Wednesday, April 18th 2018

CRYORIG Releases Full Copper C7 Cu Heatsink

After nearly a year from first announcing the Cu line of full copper coolers PC cooling innovator CRYORIG is now releasing the C7 Cu copper enhanced SFF ITX cooler. The C7 Cu is built from the award winning C7 architecture with one obvious upgrade, the extravagant use of copper for the whole heatsink body. By exchanging for a full copper build from aluminum has allowed the C7 Cu see improvements of up to 15% in thermal performance. The increased thermal performance without increased size is a key advantage of the C7 Cu especially in ultra compact SFF/ITX builds where space is limited.

Aimed at solving the space limits of Small Form Factor ITX systems, the C7 Cu was set with the task of further improving performance but without increasing size or fan speed. Utilizing higher thermal conductive materials was the only answer for the C7 Cu. Copper is nearly twice as thermal conductive as aluminum but nearly three times as expensive. That's why copper is normally only used on the most thermal critical components such as heatpipes and heatsink base plates. With the C7 Cu, CRYORIG has swapped out the aluminum elements of the C7 with pure copper. Thermal performance gains are close to 15% when compared to the original C7.
Built on the original C7 architecture, users can except to get the same features such as Zero Interference design on both Intel and AMD boards, included installation tool, and pre-installed 92mm PWM fan with integrated anti-vibration pads aimed for SFF/ITX systems. The 92mm fan features CRYORIG's Quad Air Intake system, with additional intakes are placed at the four corners of the fan. This allows the fan to pull air from the sides not just from the top, because in most SFF/ITX systems there's limited space for air intake between the top of the heatsink and the case side panel.

The C7 Cu is set to release in mid to late April in Asia and late May to early June in the USA and Europe. Pricing is set at MSRP 49.95 USD (-tax) in the USA and 49.95 (vat incl.) in Europe.
Heatsink Specifications
  • Dimension ( with fan ): L97 mm x W97 mm x H47 mm
  • Weight ( with fan ): 675g
  • Weight ( without fan ): 613 g
  • Heat pipes: 6mm heatpipe x 4 units Copper Heat pipes
  • Fin: T = 0.4 mm ; Gap = 1.2 mm
  • Fin Pcs: 57 pcs
  • Base and Fins: Pure Copper
  • RAM Height Limit: Limitless
  • Max TDP: 115 W
Fan Specifications
  • Dimension: L92 mm x W92 mm x H15 mm
  • Weight: 62 g
  • Rated Speed: 600 ~ 2500 RPM ±10 %
  • Noise Level: 30 dBA
  • Air Flow: 40.5 CFM
  • Air Pressure: 2.8 mm H2O
  • Current: 0.2 A
For more information, visit the product page.
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25 Comments on CRYORIG Releases Full Copper C7 Cu Heatsink

#1
_JP_
Woohooo! Back to 2006 brown, finger-stained styled coolers!!
Posted on Reply
#2
sutyi
More then double the weight and 66% more expensive for a <15% better cooling? Hmm...
Posted on Reply
#3
R0H1T
sutyi said:
More then double the weight and 66% more expensive for a <15% better cooling? Hmm...
So have you seen the reviews?
Posted on Reply
#4
sutyi
R0H1T said:
So have you seen the reviews?
Nope. Can read the article tho:
Thermal performance gains are close to 15% when compared to the original C7.
Posted on Reply
#5
Disparia
Nice to see it happen I suppose. Had already given up waiting for the Cu version and picked up the standard C7 a couple months back.
Posted on Reply
#6
dj-electric
Full copper never worked as intended.
Takes a lot of time for a fan to dissipate the heat out of the fins. Stick to aluminium, Cryorig.
Posted on Reply
#7
Harry Lloyd
Copper is the most beautiful thing in the world.
Posted on Reply
#8
Norton
Moderator & WCG-TPU Captain
dj-electric said:
Full copper never worked as intended.
Most copper heatsinks are coated to prevent them from oxidizing, this would definitely affect their performance
Posted on Reply
#9
dj-electric
The coating does some impact, The most of it comes from copper's inability to release it so quick like Alu does.
Posted on Reply
#10
IceShroom
dj-electric said:
The coating does some impact, The most of it comes from copper's inability to release it so quick like Alu does.
I think you have wrong idea about thermal conductivity(TV).
A material with high thermal conductivity will relase heat quickly, then a less thermal conductive material.
Copper has TV of 401, Aluminium has TV of 237.
Transferring same amount of heat Aluminium will store 1.69 time more heat than Copper.
Posted on Reply
#11
Folterknecht
sutyi said:
More then double the weight and 66% more expensive for a <15% better cooling? Hmm...
In a normal tower without that much demand for cooling sure. But in a SFF build (upt to ...)15% better colling might be worth the investment. Ofc proper reviews are needed at this point to check the claims.
Posted on Reply
#12
dj-electric
IceShroom said:
Transferring same amount of heat Aluminium will store 1.69 time more heat than Copper.
A great example of this is the TRUE120. There was a copper version of it and it performed similar or worse because of that. The amount of conventional air that came through it couldn't release the heat fast enough into the air. This isn't about what thermally conducts better, but how it can handle air cooling

I would say that a copper heatsink would be good when you push a nice amount of air through it
Posted on Reply
#13
sutyi
Folterknecht said:
In a normal tower without that much demand for cooling sure. But in a SFF build (upt to ...)15% better colling might be worth the investment. Ofc proper reviews are needed at this point to check the claims.
If you are thermal throttling sure, but then again if you are throttling with a stock CPU with the regular C7 variant, your case choice might be questionable.

If that is not the case and you are overclocking, then SFF might not be the best form factor for that.

On regular use I would rather buy a small tube of Kryonaut to use instead of the bundled TIM and call it a day.
Posted on Reply
#14
IceShroom
dj-electric said:
A great example of this is the TRUE120. There was a copper version of it and it performed similar or worse because of that. The amount of conventional air that came through it couldn't release the heat fast enough into the air. This isn't about what thermally conducts better, but how it can handle air cooling

I would say that a copper heatsink would be good when you push a nice amount of air through it
Link please about TRUE120.
Posted on Reply
#15
Casecutter
If I wanted a upgrade cooler (well really mandatory) on say that ASRock DeskMini GTX1060 that was just reviewed this would be a nice pick.

I think copper will release heat better overall, but it's a juggle; as to how thin they want and to many the fins, how they interface them to the tubes and slug, how close they pack them, and ultimately how much air they can pass through that. Honestly, it takes much more time and dedication to manufacture, higher cost in materials... so yea this price is higher for the gains presented, but in this compact form/noise etc. is there a better performing H/S with a better cost?

Here it looks like they just ran the same gauge, number of fins and interface copying the aluminum fin in copper so with that this is all you really get 15% for change nothing except to copper material in the fins.
Posted on Reply
#17
IceShroom
dj-electric said:
https://www.hardocp.com/article/2008/11/19/thermalright_ultra_extreme_copper_cpu_cooler_review/

Others seems to find it on par or a little bit better than the normal version.
I'm guessing that calling it "worse" was not right on my part. But, the difference for the cost, insane weight and more just didn't make sense
As I said higher thermal conductive material will dissipate heat better. In that review, Copper Ture120 was better than the Aluminium by 2°C.
But can agree about the price. Not paying 50%+ more for 2-5°C better temperature.
Posted on Reply
#18
R0H1T
dj-electric said:
A great example of this is the TRUE120. There was a copper version of it and it performed similar or worse because of that. The amount of conventional air that came through it couldn't release the heat fast enough into the air. This isn't about what thermally conducts better, but how it can handle air cooling

I would say that a copper heatsink would be good when you push a nice amount of air through it
So we need better air flow/fans as compared to the aluminium version. I don't see how Cu models wouldn't be better, with appropriate cooling.
The fan for this is barely doing 40CFM so a little extra air (flow) could go a long way in making the cooler shine.
Posted on Reply
#19
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
well played CRYORIG, make full cooper of one of their simplest and low performer coolers, nice play indeed !
Posted on Reply
#20
hyp36rmax
_JP_ said:
Woohooo! Back to 2006 brown, finger-stained styled coolers!!
Bring on 2006! That raw CU is legit :)



Back on topic, I would love to see how this performs in a Dr Zaber Sentry and 2400G
Posted on Reply
#21
Supercrit
peche said:
well played CRYORIG, make full cooper of one of their simplest and low performer coolers, nice play indeed !
It looks like a low profile cooler for those who want to fit a decent cooler that doesn't take much space.
Posted on Reply
#22
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Id like to see an Ashura Copper from Scythe, or a Macho Copper from Thermalright.
Posted on Reply
#23
SteveS45
The reason why the C7 was chosen to get the Cu treatment is specifically because of the size/height limits of SFF/ITX builds. Naturally going full copper will not be as cost efficient as per say choosing a larger cooler with more fins and heat dissipation area. But given that there's no space to do that in SFF/ITX PC's, choosing a more costly, higher heat conductive material is a trade off that seems to make sense. If you're buying a C7 Cu to cool a full ATX Tower... I don't think you're making the right choices, but thanks for supporting CRYORIG!
Posted on Reply
#24
Daisho
They still need to make an adapter/fanclips for the C7 so we can use different 92mm or 120mm fans.
Posted on Reply
#25
CheapMeat
I was waiting to see if their copper line up would ever actually come out. This is great. I know most don't care about paying more for a few less C's but still, what a cool option.
Posted on Reply
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