Monday, August 13th 2018

AMD Launches World's Most Powerful Desktop Processor: 2nd Generation Threadripper

AMD today announced the availability of world's most powerful desktop processor, the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX processor with 32 cores and 64 threads. Designed to power the ultimate computing experiences, 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are built using 12 nm "Zen+" x86 processor architecture and offer the most threads on any desktop processor with the flagship model delivering up to 53% greater performance than the competition's flagship model. Second Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors support the most I/O, and are compatible with existing AMD X399 chipset motherboards via a simple BIOS update, offering builders a broad choice for designing the ultimate high-end desktop or workstation PC.

"We created Ryzen Threadripper processors because we saw an opportunity to deliver unheard-of levels of multithreaded computing for the demanding needs of creators, gamers, and PC enthusiasts in the HEDT market," said Jim Anderson, senior vice president and general manager, Computing and Graphics Business Group, AMD. "With the 2nd Gen processor family we took that challenge to a whole new level - delivering the biggest, most powerful desktop processor the world has ever seen."
"AMD reinvigorated the PC market with the launch of Ryzen processors, bringing compelling new choices to buyers of performance PCs", said Alex Herrera, analyst and author of Jon Peddie Research's Workstation Report. "Now, with the 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper, AMD is doing the same for professionals, delivering potent new CPU options to serve the hefty performance demands of the workstation market."

Bigger, More Powerful Performance
AMD WX Series of processors offer class-leading core counts3, featuring the Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX with 32-core/64-threads and Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX with 24-core/48-threads. These are the embodiment of pure multi-core processing, purpose-built for prosumers who crave raw computational compute power to dispatch the heaviest workloads.
  • 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX delivers up to 53% faster multi-thread performance than the Core i9-7980XE1.
  • 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX offers up to 47% more rendering performance for creators than the Core i9-7980XE4.
AMD has enhanced the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper X Series with higher base and boost clocks offering enthusiasts, creators, gamers, and streamers who demand high performance with a beautiful smooth gaming experience; 16-core/32-thread 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X delivers up to 41% more multi-threaded performance than the Core i9-7900X.

Better Experience with 2nd Gen Ryzen Feature Set
2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors implement improved AMD SenseMI6 Technology with Precision Boost 2, and Extended Frequency Range 2 (XFR2) delivering the same generational performance uplifts seen on 2nd Gen Ryzen desktop processors. Additional performance and value are delivered for the enthusiast with:
  • AMD StoreMI Technology: All X399 platform customers will now have free access to AMD StoreMI Technology enabling configured PCs to load files, games, and applications from a high-capacity hard drive at SSD-like read speeds7.
  • Ryzen Master Utility: Like all AMD Ryzen processors, 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are fully unlocked8. With the updated AMD Ryzen Master Utility, AMD has added new features like fast core detection both on die and per-CCX, advanced hardware controls, and simple, one-click workload optimizations.
  • Precision Boost Overdrive (PBO)9: A new performance-enhancing feature that allows multi-threaded boost limits to be raised by tapping into extra power delivery headroom in premium motherboards.
Seamless Platform Compatibility
All 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are supported by a full ecosystem of exciting new motherboards and all existing X399 platforms with a simple BIOS update, with designs already available from top motherboard manufacturers including ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI.

Availability
The 32-core, 64-thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX is available today, Aug. 13, 2018, from global retailers and system integrators. The 16-core, 32-thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X processor is expected to launch on Aug.31, 2018 and the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX and 2920X models are slated for launch in October 2018.
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39 Comments on AMD Launches World's Most Powerful Desktop Processor: 2nd Generation Threadripper

#1
DeathtoGnomes
oh intel fanboi's are gonna have a field day in this thread. :shadedshu: 53% more fun.
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#2
Durvelle27
I wonder how they got the 16 Core to click higher than the 12 Core. I’d think the lower core model would click the best
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#3
Slizzo
I want to see overclocking performance. Anyone have the metrics for that yet?

@Durvelle27 16 core likely clocks better as it's 2 full dies. 12 core is 2x 6 core dies, likely that a core on each die was deemed ineffective and disabled.
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#4
ssdpro
That's a heck of a lot of PWN for $1800. But that is the problem; most of us used to balk at Intel's $999 now $1299 for premier HEDT parts. When I think $1800 I don't think consumer desktop. Unfortunately neither will most consumers.
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#5
nickbaldwin86
Will this processor be able to handle the new Doom coming out? or should I wait to upgrade after it comes out?

Also how many more frames will it get me in PUBG?
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#6
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
ssdpro said:
That's a heck of a lot of PWN for $1800. But that is the problem; most of us used to balk at Intel's $999 now $1299 for premier HEDT parts. When I think $1800 I don't think consumer desktop. Unfortunately neither will most consumers.
There's nothing unfortunate about it, consumer desktops have no business running this, just as they have no bussiness running anything HEDT.

Slizzo said:
I want to see overclocking performance. Anyone have the metrics for that yet?
From the reviews I've seen the 2990WX can hit 4Ghz on all cores ... but it lowers the single core performance slightly, as they boost higher on one core. It pulls like 600W though, and HardOCP reported 1000W at the wall running Prime95.
Posted on Reply
#7
HTC
ssdpro said:
That's a heck of a lot of PWN for $1800. But that is the problem; most of us used to balk at Intel's $999 now $1299 for premier HEDT parts. When I think $1800 I don't think consumer desktop. Unfortunately neither will most consumers.
Don't forget: less then one and a half years ago, you'd need to have payed just over $1700 for a 10 core 6950X. Now, for under $100 more, you can have 32 cores.

Frick said:
There's nothing unfortunate about it, consumer desktops have no business running this, just as they have no bussiness running anything HEDT.
100% agree.
Posted on Reply
#8
HimymCZe
Slizzo said:
I want to see overclocking performance. Anyone have the metrics for that yet?

@Durvelle27 16 core likely clocks better as it's 2 full dies. 12 core is 2x 6 core dies, likely that a core on each die was deemed ineffective and disabled.
VideoCardzcom already have an article with 2990WX@5,4Ghz, 1000+W, liquid nitogen <184°C scoring ~8400 in R15 making it 4th highest score EVER. 1st none-Xeon.
Posted on Reply
#9
altcapwn
nickbaldwin86 said:
Will this processor be able to handle the new Doom coming out? or should I wait to upgrade after it comes out?

Also how many more frames will it get me in PUBG?
That's not a gaming CPU.

You won't have more FPS because of the 32 threads as most game won't even use more than 4 threads.

For gaming, stick with Ryzen.
Posted on Reply
#10
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
altcapwn said:
That's not a gaming CPU.

You won't have more FPS because of the 32 threads as most game won't even use more than 4 threads.

For gaming, stick with Ryzen.
Pretty sure he was ironic.
Posted on Reply
#11
RejZoR
2950X seems to be the best option for gamers who also crunch data due to highest boost clock which will most likely be best utilized in most games.

Frick said:
There's nothing unfortunate about it, consumer desktops have no business running this, just as they have no bussiness running anything HEDT.


From the reviews I've seen the 2990WX can hit 4Ghz on all cores ... but it lowers the single core performance slightly, as they boost higher on one core. It pulls like 600W though, and HardOCP reported 1000W at the wall running Prime95.
Only people jealous of others running HEDT systems for gaming say that. Most consumers will pick X models anyway over WX. The Core i7 920 ensured it ran anything I threw at it perfectly like 6 years ago. Core i7 5820K pretty much ensures the same thing. I see no reason why 2950X wouldn't. It has higher IPC and basically clocks the same. But has shit tons of cores and by itself boosts to 4.4GHz. Perfectly suitable for gaming on a very high level. And you can encode videos or stream with them easily when it's not just pure gaming. It's why I always "overshoot" with core count. It never hurts to have extra cylinders for some extra torque...
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#12
randomUser
i would say this IS for gamers too.

Just think about it, 4 threads are for gaming, while the rest is for computational work stuff.

You get to play games while working with no lag :D
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#13
oxidized
I really needed a 32 core CPU for my home PC...
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#14
HTC
randomUser said:
i would say this IS for gamers too.

Just think about it, 4 threads are for gaming, while the rest is for computational work stuff.

You get to play games while working with no lag :D
I'd say 6 cores for gaming and the rest for computational stuff but that is only for the 2950X. Due to only two of the dies having direct memory connection, the 2900WX has quite the penalty with memory intensive workloads.

With the use of something like Process Lasso to make sure the computational assigned cores didn't interfere with the gaming ones, the gaming performance hit shouldn't be high (only the RAM usage would interfere, i think).
Posted on Reply
#15
nickbaldwin86
oxidized said:
I really needed a 32 core CPU for my home PC...
I needed 32 cores for opening every tab in chrome for every page of TPU ;) it would be a few thousand if not million tabs
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#16
StrayKAT
Frick said:
There's nothing unfortunate about it, consumer desktops have no business running this, just as they have no bussiness running anything HEDT.


From the reviews I've seen the 2990WX can hit 4Ghz on all cores ... but it lowers the single core performance slightly, as they boost higher on one core. It pulls like 600W though, and HardOCP reported 1000W at the wall running Prime95.
I'm just a gamer.. so that's in the consumer category to me. I use HEDT simply because I ran out of convenient board options with U.2 support. Plus, they're more future proofed.

The way Intel marketed this thing at first, I don't think they'd agree with you anyway. They also had those Kaby Lake X options at first (now being phased out?). It didn't work out for them, but I think they saw the future proofing aspect as a selling point themselves just for trying that.
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#17
xkm1948
Newegg pre-order of 2990WX got canceled, damn!
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#18
HimymCZe
randomUser said:
i would say this IS for gamers too.

Just think about it, 4 threads are for gaming, while the rest is for computational work stuff.

You get to play games while working with no lag :D
even then you are still better with i5/i7. with new 8000/9000 series you have more then enough "spare" unloaded cores/threads... for less...
It's just DAMN impressive that for ~$1700 you can get the best of both world. $200 gaming and $9999 server CPU in one pack... for A LOT less...
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#19
Blueberries
Buying something like this for gaming would be pointless. Take a look at the bottom of this page. The difference between 6c/12t and 2c/4t in video games is negligible and there are CPUs with higher IPCs that can clock higher on a much lower wattage.

This is for a small demographic of content creators and professionals. Forget your pipe-dreams of this being 53% faster for anything less than an enterprise workload.
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#20
Basard
200Mhz Pentium Pro, 64MB RAM, and 2MB video card cost 3500 bucks... 20 years ago.
Posted on Reply
#21
StrayKAT
Basard said:
200Mhz Pentium Pro, 64MB RAM, and 2MB video card cost 3500 bucks... 20 years ago.
And before that, an IBM PS/2 could run $10k+ lol.

I had a PowerPC 604e that was roughly equivalent to the Penitium Pro at the time and that wasn't cheap either.

We're all winning at this point, no matter what you go with.
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#22
altcapwn
Frick said:
Pretty sure he was ironic.
I wasn't sure, I have an handicap; I don't perceive sarcasm and irony.

My friends always make fun of me with that.
Posted on Reply
#23
phanbuey
Basard said:
200Mhz Pentium Pro, 64MB RAM, and 2MB video card cost 3500 bucks... 20 years ago.
Imagine if you invested that instead... into either AMD, Intel, or Nvidia. :eek:
Posted on Reply
#24
Crustybeaver
altcapwn said:
For gaming, stick with Ryzen.
Nah, Intel is the sensible choice if all you do is game.
Posted on Reply
#25
phill
StrayKAT said:
And before that, an IBM PS/2 could run $10k+ lol.

I had a PowerPC 604e that was roughly equivalent to the Penitium Pro at the time and that wasn't cheap either.

We're all winning at this point, no matter what you go with.
I had a PowerPC 604e+ in my Amiga 1200 many moons ago :) Loved that setup... Sigh....

I find it massively impressive, regardless. The core count, the power consumption. Do we need 32 cores for home PC's? Hell no! But do you want it? Hell yes!! Well, some do :D We are all winners with this/these CPU's for the basic reason I believe that Intel might actually lower it's prices.. I know it's a long shot and they might not, but if they loose money by people buying AMD, then who knows what might happen.

I for one would love this CPU.. Crunching cancer is a good thing but if you think there's 64 work units being done at once (250w just for arguements the power it needs) that's about 4w a thread, that's amazing :) Just for reference, my 5960X system @ 4Ghz @ 1.0vcore is consuming 220w.. that's about 14w a thread... I paid £1000 for this CPU back in 2015... Still no regrets even though I've not used it for 2 years and a bit, until recently.. But at least it's doing something useful now :)

All this CPU power we have access too and I'm pretty sure that even when gaming there will be cores of our CPUs still not being used...
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