so minor? And more is better? Are you talking about the Ryzen lineup selection?
A 2% and 5% bump in clock frequency has to be considered minor, even though it's of course better. It's not enough to really matter regardless of the competition.
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#14
rruff
diatribe said:
It seems to me that adding Hyper-Threading to an i5 would cause unneeded competition between two Intel processors.
The i7 4C,8T will just be the faster and better binned part.

If you look at their laptop processors the i3, i5, i7 designations are much less clear cut. For instance there is an i7 with only 2C,4T, and others with 4C,8T.

Glad to see that AMD is finally making Intel offer something new for a change.
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#15
FYFI13
Raevenlord said:
some Celeron Pentium processors carrying Hyper Threading, previously locked to their i3 processors
*Cough cough* :)
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#16
Hodo
I remember way back when we still had horse and buggy how AMD shook Intel by the throat with 64 bit processing and athlon. It seems with Ryzen it's the same deal. So my question is can AMD truly continue and sustain the momentum with new products? Sure, they have these spurts of genius but can they truly compete with Intel, Qualcomm etc. I certainly don't believe AMD could possibly survive another high with product delivery (I.e. Athlon, Ryzen) and then crash and then try to recover as they are trying now.
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#17
Camm
Hodo said:
I remember way back when we still had horse and buggy how AMD shook Intel by the throat with 64 bit processing and athlon. It seems with Ryzen it's the same deal. So my question is can AMD truly continue and sustain the momentum with new products? Sure, they have these spurts of genius but can they truly compete with Intel, Qualcomm etc. I certainly don't believe AMD could possibly survive another high with product delivery (I.e. Athlon, Ryzen) and then crash and then try to recover as they are trying now.
Minus the somewhat silly implementation of HBCC on Vega (from the looks its a colossal waste of die space for a benefit that can't be realised yet), I think AMD in general is starting to pare back its more '5 years into the future but not exactly useful now' architectural choices.
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#18
R0H1T
Anyone still think the unlocked KL i3 is a good buy :rolleyes:
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#19
Sempron Guy
first they killed the i3, now they are planning to kill the i7 :confused:
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#20
XiGMAKiD
If this rumor is true (which means right now Intel is in some sort of Plan B mode) I guess it's safe to say that Ryzen is gonna be good afterall
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#21
ShurikN
XiGMAKiD said:
If this rumor is true (which means right now Intel is in some sort of Plan B mode) I guess it's safe to say that Ryzen is gonna be good afterall
I have no doubt Ryzen is gonna be a good product performance wise. But how good overall it'll be will be determined by the price. Something we have zero info about (aside some sketchy rumors).
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#22
Chaitanya
Those new CPU additions if true are a kneejerk reaction to competition. :shadedshu:
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#23
XiGMAKiD
ShurikN said:
I have no doubt Ryzen is gonna be a good product performance wise. But how good overall it'll be will be determined by the price. Something we have zero info about (aside some sketchy rumors).
About price I'm pretty sure it's gonna be close (but still cheaper) to Intel's counterpart with comparable performance since in this "Plan B" Intel is trying to fill every gap in their product line by creating new high (7740K) and low (G4560), otherwise they will simply go with their "Plan C" that is lowering the price (which unlikely)
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#24
Ebo
To me it sounds just like #23 said, Intel is with these 2 new products covering all the last holes in the bucket, until Ryzen is revealed officially and we can see for real what it can do.

The hype is only going to be stronger this month until March, if AMD delivers on both preformance and price, they have the full momentum until at least in the fall.
All of that will be good for consumers providing they can keep up with the demand.
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#25
Assimilator
Honestly doubt Intel will dilute the desktop i7 brand by pushing HT down to the i5s, even if it is the "top" i5 part. Would be much more interested in seeing an i5-7400K.
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