Tuesday, September 18th 2018

ASUS Launches its ROG Ryujin Line of AIO Liquid CPU Coolers for AMD TR4

ASUS today launched the Republic of Gamers (ROG) Ryujin line of all-in-one liquid CPU coolers for AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors. Positioned above the ROG Ryuo series, which opened to pre-orders earlier this month, the Ryujin was first showcased at the 2018 Computex. These coolers are characterized by a somewhat square pump-block design that resembles a that of a chipset heatsink; but is embedded with a 1.77-inch color OLED display that shows an animated ROG logo by default, but can be reprogrammed to show just about anything, such as clan logos, live CPU temperature/load monitoring, etc. Another innovation that sets the Ryujin pump-block apart from every other Asetek cooler out there, is a tiny lateral-blower fan embedded into the block, which ASUS claims can bring down CPU VRM and M.2 SSD temperatures by up to 20°C.

The Ryujin series comes in two variants based on radiator size, the Ryujin 240 (120 mm x 240 mm radiator), and Ryujin 360 (120 mm x 360 mm radiator). These are 27 mm-thick aluminium radiators, which are ventilated by matte-black Noctua IndustrialPPC 120 mm PWM fans that are part of the package. These fans each spin between 450 to 2,000 RPM, pushing up to 121.8 CFM of air, with noise output up to 31 dBA. As we mentioned earlier, the product pages for both models mentions that the coolers only support AMD socket TR4, with full coverage for the AMD Ryzen Threadripper integrated heatspreader. This could help ASUS command a slightly high price, given that it's catering only to the market that can afford HEDT processors.
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28 Comments on ASUS Launches its ROG Ryujin Line of AIO Liquid CPU Coolers for AMD TR4

#1
R0H1T
This reminds me of Ryūjin Jakka :cool:
Posted on Reply
#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Updated images.
Posted on Reply
#5
bonehead123
nice looking pump, but, but

need..
moar....
R.G.B......
eVeRyWhErE.........

nOt :D
Posted on Reply
#6
IceShroom
Is it fully cover TR4 IHS or is it like those Asetek one?
Posted on Reply
#7
Caring1
IceShroom said:
Is it fully cover TR4 IHS or is it like those Asetek one?
Good question, the write up says full cover, but the round Asetek mounting ring shown, indicates it isn't.
Posted on Reply
#8
aktpu
My guess is that pictures are from "normal" Ryujin, not TR4-version. Based on looking at screws and "backplate" in the picture
Posted on Reply
#9
diatribe
Adding the Noctua Industrial fans is a very good move on the part of Asus. Although I think the Chromax series would probably work just as well.
Posted on Reply
#10
jmcslob
I really have never liked that "whale" or whatever it is icon thing in the ROG stuff.
I think it looks tacky AF.
Posted on Reply
#11
B1scu1T
jmcslob said:
I really have never liked that "whale" or whatever it is icon thing in the ROG stuff.
I think it looks tacky AF.
I always thought it was an angry eye
Posted on Reply
#12
bonehead123
B1scu1T said:
I always thought it was an angry eye
It is just that, and it IS watching everything you do every minute of every day....
Posted on Reply
#13
Upgrayedd
I'll never understand this AIO craze. A GPU will run 15C hotter but we still insist on doing this to the cpu for some dumb reason.
Posted on Reply
#14
DarVarOne
bonehead123 said:
It is just that, and it IS watching everything you do every minute of every day....
:) Agree, The BigBrother is watching, but in fact:

The ROG Logo
The first version of the ROG logo was a cubed letter G, denoting the great depth and many facets of gaming. This morphed into the mask logo, as part of a major brand overhaul in 2008. It now includes the new red cloak motif, which debuted together with the Rampage II Extreme motherboard.
https://rog.asus.com/about-rog/
Posted on Reply
#15
Caring1
B1scu1T said:
I always thought it was an angry eye
Could be a sea gull on fire
Posted on Reply
#16
hat
Enthusiast
Upgrayedd said:
I'll never understand this AIO craze. A GPU will run 15C hotter but we still insist on doing this to the cpu for some dumb reason.
I would always install an AIO so that the fan is exhaust... against manufacturer instructions, yeah, but I would rather my CPU run 3c warmer than dump a bunch of hot air in my case because the incoming air first comes through a hot radiator...
Posted on Reply
#17
angryphoton
I have looked at Asus' Global Website and I cannot see this product anywhere. Is this product really coming out? The only Ryujin AIO's in Asus website are not AMD only AIO but AIO's that for both Intel and AMD, thus not a full coverage TR4 plate. Also I cannot find anywhere on the internet about this AMD exclusive AIO from Asus anywhere.
Posted on Reply
#18
Tatty_One
Super Squirrel Moderator
angryphoton said:
I have looked at Asus' Global Website and I cannot see this product anywhere. Is this product really coming out? The only Ryujin AIO's in Asus website are not AMD only AIO but AIO's that for both Intel and AMD, thus not a full coverage TR4 plate. Also I cannot find anywhere on the internet about this AMD exclusive AIO from Asus anywhere.
I think there is maybe a separate package specifically for TR4 otherwise yes at first glance it would appear you would have been right, so I am guessing they have multiple socket CPU solutions for both the 240 and 360 and then a standalone TR4 solution with a full coverage plate, I am only deducting this because of the notes section at the bottom of this page...……………...

https://www.asus.com/uk/Cooling/ROG-RYUJIN-360/specifications/
Posted on Reply
#19
EarthDog
Interesting...who makes this?

Upgrayedd said:
I'll never understand this AIO craze. A GPU will run 15C hotter but we still insist on doing this to the cpu for some dumb reason.
Que?

hat said:
I would always install an AIO so that the fan is exhaust... against manufacturer instructions, yeah, but I would rather my CPU run 3c warmer than dump a bunch of hot air in my case because the incoming air first comes through a hot radiator...
Depends on the system AMD what you are doing with it. In most situations it doesnt really matter.
Posted on Reply
#20
Upgrayedd
EarthDog said:
Que?
A CPU will run 15C cooler on air than a GPU on air. Why would I AIO my CPU instead of GPU if a GPU is the main heat producer? Its a fad to me and people gobble it up just like a fad.
Posted on Reply
#21
EarthDog
I dont understand your point though. To what end? You talking about heat dump in a case? Sure... but mitigated with fans. CPUs get fresh air from intake fans or fresh from a radiator if used as an intake. It really doesnt matter as much as you think (fad...lol).
Posted on Reply
#22
jmcslob
Right...
I'm blowing 2x140mm fans through my 280mm radiator directly into my case Which does increase my temps but it's <1c.
I have 3x120mm exhaust fans plus the PSU.
In the end it really doesn't effect anything other than looks and it looks quiet nice with Ring/Halo fans..just sayin.
Posted on Reply
#23
hat
Enthusiast
Upgrayedd said:
A CPU will run 15C cooler on air than a GPU on air. Why would I AIO my CPU instead of GPU if a GPU is the main heat producer? Its a fad to me and people gobble it up just like a fad.
It would be much harder to produce AIOs for GPUs. The mounting holes change every time someone at nVidia or RTG farts.

I got an h70 years and years ago, and have used it on a 1366 system, 775 system, and two 1155 systems. And 1155 isn't even an option on my bracket. 1156 is. It works because the mounting holes, at least, have not changed since Socket 1156 (I'm assuming the 1366 holes are probably compatible with even the latest 2066 systems, as well).

Aside from that, you have varying layouts of board circuitry that also needs cooling. You can't cool just the GPU die, there are memory chips and VRMs and such that need to be accounted for. These layouts, too, will change, so you can't just design an AIO that will work well for years across generations.

You also can't (usually) just set your card to whatever you want and see if it works or not. My 2600k is fully unlocked. If I want to, I can go try to boot at 5GHz right now... can't do the same with graphics cards anymore. GPU Boost has removed that capability in return for "automatic overclocking", which, in reality, is a set of protections instilled in the card. You are constrained by power, temp, voltage and probably other limits, and you're given a lowball base/boost clock spec, and then told by nVidia: "hey, we're overclocking your card for you, it'll probably (not guaranteed) be fast). The way I see it, it's a set of limitations covered by a smokescreen of "automatic overclocking" up to what the clocks ought to be in the first place. They don't even have to guarantee a real high clock speed this way; they can just give you, as I said before, a lowball spec and laugh as you are amazed by sysinfo reporting utilities showing your actual speed way past that.

Phew, that last bit turned into a bit of a rant... I must be more cynical than usual today. Anyway, the point was that graphics cards aren't as controllable as (at least some) processors are, so there's little point in monster cooling when you can't go past the limits of GPU Boost anyway.
Posted on Reply
#24
Upgrayedd
hat said:
It would be much harder to produce AIOs for GPUs. The mounting holes change every time someone at nVidia or RTG farts.

I got an h70 years and years ago, and have used it on a 1366 system, 775 system, and two 1155 systems. And 1155 isn't even an option on my bracket. 1156 is. It works because the mounting holes, at least, have not changed since Socket 1156 (I'm assuming the 1366 holes are probably compatible with even the latest 2066 systems, as well).

Aside from that, you have varying layouts of board circuitry that also needs cooling. You can't cool just the GPU die, there are memory chips and VRMs and such that need to be accounted for. These layouts, too, will change, so you can't just design an AIO that will work well for years across generations.

You also can't (usually) just set your card to whatever you want and see if it works or not. My 2600k is fully unlocked. If I want to, I can go try to boot at 5GHz right now... can't do the same with graphics cards anymore. GPU Boost has removed that capability in return for "automatic overclocking", which, in reality, is a set of protections instilled in the card. You are constrained by power, temp, voltage and probably other limits, and you're given a lowball base/boost clock spec, and then told by nVidia: "hey, we're overclocking your card for you, it'll probably (not guaranteed) be fast). The way I see it, it's a set of limitations covered by a smokescreen of "automatic overclocking" up to what the clocks ought to be in the first place. They don't even have to guarantee a real high clock speed this way; they can just give you, as I said before, a lowball spec and laugh as you are amazed by sysinfo reporting utilities showing your actual speed way past that.

Phew, that last bit turned into a bit of a rant... I must be more cynical than usual today. Anyway, the point was that graphics cards aren't as controllable as (at least some) processors are, so there's little point in monster cooling when you can't go past the limits of GPU Boost anyway.
Yeah where did the talk of GPU boost come from? Yes I realize the mounting situation. AIOs are still faddy for their cost and what they do and they completely ignore any VRMs. "CPU is at 55C but GPU is at 70C... lets AIO the CPU!" zero sense..
Posted on Reply
#25
EarthDog
Upgrayedd said:
Yeah where did the talk of GPU boost come from? Yes I realize the mounting situation. AIOs are still faddy for their cost and what they do and they completely ignore any VRMs. "CPU is at 55C but GPU is at 70C... lets AIO the CPU!" zero sense..
You keep saying that... but.. for no reason, really.
Posted on Reply
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