Monday, February 5th 2018

Microsoft Ends Windows 10 S as Standalone Product, Integrates With Ecosystem

Well, that didn't take long. Microsoft's Windows 10 S push as a "lite, free" version of its Windows 10 OS that would be available for education environments free of charge has been thoroughly abandoned as a standalone product. instead, Microsoft is now looking to integrate it into existing Windows 10 versions (Home and Pro) as a sort of sleeping, to-be-activated "S Mode" which has access to updates, but only has the same features as Windows 10 S currently does - the most important, limiting of which is that the OS only runs UWP (Universal windows Platform) apps. Thus, this mode will basically limit the Operating System to a version which, according to Microsoft, enables better security and a more friendly environment for the typical usage scenarios of such lite operating systems.

Naturally, Microsoft will still offer users the chance to upgrade to full Windows versions within S Mode - at a price. Moving from Windows 10 Home S to regular Windows Home will be free, but Pro S users who want to switch to the full version of Windows 10 Pro will have to pay $49. There will be Pro S commercial versions for Value, Entry, and Small Tablet models, but not Core+ and Workstations. There has been no official word from Microsoft on these software changes, though these will likely take place on the next partner pricing change announcement hailing form the Redmond company.
Sources: NeoWin, via TechSpot
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15 Comments on Microsoft Ends Windows 10 S as Standalone Product, Integrates With Ecosystem

#1
natr0n
Windows S is walledgarden mode.
Posted on Reply
#2
jateruy
After all, they better not start quietly downgrading the current Pro owners to Pro S and ask for 49.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheOne
I'm personally curious as to what they intend to do with the rumored Polaris build.
Posted on Reply
#4
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Just drop the S and just have Home Edition for schools
Posted on Reply
#5
Pjokerxp_
MicroShet is trying to monoply the ecosystem. so no Win32 cant be run on Windows S only Crappy UWP from window store
FAIL

SteamOS HELP US!
Posted on Reply
#6
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Pjokerxp_ said:
MicroShet is trying to monoply the ecosystem. so no Win32 cant be run on Windows S only Crappy UWP from window store
FAIL

SteamOS HELP US!
Good luck fighting a defacto os. Any unix/linux based os need wine to run majority of programs out there, which just add overhead to the os.
Posted on Reply
#7
Pjokerxp_
eidairaman1 said:
Good luck fighting a defacto os. Any unix/linux based os need wine to run majority of programs out there, which just add overhead to the os.
well, i guess this is my OS now








https://www.pcworld.com/article/3252103/windows/microsoft-making-windows-10-s-default-with-new-versions.html
Windows 10 S only allows UWP apps to be loaded from the Windows Store, locking out traditional Win32 .EXE files. (Thurrott.com noted, however, that these versions of Windows 10 S will apparently support third-party antivirus software, which traditionally runs as legacy .EXE versions.)
Posted on Reply
#8
StrayKAT
eidairaman1 said:
Just drop the S and just have Home Edition for schools
Kinda defeats the purpose. It was meant to be have only apps that were easily and remotely adminstered.

I'm not sure why any naysayers jumped in this thread... for the above reasons. It's mostly for kids and schools. They'd never use it to begin with. SteamOS? This is competing with Chromebooks.
Posted on Reply
#9
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
It makes sense though. They recuperate money for the OS via sales on the Windows Store.

Basically tablety Windows is free. Full function Windows is not. I don't have a problem with that.
Posted on Reply
#10
lexluthermiester
eidairaman1 said:
Good luck fighting a defacto os.
Right? Microsoft has an uphill battle on their hands with Android.
eidairaman1 said:
Any unix/linux based os need wine to run majority of programs out there, which just add overhead to the os.
WINE doesn't add much(if any) overhead. I've actually bench tested programs and games in native Windows Vs WINE and the difference is minimal.
Posted on Reply
#11
bug
Yet another proof of user's love for UWP :P
Posted on Reply
#12
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
If all you do is internet, Windows 10 S is sufficient. In fact, I know someone who Windows 10 S is perfect for. It would grant her the added security of being unable to run Win32 applications (because it's a liability more than a feature for her usage patterns) while still being able to do what she uses her computer for via the UWP Edge app.

I doubt anyone on this forum would willingly choose Windows 10 S over Windows 10 because we're power users but there are users out there that would be perfectly happy with Windows 10 S.
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#13
blobster21
Since when did educational environment imply zero freedom outside the mandatory UWP apps ?

This disgrace of an OS was bound to dissapear quickly, who in his right mind would ever consider Windows 10 S anyway ? for preschoolers maybe....
Posted on Reply
#15
Franzen4Real
Pjokerxp_ said:
well, i guess this is my OS now.


Looks like you simply chose the wrong version of Windows. Maybe educate yourself on a products use cases and intended market before you commit to it. Or, just unlock the full Win10 Home for free
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