Thursday, February 9th 2017

Intel Announces the Xeon E7-8894 v4 Processor

Intel today extended the performance capabilities of the Intel Xeon processor E7-8800 v4 product family with the addition of a high-performance SKU in the processor family's Advanced SKU stack. The new SKU delivers the processor family's highest performance to handle the most demanding, mission-critical enterprise workloads. Businesses can use Intel Xeon processor E7-8894 v4-based servers to derive faster insights from the unprecedented amount of data being generated to create new services and improve customer experiences.

The Intel Xeon processor E7-8894 v4 combines high memory capacity and compute performance to deliver quicker results and improved productivity. The processor is targeted at scale-up workloads such as large databases, enterprise resource planning (ERP), customer relationship management (CRM), online transaction processing (OLT) and in-memory analytics. The ability to scale-up allows more resources (more sockets and more memory) to be added to a single node image.
Since its introduction in June 2016, the 14nm-based Intel Xeon processor E7-8800/4400 v4 family has delivered sustained and sizable improvements in instructions-per-cycle (IPC). Architectural and process improvements since Westmere EX E7-8800 processor family deliver up to 3.69x performance gains compared to the previous generation1,2, which provide enterprises an opportunity for refresh and TCO optimization through server consolidation. Intel continues to push innovation and process improvements with Intel Xeon processor E7-8894 v4, which has captured several record-breaking results based on key performance benchmarks, including SAP SD 2-Tier, SPECjbb 2015, SPECcpu2006, LINPACK and SAP BW edition on SAP HANA.

To meet the increasing demands for 24x7x365 days availability and uptime for mission-critical systems, the processor has RAS capabilities on Intel Run Sure Technology. These features are unique to the Intel Xeon processor E7 E7-8800 v4 family to reduce unplanned downtime, increase data integrity and reduce costs associated with lost revenue and service/maintenance.

The Intel Xeon processor E7-8894 v4 supports 4 to 8 sockets (up to 32 sockets via node controller) with configurations supporting up to 24 processing cores and up to 24 terabytes (TB) of memory per socket to boost in-memory analytics and achieve actionable insights in real-time.
Add your own comment

19 Comments on Intel Announces the Xeon E7-8894 v4 Processor

#1
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
How curious it still only turbos to 3.4ghz same speed as the 8890v4, wonder if there is a TDP issue.
Posted on Reply
#2
TheGuruStud
cdawall said:
How curious it still only turbos to 3.4ghz same speed as the 8890v4, wonder if there is a TDP issue.
24 cores and 60 MB of cache...that's going to eat some power lol
Posted on Reply
#3
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
TheGuruStud said:
24 cores and 60 MB of cache...that's going to eat some power lol
Yes, but what is the point of upgrading if there is no turbo gain? The chip is like $1000 more for the a 200mhz base clock boost and the same turbo.
Posted on Reply
#4
chaosmassive
Intel's QRF is working on damage control right now
Posted on Reply
#5
TheGuruStud
cdawall said:
Yes, but what is the point of upgrading if there is no turbo gain? The chip is like $1000 more for the a 200mhz base clock boost and the same turbo.
I guess there's enough fortune 500s buying the highest end chips without even caring, idk.
Posted on Reply
#6
Rivage
$8898.00 - ok. But will it run Crysis?
Posted on Reply
#7
P4-630
The Way It's Meant to be Played
TheGuruStud said:
I guess there's enough fortune 500s buying the highest end chips without even caring, idk.
I heard Trump ordered a few of these...
Posted on Reply
#8
Grings
cdawall said:
Yes, but what is the point of upgrading if there is no turbo gain? The chip is like $1000 more for the a 200mhz base clock boost and the same turbo.
running heavily multithreaded stuff wont use turbo clocks, so i guess there is a real benefit for some

still looks a bum deal, and youre probably right on the tdp limiting the turbo
Posted on Reply
#9
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
TheGuruStud said:
I guess there's enough fortune 500s buying the highest end chips without even caring, idk.
That is what I am guessing

Grings said:
running heavily multithreaded stuff wont use turbo clocks, so i guess there is a real benefit for some

still looks a bum deal, and youre probably right on the tdp limiting the turbo
I am sure that is it any gain even if negligible to most makes a difference to the some.
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
cdawall said:
Yes, but what is the point of upgrading if there is no turbo gain? The chip is like $1000 more for the a 200mhz base clock boost and the same turbo.
I doubt anyone upgrades from 8890 to 8894. This is just another option for those building new systems.
Posted on Reply
#11
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
bug said:
I doubt anyone upgrades from 8890 to 8894. This is just another option for those building new systems.
I have seen oil companies swap for smaller differences :roll:
Posted on Reply
#12
TheGuruStud
cdawall said:
I have seen oil companies swap for smaller differences :roll:
Must have been spending our tax money.
Posted on Reply
#13
jihadjoe
TheGuruStud said:
24 cores and 60 MB of cache...that's going to eat some power lol
I remember my old DOS-era computers. The Power Management chip alone on this thing could probably run most stuff better than a 386. The L1 and L2 is bigger than the total amount of RAM we had then, and the L3 is bigger than old hard drives.
Posted on Reply
#14
TheGuruStud
jihadjoe said:
I remember my old DOS-era computers. The Power Management chip alone on this thing could probably run most stuff better than a 386. The L1 and L2 is bigger than the total amount of RAM we had then, and the L3 is bigger than old hard drives.
I played sim city on 2 and 386s. I'm getting old.
Posted on Reply
#15
lilunxm12
cdawall said:
Yes, but what is the point of upgrading if there is no turbo gain? The chip is like $1000 more for the a 200mhz base clock boost and the same turbo.
Assume turbo boost works the same on E7 as E5/i7, then intel may raise the boost clock for 24c but leave the single-core boost clock(which barely make sense) as is. If there's a 200 mhz increment in 24c boost clock, then the price premium is somewhat justifiable.
Posted on Reply
#16
Cybrnook2002
The processor is nice, but again intel (and HW vendors), at least here in the SAP HANA space it's ALL about memory. Our bare metal 4 socket SAP certified hardware is still limited to 4TB. All the cores don't mean squat if I can't scale.
Posted on Reply
#18
Tom.699
Why do we need to know about this?
5 companies in the world who can afford to buy this will surely find out by themselves (or will be fed with it by their supplier).
Posted on Reply
#19
Toothless
Tom.699 said:
Why do we need to know about this?
5 companies in the world who can afford to buy this will surely find out by themselves (or will be fed with it by their supplier).
Why not? It's tech news from a big brand.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment