Wednesday, April 18th 2018

Western Digital Announces New Ultrastar DC HC530 14TB Hard Drive

Enabling new lower levels of total cost of ownership (TCO) for cloud and enterprise customers, Western Digital Corporation today introduced the Ultrastar DC HC530 hard drive - at 14TB, no other CMR (conventional magnetic recording) hard drive in the industry offers a higher capacity. The breadth and depth of big data is driving the universal need for higher capacities across a broad spectrum of applications and workloads. Built on Western Digital's fifth-generation HelioSeal technology, the Ultrastar DC HC530 drive is designed for public and private cloud environments where storage density, watt/TB and $/TB are critical parameters for creating the most cost-efficient infrastructure.

The data explosion caused by big data, IoT, artificial intelligence, machine learning, rich content and fast data applications is challenging hyperscale cloud data centers and enterprises to efficiently build massive petabyte-scale infrastructures. This ability to cost-effectively scale-up or scale-out is business critical, not only for cloud service providers but for organizations leveraging big data analytics and machine learning in medical, science, agriculture and other fields seeking innovation, discoveries and unique insights, as well as for creating new business models.
Brendan Collins, vice president of marketing, Devices, Western Digital, said, "Our enterprise and hyperscale cloud customers demand reliability with the highest capacities and densities to deliver the lowest TCO for business-critical applications. Having invented, brought to market and delivered five generations of industry-leading innovations in helium technology, and with more than 27 million drives shipped, our ability to maintain high quality and reliability have made us the trusted partner of top-tier cloud providers, Internet giants and OEMs around the world."

A follow-on to the industry's first 14TB SMR (shingled magnetic recording) drive, the Ultrastar DC HC530 is a 14TB CMR drive that delivers drop-in simplicity for random write workloads in enterprise and cloud data centers. Since 2014, the company's unique, patented HelioSeal process seals helium in the drive to provide unbeatable capacity, exceptional power efficiency and long-term data center reliability. Its low-power design does not compromise performance, while contributing to its overall TCO advantages. Both SAS and SATA interfaces will be available.

Tencent, a leading global Internet service provider based in China is adopting Western Digital's HelioSeal-based hard drives for their Tencent Cloud data centers. Huang Bing Qi, director of Tencent Cloud, said, "As the volume of data continues to expand, our customers look to us to provide speed, agility and longevity for a variety of applications, workloads and outcomes. Western Digital's helium-filled HDDs provide the low-power and high-capacity we need to meet these demands in a cost-efficient and reliable manner. Tencent Cloud has already deployed 12TB HelioSeal HDDs and we are excited to work with Western Digital to qualify the new 14TB Ultrastar DC HC530 drives."

Features and Specifications
  • HelioSeal: Western Digital's fifth generation helium-based drives, based on the exclusive HelioSeal technology
  • Available with either 12Gb/s SAS or 6Gb/s SATA interface
  • Two Dimensional Magnetic Recording (TDMR) and improved Dual Stage Micro Actuator provides optimal head positioning and rotational vibration robustness
  • Data Protection: Helps protect end user data with encryption (Self Encrypting Drive)
  • Reliability: Amongst the industry's highest MTBF rating at 2.5M hours and comes with a 5-year limited warranty
The Ultrastar DC HC530 14TB HDD is currently shipping to select hyperscale cloud customers for qualification.
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7 Comments on Western Digital Announces New Ultrastar DC HC530 14TB Hard Drive

#1
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
Nice spacious drive. I'll stick it in my PC, one partition, install Windows and store all my data in My Documents (I'll try to accumulate 14TB worth) no backup.

@newtekie1 Tell me what's wrong with this scenario. :p
Posted on Reply
#2
Octavean
Nice,....

I'd probably want about ~8 to ~16 of these drives for my storage needs. Naturally this would be used in a RAID array for redundancy. I'd need up to about 16 drives to have a complete backup of a primary RAID array. So RAID array 1 would be 8 drives in a RAID 5, RAID 6 or SHR / SHR2 array and array 2 would have the same attributes to serve as a backup.

I do this now with WD Red 8TB drives because they are the most cost effective for me.
Posted on Reply
#3
BadFrog
"Octavean said:
Nice,....

I'd probably want about ~8 to ~16 of these drives for my storage needs. Naturally this would be used in a RAID array for redundancy. I'd need up to about 16 drives to have a complete backup of a primary RAID array. So RAID array 1 would be 8 drives in a RAID 5, RAID 6 or SHR / SHR2 array and array 2 would have the same attributes to serve as a backup.

I do this now with WD Red 8TB drives because they are the most cost effective for me.
Just curious. What are you backing up thats 150tb+?
Posted on Reply
#4
yotano211
"BadFrog said:
Just curious. What are you backing up thats 150tb+?
I think the entire library of pronhub
Posted on Reply
#5
mohammed2006
"yotano211 said:
I think the entire library of pronhub
Hehehe. Ironically most convincing.
Posted on Reply
#6
Fx
I knew this announcement was imminent last Thursday when I say 10TB WD Reds at an all time low of $318 on Amazon.

So this means that sooner than later than later we will have 14TB WD Reds.

"Octavean said:
I do this now with WD Red 8TB drives because they are the most cost effective for me.
10TB WD Reds are very close to the same cost per TB. The cost per TB on this drive is going to be a premium for a long time so 10TB is the sweet spot.
Posted on Reply
#7
Octavean
"BadFrog said:
Just curious. What are you backing up thats 150tb+?
Various types of documents, photos (I have a Sony DSLR), home videos, recorded TV, full PC system backups (for restoration from catastrophic events) and so on.

Not to answer a question with a question but where are you getting that 150TB+ calculation from,....?

Actively I'm talking about two independent RAID arrays each consisting of 8x 8TB discs. So for one array its 8x 8TB = 64TB. With dual disc redundancy its 64TB - 16TB = 48TB. Formatted real world capacity is closer to about ~42TB. The data from RAID array 1 is the same as RAID array 2 so the totally usable capacity is unchanged at ~42TB.

Upgrading to 14TB discs would be nice (not going to do it now but it would be nice):

With 14TB drives it would be 8x 14TB = 112TB. With dual disc redundancy its 112TB - 28TB = 84TB. Formatted real world capacity would probably be about ~74TB. The second RAID array would be a duplicate so total capacity would be ~74TB.

150TB+,..... I wish.
Posted on Reply