Tuesday, August 28th 2018

Crucial DDR4-2933 Registered DIMMs Now Available

Crucial , a leading global brand of memory and storage upgrades, today announced the immediate availability of DDR4 2933 MT/s Registered DIMM server modules, a new offering in its server memory product portfolio. Designed to keep servers running at full speed and peak efficiency in support of Intel's next-generation Xeon processor product families, the new RDIMM modules enable IT users to get the most out of their server infrastructure deployments.

"Our new DDR4 2933 MT/s RDIMMs are designed to deliver the speed required to maximise the memory throughput in the next generation of servers," says Teresa Kelley, VP & GM, Micron Consumer Products Group. "Today's data centres are running memory intensive applications that require a higher degree of overall system performance, and our new RDIMM modules were designed to meet this next level of system performance."
Crucial 2933 MT/s RDIMMs are designed for leading server platforms, compatible with OEM systems and warranties, and backed by a limited lifetime warranty. With module densities up to 32GB and speeds up to 2933 MT/s, Crucial DDR4 RDIMMs are available for purchase through select global partners. All Crucial memory is backed by a limited lifetime warranty.

Product Highlights:
  • Increased server performance
  • Module speed of 2933 MT/s
  • Available in densities up to 32GB
  • Optimised for the latest Intel Xeon processor product families
  • Compatible with OEM servers and OEM warranties
  • 100% component and module tested to mission-critical server standards
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9 Comments on Crucial DDR4-2933 Registered DIMMs Now Available

#1
herliTz1337
No RGB lights? How should I see if it is working? So not 21 century!
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#2
Disparia
Oh yeah, hitting that OC with 2933 will be a cinch compared to 2666 ;)




It's actually been a long time since I've had the pleasure of receiving gobs of server RAM and a carton of hard drives to fill out SuperMicro kits. A smaller company of a different era, that green Crucial gets me nostalgic.
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#3
bonehead123
server grade = boo-koo $$$ yes ?

And whats the big deal with 2933, I've been running @3200 for almost 18 months now...............
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#4
Disparia
bonehead123
server grade = boo-koo $$$ yes ?

And whats the big deal with 2933, I've been running @3200 for almost 18 months now...............
The starting point is about $1600 USD. Twelve sticks x 8GB is the minimal amount you'll find with a pair of Xeons:



They also have 16GB and 32GB sticks, which vastly increase capacity -- while running at relatively high speeds and low voltages.

If you wanted to upgrade to 32GB on your Z170 board, you might be able to stay at 3200 with certain sticks.

In both cases we need high quality memory for our purposes, and it costs us both in that way.
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#5
Octopuss
Registered is another word for ECC or...?
Posted on Reply
#6
bonehead123
Disparia
If you wanted to upgrade to 32GB on your Z170 board, you might be able to stay at 3200 with certain sticks.
oops, I already have 32gb, just forgot to uodate my a system specs....
Posted on Reply
#7
efikkan
herliTz1337
No RGB lights? How should I see if it is working? So not 21 century!
Every respectable server needs RGB lighting!

Octopuss
Registered is another word for ECC or...?
No, it's buffered memory, often used on larger modules. Most of these also support ECC.
Posted on Reply
#8
Octopuss
Omg, so is it buffered or registered? And what is ECC then?
Posted on Reply
#9
RedTangent
Octopuss
Omg, so is it buffered or registered? And what is ECC then?
Registered RAM (also reffered to as Buffered RAM) means that there's management components on the RAM sticks themselves, which offloads pressure/power on the CPU's integrated memory management. This is necessary when you start dealing with massive amounts of memory found in servers/workstations. You will be hard pressed to find registered RAM outside of workstations/servers though, as the extra components and complexity makes them much more expensive. It also tends to limit the maximum speed of the RAM due to having more complex sticks.

ECC is Error Correcting Code. RAM with ECC capabilities have an extra memory chip per rank that is used as a parity bit to ensure that memory doesn't become corrupt. Similar to RAID 5 on a very basic level.
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