Thursday, January 24th 2019

Transcend Launches MTE220S M.2 NVMe SSD Series

Transcend Information Inc., a leading manufacturer of storage and multimedia products, is proud to announce the MTE220S PCIe M.2 Solid-State Drive. This SSD utilizes PCI Express Gen3 x4 interface and is compatible with NVM Express (NVMe) specifications. Utilizing this interface means never-before-seen transfer speeds of 3,500 MB/s read and 2,800 MB/s write are now a reality. Using 3D chips and packing into a M.2 2280 form factor, the MTE220S SSD is the must-have for gaming enthusiasts and high-end applications.

Transcend's MTE220S SSD comes equipped with DDR3 DRAM cache memory. This means that commonly used programs load much faster, and boot time is greatly reduced. Utilizing SLC caching, the MTE220S SSD can reach astonishing read/write speeds of 3,500 MB/s and 2,800 MB/s, respectively, and 4K Random performance is also significantly improved. In addition to speeds, reliability is also enhanced with the Low Density Parity Check code in place.
NVMe interface allows unmatched transfer speeds
Transcend's MTE220S SSD, utilizing the PCIe Gen3 x4 interface and compatible with the latest NVMe 1.3 bus specifications, can reach transfer speeds of up to 32 GB/s, crushing the SATAIII limit of 6 GB/s. The 3D NAND flash chips used in the SSD mean a bottleneck breakthrough that results in vastly improved read and write speeds over 2D planar NAND. Low power consumption and excellent reliability are also hallmarks of this construction, ensuring long-term dependability. This, then, is an excellent choice for gamers and those who require fast read/write cycles and unquestionable reliability.

SSD Scope Software
The proprietary SSD Scope software, a free download from the Transcend website, is a tailor-made kit that measures the SSD's health. Tools include View Drive Information, View S.M.A.R.T. Status, Diagnostic Scan, Secure Erase, Firmware Update, TRIM Enable, Health Indicator, and System Clone.

Warranty
Transcend's MTE220S PCIe M.2 SSD comes in 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB capacities, and are covered by Transcend's five-year limited warranty.
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16 Comments on Transcend Launches MTE220S M.2 NVMe SSD Series

#1
Wavetrex
Another day, another NVMe drive.

SATA's days are numbered.
Posted on Reply
#2
londiste
Utilizing SLC caching, the MTE220S SSD can reach astonishing read/write speeds of 3,500 MB/s and 2,800 MB/s, respectively, and 4K Random performance is also significantly improved.
I love the marketingspeak. Sequential read/write is astonishing but 4K Random that is much more important in real usage is "significantly improved" :D
Posted on Reply
#3
sepheronx
Wavetrex
Another day, another NVMe drive.

SATA's days are numbered.
Why? What if you need more than one hard drive?
Posted on Reply
#4
Wavetrex
sepheronx
Why? What if you need more than one hard drive?
Well I meant SATA SSD days. (but it was very late night and tired)
Many motherboards today (and all HEDT ones) have more than one M.2 slot.

SATA ports will soon fall back to HDD's only.

(And I expect even those will reduce in numbers, as PCI-e 4.0 will allow good speeds with M.2 cards with just 2 lanes, meaning expansion cards that go into a 16x PCI-e slot and support 8 (eight!!!) M.2 NVME cards will become a thing.

I am aware people kept saying "HDD's are dead" for a long time, but I really expect that before 2025, they will be. SSD's will have won in all three categories - capacity, price and of course, performance.
Posted on Reply
#5
nemesis.ie
sepheronx
Why? What if you need more than one hard drive?
Lots of boards are coming with more than one M.2 slot now. ;)

We should see them with more than one full-speed one on mainstreanm boards this year too I think (and even the gimped ones are faster than SATA).

TR of course has 3+ full speed but is in another class (HEDT).
Posted on Reply
#6
Landcross
Wavetrex
Well I meant SATA SSD days. (but it was very late night and tired)
I am aware people kept saying "HDD's are dead" for a long time, but I really expect that before 2025, they will be. SSD's will have won in all three categories - capacity, price and of course, performance.
For most users that might be true, but for big data storage (businesses, enthusiasts, prosumers etc.) I personally don't think ssds will be cheaper $/TB than hdds before 2025. I do hope so though, I hope so...
Posted on Reply
#7
sepheronx
nemesis.ie
Lots of boards are coming with more than one M.2 slot now. ;)

We should see them with more than one full-speed one on mainstreanm boards this year too I think (and even the gimped ones are faster than SATA).

TR of course has 3+ full speed but is in another class (HEDT).
I use itx motherboards. So at best one could fit. I highly doubt they could fit 2. I think SATA will be around for lot longer than people think.
Posted on Reply
#8
trparky
sepheronx
I use itx motherboards.
But there's expansion cards that can turn a regular PCIeX16 slot into two (or more) M.2 slots for SSDs. The only bad part is that you'd have to give up on using a dedicated GPU in that case.
Posted on Reply
#9
bajs11
the MTE220S SSD is the must-have for gaming enthusiasts
yeah... not really because the difference in loading time is usually a few seconds or less compared to sata ssds for most games
and NVMe or any ssd don't give more fps
Posted on Reply
#10
nemesis.ie
@spheronx The one ITX machine I build had the M.2 on the back of the board, if traces allow, it could likely fit 2 or 3 back there.

If you have an APU, you have a PCIe slot for more or indeed if there are any boards with more than 1 slot, someone could do an LP card with room for at least 2.

In larger form-factors there's room for lots more. Maybe even a vertical slot could be used (and a metal case on the M.2 module) so you could pop the shorter ones in instead of where SATA ports currently reside or similar. I think this is more of a "thinking about it" problem than an engineering one. I.e. if someone decides to do it, it could be done fairly easily. With more b/w per lane it becomes even easier, put e.g. a PCIe 4.0 x4 and split it out to two M.2 connectors. Keeps the traces that go the distance 1/2 the size (or the same size but you get two ports).

I'm sure it will come, eventually.
Posted on Reply
#11
cucker tarlson
Wavetrex
Well I meant SATA SSD days. (but it was very late night and tired)
Many motherboards today (and all HEDT ones) have more than one M.2 slot.
it's hard to fit 3 m.2 drives on the mobo,while 8x sata ports fit easily. then there's a question of price.even the entry level nvme drive will cost more than a good sata ssd while it will offer roughly the same performance at lower TBW. If you compare a good nvme vs a good sata ssd the performance difference will be there but the cost almost doubles. Sorry,but nvme drives at this point are pointless unless you want bleeding edge performance regardless of the cost.
Posted on Reply
#12
Wavetrex
cucker tarlson
it's hard to fit 3 m.2 drives on the mobo
Imagine if DDR-DRAM were laid flat on the motherboard, how much space they would take. (Example - Laptops)

But no, they stand on their side and use the three-dimensional space to fit a whole bunch of them (8, 12 or 16 even on server boards).

I can already see a design on some engineer's desk which has 4x NVME slots on the side of a TR4 mobo, taking very little space. They are only restricted by thermals, but that can be solved too with proper design.
The M.2 format is the near-future of storage, for sure !
2.5" was just a stop-gap measure for compatibility with all the existing ecosystem of computers.
Posted on Reply
#13
cucker tarlson
Wavetrex
Imagine if DDR-DRAM were laid flat on the motherboard, how much space they would take. (Example - Laptops)

But no, they stand on their side and use the three-dimensional space to fit a whole bunch of them (8, 12 or 16 even on server boards).

I can already see a design on some engineer's desk which has 4x NVME slots on the side of a TR4 mobo, taking very little space. They are only restricted by thermals, but that can be solved too with proper design.
The M.2 format is the near-future of storage, for sure !
2.5" was just a stop-gap measure for compatibility with all the existing ecosystem of computers.
the easy way would be to fit every mobo with a 4x m.2 pci-e card.

Posted on Reply
#15
cucker tarlson
In PL they're one of the cheapest ssd brands. Ridiculously low prices,but I've never seen a review of one.
Posted on Reply
#16
Wavetrex
cucker tarlson
the easy way would be to fit every mobo with a 4x m.2 pci-e card.
That thing is just lovely !

Definitely something to consider for a future Threadripper-based build !
With the new lower prices of SSD's... such a setup doesn't cost a kidney and a half anymore. 4x 512GB M.2 SSDs for insanely fast I/O that would feel like a RAM-drive.
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