Wednesday, May 3rd 2017

Meet Microsoft's New Take on Windows: The Windows 10 S

The "RT" ghost is still alive in people's minds, as is particularly fluent on people's tongues whenever someone brings up Microsoft's new Windows 10 S OS. The one that limits the scope and variety of applications you can run on your own system. That forces you to go through Windows' still lackluster Store (sorry, but I've never seen such bad flow, bugs and hiccups on an app as I do in that one.)

It's only right, really - the reduced compatibility and walled-garden approach is there still, even if this one OS now isn't limited to ARM - or to x86, for that matter. This new approach now allows both UWP apps and Win32 apps which have been ported using Desktop Bridge from the store to work. However, expect Win32 apps with a native, non-ported installer to fail. Not all is bad, though: Windows has an amazing backlog for legacy hardware, software and applications, but that same legacy means it's more opened up to security vulnerabilities, and even applications which can wreak havoc on the system with excessive permissions, and unpatched issues.
The goal here, Microsoft states, is to offer a more closed-off environment for those clients that need it, limiting the amount of applications that can run on hardware equipped with its newest OS. And there truly is need, and use cases, for such an environment. Businesses will likely start using this one version of Windows, looking towards a more uniform and consistent experience and further lock-down its devices. Public services, on the other hand, which usually brew their own applications or pay specialized companies to design them, won't have much use for such an OS.

UWP apps and ported Win32 apps offer more predictable, streamlined and tested behavior, which would likely mean more consistent performance, better battery life, and improved security. The main target segment of the new Windows 10 version, however, is the education market, which has been dominated by Chromebooks. In order to bypass the limitation, a $50 upgrade can be purchased to get Windows 10 Pro, so at least there is some way to abandon the garden. Though this is an interesting product that will certainly cater to some particular use cases, I'd say it's certain that none of our good readers will be looking towards this Windows 10 implementation.

For that matter, it's also not restricted to x86 laptops, and it would make sense to see Windows 10 S available on ARM based PCs coming later this year.Source: ETeknix, AnandTech
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13 Comments on Meet Microsoft's New Take on Windows: The Windows 10 S

#1
alucasa
Windows 10 Sadist version.
Posted on Reply
#2
AntDeek
Windows meets Chrome OS
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#3
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I can't name one business that could survive off of Windows Store alone. Most businesses buy Windows to run x86 and x86-64 native productivity programs.
Posted on Reply
#4
john_
FordGT90Concept said:
I can't name one business that could survive off of Windows Store alone. Most businesses buy Windows to run x86 and x86-64 native productivity programs.
Businesses would not touch this version, Not only buy x86 software, they even create their own custom software. But schools are a totally different category. For example, who wants 300 teenagers messing with 50 systems every day?
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#5
Camm
On one hand, I like the approach. On the other, you can see the slow march of Microsoft trying to lock down its system going into the future.
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#6
jmcslob
Camm said:
On one hand, I like the approach. On the other, you can see the slow march of Microsoft trying to lock down its system going into the future.
Right... Like one day we are going to be putting out guides on how to side load the apps you want for windows...

The masses are dumb and the masses want dumb shit.
Posted on Reply
#7
Gundem
jmcslob said:
Right... Like one day we are going to be putting out guides on how to side load the apps you want for windows...

The masses are dumb and the masses want dumb shit.
Haha! So true.
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#9
XiGMAKiD
Windows 10 S(illy) Edition
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#10
craigo
Baked in SOE ready for cloud based enterprise.. doesn't sound silly to me.
I thought Dell bought WYSE though, not Microsoft..
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#11
Prima.Vera
alucasa said:
Windows 10 Sadist version.
Neh, just Windows Sucks version.
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#13
3rold
This is a good approach for new users, I mean the access to stuff is so limited here, it's virtually impossible to screw this kind of installation up. I would use it only on older netbooks, just to test it, I wouldn't like it as a daily driver, especially for the fact that there are a lot of Linux distros that work flawlessly on 15-20 year old PCs.

Edit: What I don't agree at all with M$ is the fact that they are now selling Surface "Tabtops" with mediocre specs at premium prices with this limited OS. At my University the professors and a lot of my classmates use the older versions, and they are pretty cool IMO, but they are not limited from an OS which (for Computer Science students) is basically a social media OS, not a productivity one.
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