Tuesday, August 28th 2018

ADATA Launches XPG SX6000 Pro PCIe Gen3x4 M.2- 2280 SSDs

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash products, today announces the launch of XPG SX6000 Pro PCIe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 SSDs. With NVMe 1.3 technology and 3D NAND Flash, they sport excellent speeds and up to 1TB of capacity, making them a viable alternative to SATA SSDs. In addition, SX6000 Pro SSDs are slimmer than standard M.2 2280 SSDs for a higher level of compatibility thanks to a single-sided design.

ADATA produces the SX6000 Pro in 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB. For PC users looking at tangible performance enhancements, the SX6000 Pro makes complete sense as a SATA successor. The principal advantage of the SX6000 Pro is embodied in its superb cost-performance ratio. Using 3D TLC NAND, NVMe 1.3 technology, and a PCIe Gen3x4 interface, it reaches up to 2100 MB/s read and 1500 MB/s write and random performance of up to 250K/240K IOPS. This means up to four times the speed of typical SATA SSDs.
Single-Sided Design for Easier Installation
Featuring a single-sided design that is 2.15mm thick, SX6000 Pro SSDs are much slimmer than standard M.2 SSDs. This design is ideally suited for notebooks, small-form-factor desktops, and ultrabooks with the latest Intel and AMD platforms.

Designed for Improved Data Integrity and Long-Term Use
The SX6000 Pro features many performance- and longevity-enhancing features shared by all ADATA and XPG SSDs. They include Host Memory Buffer and SLC Caching that ensures better load distribution and sustained peak performance even when handling large tasks such as AAA game titles or rendering video. The SX6000 Pro also supports LDPC (Low-Density Parity-Check) error correcting code technology to detect and fix a wider range of data errors for more reliable data transfers and a longer product lifespan.

Backed by a 5-Year Warranty
Every component on the SX6000 Pro has passed rigorous screening and testing to ensure the utmost quality and reliability. Moreover, SX6000 Pro SSDs are backed by 5-year warranties
Add your own comment

5 Comments on ADATA Launches XPG SX6000 Pro PCIe Gen3x4 M.2- 2280 SSDs

#1
randomUser
Nobody compares NVMe with SATAs these days. Whats the point? Everybody knows that SATA caps ate 560MBps, so why even compare.

It was ok to compare back when NVMe were just showing up. But now, it's a daily thing.
Would be awesome if they compared NVMe to CD-ROM speeds of 1995. Or a floppy disk.

so pointless
Posted on Reply
#4
Prima.Vera
It's funny how already we are capping the PCI-E 3x4 interface with NVMe drives at 3500GB/s. Looks like soon we will see PCI-E 3 x16 drives, but the NVMe M2 standard also needs to be updated since current one only supports x4 speeds.
Posted on Reply
#5
CheapMeat
"randomUser said:
Nobody compares NVMe with SATAs these days. Whats the point? Everybody knows that SATA caps ate 560MBps, so why even compare.

It was ok to compare back when NVMe were just showing up. But now, it's a daily thing.
Would be awesome if they compared NVMe to CD-ROM speeds of 1995. Or a floppy disk.

so pointless
Anyone else notice how our community, well enthusiasts in general, are getting more and more snappy and mean spirited? Always quick to criticize? It doesn't do anything good.


And look, not everyone has an NVMe drive. A SATA drive in the test gives those people CONTEXT. So they can make an informed decision. And YES, I would love to see it compared to CD-ROM speeds from 1995. I think stuff like that is interesting to see. I love having comparisons of progress, even if just for fun.

I'm not entitled to the best of everything. I can appreciate it all.
the NVMe standard also needs to be updated since current one only supports x4 speeds.
I do not believe that is accurate. There are NVMe AIC/HHHL cards that are x8 already. It is not a limit of the standard. It is a controller limit drive wise. Only now are better controllers coming out that are able to handle more bandwidth. The controllers need more channels (cores) and other aspects in able to handle it. Before x8 and x16 AICs/HHHLs were cheating a bit by RAIDing on the card and/or uses PLX switches. Micron and Samsung do have x8 and x16 native controllers. But of course it's more expensive bill of material wise. Enterprise can afford this. But regular consumers wouldn't bother. Hell, there's tons of people who say "SATA is gewd enuff", "YOU'LL NEVER NOTICE THE DIFFERENCE". The x4 BUS limit is not because of the drive but because of the motherboard chipset (PCH) and CPU and how it is handled.
Posted on Reply