Monday, November 5th 2018

SK Hynix Launches World's First 'CTF-based 4D NAND Flash' (96-Layer 512Gb TLC)

SK Hynix today launched the world's first 96-Layer 512Gb CTF (Charge Trap Flash) based 4D NAND flash. Don't let the name trick you - it's still based on 3D TLC technology, but SK Hynix has gone and added a 4th dimension due to its pairing of charge trap flash technology in conjunction with PUC (Peri. Under Cell technology.

SK Hynix says that their approach is (obviously) better than the industry-wide 3D Floating Gate approach. The 4D NAND chip design results in a reduction of more than 30% in chip size, and increases bit productivity per wafer by 49% compared to the Company's 72-Layer 512Gb 3D NAND. Moreover, the product has 30% higher write and 25% higher read performance. Also, its data bandwidth is doubled to an industry-leading (in size) 64KB. Data I/O (Input Output) speed reaches 1,200Mbps (Megabits/sec) at 1.2 V.
The plan in to introduce consumer products with up to 1 TB capacity alongside SK Hynix's controllers and firmware; enterprise SSDs will follow in the first half of 2019, but Sk Hynix is still introducing 96-layer 1 Tb TLC and QLC memory chips in 2019.

"This 96-Layer CTF-based 4D NAND, with the industry's top cost competitiveness and performance, will become a milestone in the Company's NAND Flash business, as a platform in developing future products," said vice president J.T. Kim, the Head of NAND Marketing. "The Company plans to start the early stage mass production of it within this year and further expand the production in M15 to actively respond to a variety of clients," he added. Source: SK Hynix
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11 Comments on SK Hynix Launches World's First 'CTF-based 4D NAND Flash' (96-Layer 512Gb TLC)

#1
lynx29
Can this tech transfer to NVME or no? If so, maybe Hynix will outperform even a 970 Pro on speeds and fully saturate m.2 limits.
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#2
R0H1T
Sure, NVMe has nothing to do with the type of NAND in question, 4D or 12D :pimp:
Posted on Reply
#3
Wavetrex
Quite amazing how this tech advances.
Maybe the dream of ditching mechanical harddisks will actually become true with this new tech.

Can't come soon enough. If there's anything that I "fear" most in IT is that my data will suddenly and unexpectedly become "poof" when a HDD ceases to spin properly.
(Yes, I know, backups, RAID, etc. etc., but in the end, it's better to not have those worries by using new reliable tech that is not as fragile and risky as a HDD)
Posted on Reply
#4
lynx29
"R0H1T said:
Sure, NVMe has nothing to do with the type of NAND in question, 4D or 12D:pimp:
from what i understand, the 970 pro already comes within like 93% of saturating the bandwidth limit on m.2 NVMe

so even if this does come to fruition and is affordable, your only looking at 7% or so gains max...no matter what, just because of the limitation of the m.2 design. kinda sucks. we need a m.3 design when ddr5 ram comes out in 2020 or 2021 alongside pci-e 4.0 slots
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#5
R0H1T
"lynx29 said:
from what i understand, the 970 pro already comes within like 93% of saturating the bandwidth limit on m.2 NVMe

so even if this does come to fruition and is affordable, your only looking at 7% or so gains max...no matter what, just because of the limitation of the m.2 design. kinda sucks. we need a m.3 design when ddr5 ram comes out in 2020 or 2021 alongside pci-e 4.0 slots
Not really, 970 pro is limited by PCIe 3.0 & the controller, IIRC there are PCIe 4.0 based controllers which will be launched sometime in 2019. The limit you're talking about is chipset & CPU limitation, it ain't a NAND or NVMe limit, in fact there's already better albeit more expensive solutions out there ~ https://www.anandtech.com/show/13155/microsemi-announces-pcie-40-switches-and-nvme-ssd-controller
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#6
Kamgusta
"lynx29 said:
Can this tech transfer to NVME or no? If so, maybe Hynix will outperform even a 970 Pro on speeds and fully saturate m.2 limits.
They just stacked a NAND over another NAND and then another NAND on top of them. Repeat. 4D is a marketing term, chips are "3D" just like the others.
This "tech" is just a 512Gbit (=64GB) NAND chip.
That means we'll see 100$ 1TB SSD in 2019.
End of story, man.
Posted on Reply
#7
lynx29
"Kamgusta said:
They just stacked a NAND over another NAND and then another NAND on top of them. Repeat. 4D is a marketing term, chips are "3D" just like the others.
This "tech" is just a 512Gbit (=64GB) NAND chip.
That means we'll see 100$ 1TB SSD in 2019.
End of story, man.
well I bought my Micron 1100 2TB SSD for $230 free ship no tax on a lightning sale about 6 months ago, so I wouldn't exactly call it an amazing deal or anything.
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#8
Prima.Vera
"lynx29 said:
well I bought my Micron 1100 2TB SSD for $230 free ship no tax on a lightning sale about 6 months ago, so I wouldn't exactly call it an amazing deal or anything.
US it's not the World. In the rest of the world especially Europe and Australia, prices are at least 50-60% more due to callous numerous taxes and all.
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#9
moproblems99
"Prima.Vera said:
US it's not the World. In the rest of the world especially Europe and Australia, prices are at least 50-60% more due to callous numerous taxes and all.
Off topic I know, but don't those wonderful taxes mean great things - such as free college and health care?

On topic: Is it just me or are SSD/NAND announcements just not exciting anymore?
Posted on Reply
#10
Mayclore
So, pointless for the SATA III interface, but NVMe? Oh lord.
Posted on Reply
#11
XiGMAKiD
What about durability, is it better or the same as competing tech?

Also I hope they don't shy away from consumer product like Intel does with their 3D XPoint SSD
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