Thursday, August 9th 2018

Intel "Whiskey Lake-U" Core Processor Lineup Detailed

Intel is giving final touches to its 9th generation Core "Whiskey Lake-U" processors for Ultrabooks and other ULV platforms. Successors to 8th Gen "Kaby Lake Refresh" chips, these 15-Watt SoCs may not pack a newer microarchitecture in terms of IPC increases, but Intel is building them on the latest iteration of its 14 nm node, along with tweaks made to their Turbo Boost algorithm, which combined with higher boost clocks, should offer better performance than the previous generation.

The lineup begins with the Core i3-8145U, successor to the i3-8130U. This 2-core/4-thread chip is has a lower nominal clock at 2.10 GHz (vs. 2.20 GHz of its predecessor), but significantly higher boost clocks of 3.90 GHz (vs. 3.40 GHz of the i3-8130U). The Core i5-8265U and top-end i7-8565U are both 4-core/8-thread chips with a nominal clocks of 1.60 GHz and 1.80 GHz, respectively. The i5-8265U has a boost clock of 4.10 GHz and 6 MB of L3 cache; while the i7-8565U tops that with 4.70 GHz boost clocks, and 8 MB of L3 cache. All three chips have 15W TDP, configurable to 25W by applying the "high performance" power scheme.
Source: Anandtech
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22 Comments on Intel "Whiskey Lake-U" Core Processor Lineup Detailed

#1
Pan
Damn, thats some high turbos! Will certainly help in making it more responsive and snappier, even if only for a short time.
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#2
Midland Dog
15w tdp with a 4.6ghz boost, faaarken hell, make all the 14nm++++++++++++ jokes you want, it obviously works
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#3
Durvelle27
Midland Dog said:
15w tdp with a 4.6ghz boost, faaarken hell, make all the 14nm++++++++++++ jokes you want, it obviously works
Well at only 1-2 cores it’s really not that impressive
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#4
Midland Dog
Durvelle27 said:
Well at only 1-2 cores it’s really not that impressive
considering that at the start 14nm wouldnt do 4.2 with 1.4vcore (5775c) then i would say its very impressive, i would love to see what an nvidia gpu would hit on intels 14nm
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#6
Hood
Midland Dog said:
15w tdp with a 4.6ghz boost, faaarken hell, make all the 14nm++++++++++++ jokes you want, it obviously works
Yes, Intel engineers learned a lot from all the failed 10nm attempts, took that knowledge and applied it to 14nm process, with good results. When they finally get done tweaking 10nm, it will be surprisingly robust, and persist for more generations than 14nm.
Posted on Reply
#7
Vayra86
Hood said:
Yes, Intel engineers learned a lot from all the failed 10nm attempts, took that knowledge and applied it to 14nm process, with good results. When they finally get done tweaking 10nm, it will be surprisingly robust, and persist for more generations than 14nm.
Reminds of Nvidia and their move with Maxwell cards. From the 750ti > 970 and then just porting that over to Pascal on a smaller node.
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#8
stimpy88
I can't wait until all these lakes of Intels dry up.
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#9
Shamalamadingdong
Midland Dog said:
15w tdp with a 4.6ghz boost, faaarken hell, make all the 14nm++++++++++++ jokes you want, it obviously works
I think you're misunderstanding something. It's 15W TDP at 1.8 GHz.

I wouldn't be surprised if it'll surpass 50W when running full boost.
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#10
TheGuruStud
Shamalamadingdong said:
I think you're misunderstanding something. It's 15W TDP at 1.8 GHz.

I wouldn't be surprised if it'll surpass 50W when running full boost.
Which is why these will instantly throttle after literally a few seconds to prevent meltdown. Ultrabooks still die from heat. The only useful application of these boost clocks is web page loading, since most are so bloated.
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#11
Toothless
I'd love to see one of these in an ITX build.
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#12
Vya Domus
Intel is getting very liberal with these "Turbo boost" figures. 4.6 Ghz in a 4c/8t 15W CPU ? For how long , a split second ?
Posted on Reply
#13
Caring1
Vya Domus said:
Intel is getting very liberal with these "Turbo boost" figures. 4.6 Ghz in a 4c/8t 15W CPU ? For how long , a split second ?
Probably 15W at idle.
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#14
jmcosta
lol its like people don't read the content of the news, it says right there "All three chips have 15W TDP, configurable to 25W by applying the high performance power scheme ". It means that at power saving (lower clocks) will have a TDP of 15W and at high performance mode the cpu wont be throttling and will have a TDP of 25W.
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#15
Brusfantomet
jmcosta said:
lol its like people don't read the content of the news, it says right there "All three chips have 15W TDP, configurable to 25W by applying the high performance power scheme ". It means that at power saving (lower clocks) will have a TDP of 15W and at high performance mode the cpu wont be throttling and will have a TDP of 25W.
A 7700k has boost at 4.5 GHz, at 91W "TDP", also built on 14 nm, whatever numbers of + the prosess used in Whiskey lake its not going to reduce power usage by 70% at 4.5 GHz
Posted on Reply
#16
RejZoR
Midland Dog said:
15w tdp with a 4.6ghz boost, faaarken hell, make all the 14nm++++++++++++ jokes you want, it obviously works
Of course it works. Process maturity also matters.
Posted on Reply
#17
R0H1T
jmcosta said:
lol its like people don't read the content of the news, it says right there "All three chips have 15W TDP, configurable to 25W by applying the high performance power scheme ". It means that at power saving (lower clocks) will have a TDP of 15W and at high performance mode the cpu wont be throttling and will have a TDP of 25W.
Oh wow when was the last time time you saw a decent (priced) ULV laptop with cTDP up at 25W :rolleyes:
It's like people live in a fantasy world where laptop makers, or Intel, aren't looking to cut corners o_O
Posted on Reply
#18
Nokiron
TheGuruStud said:
Which is why these will instantly throttle after literally a few seconds to prevent meltdown. Ultrabooks still die from heat. The only useful application of these boost clocks is web page loading, since most are so bloated.
I mean, there is a reason Intels race-to-idle and race-to-sleep works.
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#19
sepheronx
stimpy88 said:
I can't wait until all these lakes of Intels dry up.
Depending on the type of Whiskey, I think I can help dry that lake up pretty quickly.

jmcosta said:
lol its like people don't read the content of the news, it says right there "All three chips have 15W TDP, configurable to 25W by applying the high performance power scheme ". It means that at power saving (lower clocks) will have a TDP of 15W and at high performance mode the cpu wont be throttling and will have a TDP of 25W.
Still, at 25W, that is great.
Posted on Reply
#20
Midland Dog
Shamalamadingdong said:
I think you're misunderstanding something. It's 15W TDP at 1.8 GHz.

I wouldn't be surprised if it'll surpass 50W when running full boost.
nang, it will have a single core boost of 4.5 at 15w but multicore will be in the high 3s
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#21
Prima.Vera
Intel should put in the specs also the maximum length/time of the boost. ;) Before throttling down that is...
Posted on Reply
#22
hat
Enthusiast
Supposedly Intel doesn't even publish actual Turbo specs anymore. You just get an "up to" max turbo clock, which isn't guaranteed. It's a great way to artificially inflate numbers, making them more attractive to the underinformed... take a look at that i5 8400, for instance. It's a 65w, 2.8GHz processor, with a "Max Turbo" of 4GHz. The fun part of that is that TDP is measured at the base clock, so who knows what it's pulling at turbo speeds?
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