Monday, February 11th 2019

SuperMicro Gearing for Launch of New Gaming-Grade Motherboards With PCIe Gen4 and DDR5 Wave

SuperMicro may not be household name in consumer motherboards right now, but they once were a decent alternative in the market - or so I've been told by people much more knowledgeable than me in that regard, as I never laid my hands on one. The company is now more known for its server products, where it has focused most of its attention in the past decade - an effort that gave it a good, third-place hold in that market. And if the company can command such a market share in a much more requirements-heavy environment such as the server market demands, then it's likely those design decisions and developments will find themselves trickling down to the consumer side in any sort of consumer, gaming-grade product the company decided to tackle.

To that end, SuperMicro is gearing up to re introduce themselves to the consumer market, accompanying the wave of new technologies coming to the market in a few years - namely, PCIe Gen 4 and DDR5 memory. The company seems to think that this will mark a perfect opportunity for a strong comeback to the consumer market - where they now only offer a handful of motherboard solutions for Intel's CPUs. One such example is the C9Z390-PGW motherboard, based on Intel's Z390 chipset - with its 10-phase VRM design, PLC chip for doubling of PCIe lanes, and 10 Gigabit Lan. But not only on said "typical" consumer motherboard techonologies will SuperMicro be delivering - if the company has its way, anything from 5G, IoT, Mission Learning and Artificial Intelligence can be incorporated for some use case or another on consumer-grade motherboards, thus providing an axis of penetration for SuperMicro - and its entire partner eco-system.
The company is looking to leverage its IoT and server expertise that it has been cultivating in the last few years - with gaming grade products that will go up against the likes of ASUS Maximus and Gigabyte Aorus. Senior VP Vik Malyala told KitGuru that their company is also monitoring Ryzen's performance in the market, and reflected upon SuperMicro being one of the first companies to release Epyc-supporting motherboards. Perhaps we'll see the return of green to motherboards with a sexy tinge of environmentally-friendly operations. Sources: KitGuru, via TechSpot
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31 Comments on SuperMicro Gearing for Launch of New Gaming-Grade Motherboards With PCIe Gen4 and DDR5 Wave

#1
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
No Spying right?

Hopefully they get a competent bios team
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#2
cellar door
Brings back memories of my green DFI Lanparty
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#3
Chloe Price
Stupid placement for +12V on the mATX board. Reminds me of the old S462/P4 motherboards when the PSU was on top of the case, and the cable could be routed easily.
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#4
Vycyous
The more competition, the better. I think they'll definitely need to work on their aesthetics a bit more.

eidairaman1 said:
No Spying right?
I'm sure you're joking, but hasn't that been debunked by, well... pretty much everyone?
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#5
PooPipeBoy
Vycyous said:
The more competition, the better. I think they'll definitely need to work on their aesthetics a bit more.
I quite like a minimalist approach to aesthetics. Get rid of the dick-waving stuff completely. Nobody can complain that the RGB lighting is bad when it's not even an included feature.
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#6
kastriot
I hope no spying this time ;).
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#7
Vycyous
PooPipeBoy said:
I quite like a minimalist approach to aesthetics. Get rid of the dick-waving stuff completely. Nobody can complain that the RGB lighting is bad when it's not even an included feature.
For the most part, I agree. I should've specified that I was referring to the colors. Personally, I prefer a more neutral color scheme consisting of just gray and/or black. I'm not a fan of all the RGB and "gamer" stuff. Of course, I usually focus on the quality and/or performance (or value) of PC hardware; appearances are typically the lowest priority.
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#8
Chloe Price
Personally I like that red/black "old ROG" style on that mATX board.
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#9
Nucleoprotein
Vycyous said:

I'm sure you're joking, but hasn't that been debunked by, well... pretty much everyone?
But fake news has done his work...
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#10
ArbitraryAffection
Chloe Price said:
Stupid placement for +12V on the mATX board. Reminds me of the old S462/P4 motherboards when the PSU was on top of the case, and the cable could be routed easily.
The 8 pin? Isn't that like where it always is on motherboards? IDK what the 4 pin is for though.
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#11
AsRock
TPU addict
Look pretty meh,not seeing any reason(s) to pick any of these over others, even the naming sucks, not very consumer friendly.
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#12
Xzibit
eidairaman1 said:
No Spying right?
No worries. They will conduct an audit 3 years later and tell you everything is fine.
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#13
Chloe Price
ArbitraryAffection said:
The 8 pin? Isn't that like where it always is on motherboards? IDK what the 4 pin is for though.
Ah, the 4pin just caught my eye, didn't even see that 8pin. But the 4pin's placement is stupid.

Probably just for more juice, just like my X470 board has 8pin + 4pin.
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#14
Assimilator
"PLC chip"? I think you meant PLX.

Not sure how Supermicro are looking to regain their marketshare with technologies that aren't commercially available... Hynix only announced their first working DDR5 module in November last year, and I very much doubt that Zen 2 will support it, so I'm not expecting to see DDR5 become widespread until at least 2020.
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#16
sepheronx
Question:

How can DDR5 work currently? Isn't the memory controller on the CPU? So wouldn't there be issues trying to run CPU's that obviously do not have such memory controller on a board using DDR5? And which DDR5 modules exist?
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#17
ebivan
I would really like to see some "no bullshit" (eg NO RGB, NO colored heatsinks, no onboard SOUND) mainboard. Server quality for customerprice. Green pcb, rock solid build, good vrms, no bullshit software included. Nothing else. I think that is the only thing missing in retail hardware these days...
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#19
Assimilator
sepheronx said:
Question:

How can DDR5 work currently? Isn't the memory controller on the CPU? So wouldn't there be issues trying to run CPU's that obviously do not have such memory controller on a board using DDR5? And which DDR5 modules exist?
DDR4 test modules first appeared in 2011, but only hit the market in 2013, and only started to become price-competitive with older DDR3 in 2014. I expect the ramp-up to DDR5 will be faster, but as I already noted, Hynix only produced a test module at the end of last year, and none of the other memory players have made any DDR5 announcements.

Today's CPUs are required to support DDR5 since they have their memory controllers integrated (back in the LGA775 days the memory controller was on the motherboard, which allowed motherboards to support new memory that the CPUs didn't, or even support multiple types of memory). Now, it's possible that AMD and Intel could respin their CPU designs to add DDR5 support, but they don't like supporting multiple memory types because that takes up extra space on the die, where space is already at a premium.

Zen 2 is supposed to be launching in the middle of the year, and it's conceivable that part could support DDR5, but AMD has made it clear that the AM4 socket is supposed to be around through 2020, and historically AMD has always changed sockets for a new memory type, which strongly suggests no DDR5 support. From Intel's side it's anyone's guess as their roadmap is a mess right now with 10nm their priority above everything else, so I'd say it's unlikely that they'll offer DDR5 support this year either.

Based on all of the above, I think we'll be lucky to see DDR5 memory (and support for it in other products) available to consumers before the end of this year, and I definitely don't see DDR5 taking the lion's share of the market before 2021.

XXL_AI said:
they hacked pentagon now homes uh? https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-10-04/the-big-hack-how-china-used-a-tiny-chip-to-infiltrate-america-s-top-companies
nope.
That story has been debunked far and wide.
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#20
R0H1T
Pretty sure DDR5 will be in servers first while PCIe 4.0 isn't really needed except for high end storage &/or networking, since multi-GPU has all but died.
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#21
DeathtoGnomes
...company is also monitoring Ryzen's performance in the market, and reflected upon SuperMicro being one of the first companies to release Epyc-supporting motherboards.
my first thought here was about having an Epyc in a home pc environment. :cool:
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#22
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Those VRM heatsinks remind me of cheap low end Gigabyte boards
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#23
Diverge
I'd love to have a motherboard made for enthusiasts, that has a BMC controller. Hopefully that is a feature from their server boards that they will bring to their consumer boards.
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#24
er557
my workstation board has bmc, but aside from potential security risks, I failed to see it benefit much a home server, maybe you can enlighten me
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#25
Diverge
er557 said:
my workstation board has bmc, but aside from potential security risks, I failed to see it benefit much a home server, maybe you can enlighten me
I just like the ability to remote access to bios, and power controls. It's not something I'd use often, but nice to have if ever needed. I've used it alot in the past w/ my esxi server, but when things are up and running w/o issues, I can't say it is used much. But still awesome to have, IMO.
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