Tuesday, August 29th 2017

PCI-SIG: PCIe 4.0 in 2017, PCIe 5.0 in 2019

After years of continued innovation in PCIe's bandwidth, we've hit somewhat of a snag in recent times; after all, the PCIe 3.0 specification has been doing the rounds on our motherboards ever since 2010. PCI-SIG, the 750-member strong organization that's in charge of designing the specifications for the PCIe bus, attribute part of this delay to industry stagnation: PCIe 3.0 has simply been more than enough, bandwidth-wise, for many generations of hardware now. Only recently, with innovations in storage mediums and innovative memory solutions, such as NVMe SSDs and Intel's Optane, are we starting to hit the ceiling on what PCIe 3.0 offers. Add to that the increased workload and bandwidth requirements of the AI field, and the industry now seems to be eager for an upgrade, with some IP vendors even having put out PCIe 4.0-supporting controllers and PHYs into their next-generation products already - although at the incomplete 0.9 revision.
However, PCIe 4.0, with its doubled 64 GB/s bandwidth to PCie 3.0's comparably paltry 32 GB/s (yet more than sufficient for the average consumer), might be short lived in our markets. PCI-SIG is setting its sights on 2019 as the year for finalizing the PCIe 5.0 specifications; the conglomerate has accelerated its efforts on the 128 GB/s specification, which has already achieved revision 0.3, with an expected level of 0.5 by the end of 2017. Remember that a defined specification doesn't naturally and immediately manifest into products; AMD themselves are only pegging PCIe 4.0 support by 2020, which makes sense, considering the AM4 platform itself has been declared by the company has being supported until that point in time. AMD is trading the latest and greatest for platform longevity - though should PCIe 5.0 indeed be finalized by 2019, it's possible the company could include it in their next-generation platform. Intel, on the other hand, has a much faster track record of adopting new technologies on its platforms; whether Intel's yearly chipset release and motherboard/processor incompatibility stems from this desire to support the latest and greatest or as a way to sell more motherboards with each CPU generation is a matter open for debate. However, considering Intel's advances with more exotic memory subsystems such as Optane, a quicker adoption of new PCIe specifications is to be expected from the company.
Source: Tom's Hardware
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31 Comments on PCI-SIG: PCIe 4.0 in 2017, PCIe 5.0 in 2019

#27
R0H1T
Slavko, post: 3718694, member: 173943"
If the difference in performance are like difference between pcie 2.0 and pcie 3.0, then there is no point in the new standard.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/pci-express-3-0-vs-2-0-gaming-performance-gain/4/
Very little to do with actual standard, rather the hardware that can make use of it. As was mentioned earlier, 100G ethernet, Optane, 4x Titan X(x) & so many other devices will probably need something like 16x PCIe 5.0 in the future.
Gaming gains are minimal but there are already many other devices that have the potential to saturate the current PCIe 3.0 bus on regular desktops.
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#28
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
R0H1T, post: 3718698, member: 131092"
Very little to do with actual standard, rather the hardware that can make use of it. As was mentioned earlier, 100G ethernet, Optane, 4x Titan X(x) & so many other devices will probably need something like 16x PCIe 5.0 in the future.
Gaming gains are minimal but there are already many other devices that have the potential to saturate the current PCIe 3.0 bus on regular desktops.
Exactly what though???
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#30
JES
EarthDog, post: 3717906, member: 79836"
2.0 8x takes a hit of 4%, 2.0 4x takes a hit of 16%... etc...I'd clarify and say 2.0 16x is still ok. :)
It depends a lot on the game. The last figures I saw from benchmark articles were from years back, so they are not valid any longer with today's GPU power. On my old PCI-E 2.0 rig I noticed a big bottleneck in many games when I had plugged my GTX 1050 Ti to an x8 slot mistakenly. Also there are certain games that are bottlenecked by 2.0 x16 as well, one of them is rFactor 2 (discussed here).
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#31
EarthDog
I quoted those values from here who used a gtx 1080. Yes, it varies by game...i used the overall average as listed in the results.
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