Wednesday, April 17th 2019

AMD Announces the Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC Series

At the Taiwan Embedded Forum, AMD announced the Ryzen embedded product family is growing with the new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC. Building upon the success of the Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC, the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC provides embedded customers with dual core, quad-threaded performance, as well as the ability to run fanless, low power solutions for 4K displays; while providing leading-edge security features. The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 is perfect for applications in digital displays, high-performance edge computing, networking, thin clients and more.

Customers like Advantech, ASRock Industrial, IBASE, Netronome, Quixant and others are already working on Ryzen Embedded R1000-based products. As well, Atari© is using the high-performance Vega 3 graphics and 'Zen' CPU architecture in the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC to power the upcoming Atari VCS game system.
"The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 builds out the Ryzen Embedded family and provides a compelling option for customers that want access to the powerful 'Zen' and 'Vega' architecture and are looking for a highly competitive power/performance solution," said Stephen Turnbull, director of product management and business development, Embedded Solutions, AMD. "The Ryzen Embedded R1000 can support rich multimedia environments for digital displays and casino gaming, enterprise class security features for edge computing, networking and thin clients, and, most importantly introduces a new class of performance while providing customers with software and hardware compatibility with the extended Ryzen Embedded family."

Growing the Ryzen Embedded Family
The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 continues to provide the embedded industry with the high-performance, rich multimedia capabilities and advanced security features established with the Ryzen Embedded V1000.

Specifically, as the embedded industry demands more immersive and engaging visual experiences, customers need processors that can support high-resolution displays with demanding graphics. The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 supports up to three 4K displays at up to 60 FPS, while providing H.265 Encode/Decode(10b) and VP9 decode3 capabilities. This enables OEMs and ODMs to deliver a compelling visual experience.

As well, the Ryzen Embedded R1000 utilizes the same leading-edge security features of the AMD embedded family, including Secure Root of Trust and Secure Run Technology, giving customers the features for enabling secure solutions, whether they are connected into an edge computing network, or running a digital display.

New Customers Driving Early Adoption
As an industry leader in customer facing marketing technology including digital signage, STRATACACHE picked the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 and Ryzen Embedded V1000 processors to power new multi-output digital signage players serving the STRATACACHE, Scala, X2O Media and Real Digital Media product families. The players take advantage of the Ryzen Embedded platform, as well as the outstanding GPU performance to enable premium 4K visual experiences.

"The benefit of the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 and V1000 is it allowed us drive down the cost of multi-output 4K experiences," Chris Riegel, CEO of STRATACACHE. "Both the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 and R1000 provided us the graphics performance we needed in a single system on a chip that would have previously required more costly CPU and discrete GPU pairs, thereby saving us system costs and providing a smaller, more power efficient footprint that's powerful enough to run multiple 4K displays supporting our world class CMS platforms."

Netronome, a leader in high-performance, intelligent server and storage networking solutions, is using the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC for new advancements in networking solutions, security appliances and edge cloud computing. "The benefit of the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 for us is to expand our product range using the same high performance 'Zen' CPU cores, providing enterprise-class security features and leading-edge connectivity, as demonstrated in the larger Ryzen and EPYC processors," said Mike Benson, SVP of Systems and Platforms Engineering at Netronome. "Our customers want to make sure they have secure and performant devices that provide them a great value, and the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC combined with our Network Flow Processor does just that. We're excited to see the AMD Embedded portfolio expand and add it into our family of products."

Quixant is a global leader focusing exclusively on the design and manufacture of the most advanced PC-based computer systems and monitors for the global gaming industry. "As a highly-valued launch partner of the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC, we are excited to yet again bring high-performance embedded processing to the casino and gaming industry," said John Malin, global sales director, Quixant. "Our customers demand high quality graphics and displays, and AMD Ryzen embedded processors allow us to deliver that experience. Now with the new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC, we can continue to deliver that, but at a better price per performance, benefiting everybody. The first offering is the QXi-7000 LITE - our most versatile platform yet."

"With the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 powering the Atari VCS, we can support the 4K 60fps HDR content that users expect from a modern, secure gaming and entertainment system," said Michael Arzt, COO of Atari Connected Devices. "AMD's new Ryzen Embedded SoC will also help protect the VCS' environment and content as we support an unprecedented open-access model that allows Atari's highly-creative community to install any other operating system side by side with the Atari OS."

Availability
The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 will be available this quarter to ODMs and OEMs worldwide and is already supported by numerous hardware and software companies including Advantech, Alphainfo, ASRock Industrial, Axiomtech, DFI, iBase, Kontron, MEN, Mentor, Sapphire, zSpace and more.

As well, continuing a great partnership between the two companies, the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC supports the Mentor Embedded Linux Flex OS, which is available now.
For more information, visit this page.
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27 Comments on AMD Announces the Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC Series

#2
Ferrum Master
It is the prolly the same as the China Subor-Z console has.
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#3
IceShroom
Ferrum Master, post: 4032149, member: 90058"
It is the prolly the same as the China Subor-Z console has.
Nope. Its based on Raven Ridge die.
Subor-Z use different APU die.
Posted on Reply
#4
iO
This would make a really nice Netbook chip, if that form factor still existed..
IceShroom, post: 4032160, member: 175457"
Nope. Its based on Raven Ridge die.
Subor-Z use different APU die.
It isn't the Raven Ridge die either. It's a native dual core die codenamed Banded Kestrel.
Posted on Reply
#5
Hardware Geek
I'm excited to see how the Atari performs with this processor. The fact that it allows other OS installs makes me far more interested in it than I was. I had already decided not to get one, but I may reconsider once it is released depending on the performance.
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#6
las
Extremely low-end, might as well use ARM
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#7
yakk
VERY curious on products based on these, where can we get more information for products based on these?
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#8
notb
las, post: 4032304, member: 111974"
Extremely low-end, might as well use ARM
It's for embedded systems. What do you expect?

You run around news and call everything "low-end". Not everything is meant for 4K gaming.
Actually, this is a very "high-end" embedded chip.
Posted on Reply
#9
Valantar
Wait, these have dual 10GbE integrated? Hot damn, that was unexpexted. Here come the cheap high-performance PFSense routers, I guess?
Posted on Reply
#10
yakk
Valantar, post: 4032394, member: 171585"
Wait, these have dual 10GbE integrated? Hot damn, that was unexpexted. Here come the cheap high-performance PFSense routers, I guess?
Cha-ching! :clap:

Yes indeed! Perfect for personal servers amongst other uses... IOT... etc... I can see why there's quite a bit of excitement aibs these.
Posted on Reply
#11
notb
Valantar, post: 4032394, member: 171585"
Wait, these have dual 10GbE integrated? Hot damn, that was unexpexted. Here come the cheap high-performance PFSense routers, I guess?
Dual 10Gb is a market standard for low power server SoCs. Intel has been offering it for years. You can buy Xeon/EPYC SoCs with 4-8 x 10Gb LAN already.

I wonder what's AMD's plan for this lineup. This SoC looks like it was built for Atari. It could go against Intel NUC, but AMD isn't offering a competing line - they'll need an OEM partner.
AMD has been offering these R embedded SoCs for a while now. I've never seen them actually being used...
Posted on Reply
#12
Valantar
notb, post: 4032439, member: 165619"
Dual 10Gb is a market standard for low power server SoCs. Intel has been offering it for years. You can buy Xeon/EPYC SoCs with 4-8 x 10Gb LAN already.

I wonder what's AMD's plan for this lineup. This SoC looks like it was built for Atari. It could go against Intel NUC, but AMD isn't offering a competing line - they'll need an OEM partner.
AMD has been offering these R embedded SoCs for a while now. I've never seen them actually being used...
Intel offers that, true, but in expensive, relatively high core count Xeon D chips, not affordable (for server/embedded, that is) 2c4t chips, at least not that I've seen. Also, Intel makes its own ethernet controllers, which makes it far easier for them to integrate.

ASRock already has these new chips available on a NUC-size board, either bare or with a passively cooled case bundled. They're likely rarely seen as they're mostly used for embedded applications that don't ever pass by the retail market, with customers either designing their own solutions or ordering designs for their specific needs. Products like that rarely if ever see general availability.
Posted on Reply
#13
IceShroom
iO, post: 4032283, member: 107457"
It isn't the Raven Ridge die either. It's a native dual core die codenamed Banded Kestrel.
New die just for one product is not amd style.
Its a binned Reven Ridge die with very low power.
Posted on Reply
#14
notb
Valantar, post: 4032451, member: 171585"
Intel offers that, true, but in expensive, relatively high core count Xeon D chips, not affordable (for server/embedded, that is) 2c4t chips, at least not that I've seen. Also, Intel makes its own ethernet controllers, which makes it far easier for them to integrate.
Well... Xeon D are expensive just like the EPYC 3000-series that they compete with. :)
Intel also makes Pentium D, which this Ryzen Embedded is going to challenge.
ASRock already has these new chips available on a NUC-size board, either bare or with a passively cooled case bundled. They're likely rarely seen as they're mostly used for embedded applications that don't ever pass by the retail market, with customers either designing their own solutions or ordering designs for their specific needs. Products like that rarely if ever see general availability.
What I meant is I'm actually in the business where I see quite a few embedded SoCs, but only from Intel. Maybe it's because they're preferred in financial industry or in my country. No idea.

The last generation of AMD embedded SoC that had a big impact was Geode - so quite a few years ago. They're still ubiquitous. :)
But then again, Geode come from a time when AMD had 40%+ market share in CPUs, so it's quite logical.
Posted on Reply
#15
seronx
IceShroom, post: 4032453, member: 175457"
New die just for one product is not amd style.
Its a binned Reven Ridge die with very low power.
It's a new die.

Raven Ridge is 14nm+.
Picasso is 12nm.
Ryzen 3200u/Athlon 300U/R1000 is "14nm", but also Picasso.

Raven Ridge die uses 14nm+ FinFETs. It thus branched into two for Picasso; Low-cost 14nm FinFETs(Used in the low-end) and Enhanced 12nm FinFETs(Used in the high-end).
Posted on Reply
#16
Valantar
seronx, post: 4032522, member: 86156"
It's a new die.

Raven Ridge is 14nm+.
Picasso is 12nm.
Ryzen 3200u/Athlon 300U/R1000 is "14nm", but also Picasso.

Raven Ridge die uses 14nm+ FinFETs. It thus branched into two for Picasso; Low-cost 14nm FinFETs(Used in the low-end) and Enhanced 12nm FinFETs(Used in the high-end).
Ryzen 3000-series mobile APUs are 12nm (and advertised as such), not 14. They also implement the full Zen+ arch rather than the limited subset of Raven Ridge (which launched before Zen+ was fully ready). The launch info has been quite clear on that.
Posted on Reply
#17
seronx
Valantar, post: 4032543, member: 171585"
Ryzen 3000-series mobile APUs are 12nm (and advertised as such), not 14. They also implement the full Zen+ arch rather than the limited subset of Raven Ridge (which launched before Zen+ was fully ready). The launch info has been quite clear on that.
OPNs with OFG at the end are only 14nm.

Ryzen 3700U -> YM3700C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3500U -> YM3500C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3300U -> YM3300C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3200U -> YM3200C4T2OFG 14nm
Athlon 300U -> YM300UC4T2OFG 14nm

From a translation; Robert Hallock: "The CPU cores adopted by the second-generation Ryzen Mobile series and the Athlon 300U announced this time are all Zen+.

However, as pointed out, only two models of Ryzen 3 3200U and Athlon 300U were manufactured in 14 nm process. This comes from the cost of tapeout (final physical design) in conclusion. Since 12 nm process technology is an improved version of 14 nm process technology, it is possible to carry over everything, such as the layout of internal transistors in processor design, wiring design, and so on. However, the cost of tape-out is much cheaper at 14 nm, which is ripe. So we chose 14nm process for lower cost processors."

What isn't pointed out but is only revealed in Linkedin is that they are all derived from Raven Ridge.
Raven Ridge uses 14LPP+. Ryzen 3200U/Athlon 300U use a die orientated for quasi-Raven2 operation with 14nm (no plus) transistors. Ryzen 3300U and up use a die orientated at replacing Raven Ridge's 14LPP+, called "12LP Boost Plus".

https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/amd-ryzen-3-3200u
https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/amd-athlon-300u
https://www.amd.com/en/products/embedded-ryzen-r1000-series
Ryzen Embedded R1606G is a rebranded Ryzen 3200U.
Ryzen Embedded R1505G is a rebranded Athlon 300U.
Posted on Reply
#18
IceShroom
seronx, post: 4032561, member: 86156"
OPNs with OFG at the end are only 14nm.

Ryzen 3700U -> YM3700C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3500U -> YM3500C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3300U -> YM3300C4T4MFG 12nm
Ryzen 3200U -> YM3200C4T2OFG 14nm
Athlon 300U -> YM300UC4T2OFG 14nm

From a translation; Robert Hallock: "The CPU cores adopted by the second-generation Ryzen Mobile series and the Athlon 300U announced this time are all Zen+.

However, as pointed out, only two models of Ryzen 3 3200U and Athlon 300U were manufactured in 14 nm process. This comes from the cost of tapeout (final physical design) in conclusion. Since 12 nm process technology is an improved version of 14 nm process technology, it is possible to carry over everything, such as the layout of internal transistors in processor design, wiring design, and so on. However, the cost of tape-out is much cheaper at 14 nm, which is ripe. So we chose 14nm process for lower cost processors."

What isn't pointed out but is only revealed in Linkedin is that they are all derived from Raven Ridge.
Raven Ridge uses 14LPP+. Ryzen 3200U/Athlon 300U use a die orientated for quasi-Raven2 operation with 14nm (no plus) transistors. Ryzen 3300U and up use a die orientated at replacing Raven Ridge's 14LPP+, called "12LP Boost Plus".

https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/amd-ryzen-3-3200u
https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/amd-athlon-300u
https://www.amd.com/en/products/embedded-ryzen-r1000-series
Ryzen Embedded R1606G is a rebranded Ryzen 3200U.
Ryzen Embedded R1505G is a rebranded Athlon 300U.
I think rebranded is wrong word to discribe those model.
Should be, Embedded R1606G is embedded version of 3200U.
Posted on Reply
#19
danbert2000
If this performs close to a Ryzen 3 2200G, which looks likely due to the core counts for the CPU and GPU, then that Atari console does look like an interesting entry point into low performance PC gaming. Think Rocket League, Civ 6 on low, new games at 720p/30 FPS. But at that performance level and price, I'm afraid that direct comparisons to the PS4 or Xbox One are going to make it look like a bad choice unless you truly value the ability to run emulators, or tweak settings, or run non-game software. Linux on this box could make for a pretty good plug-and-go server.
Posted on Reply
#20
seronx
Nevermind on my previous statement, they are Raven2;

RV is left, RV2 is right. Different dies.
Posted on Reply
#21
GoldenX
I would love a 13' netbook/8' tablet with something like this.
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#22
Valantar
GoldenX, post: 4032720, member: 160319"
I would love a 13' netbook/8' tablet with something like this.
Ryzen mobile 3000-series laptops are trickling out already, so at least the former ought to be relatively common.
Posted on Reply
#23
R0H1T
seronx, post: 4032715, member: 86156"
Nevermind on my previous statement, they are Raven2;

RV is left, RV2 is right. Different dies.
Do you have any predictions about 14nm SOI for AMD?
Posted on Reply
#24
seronx
R0H1T, post: 4032825, member: 131092"
Do you have any predictions about 14nm SOI for AMD?
It probably won't happen. There is no actual advantage of SOI FinFET over Bulk FinFET other than eDRAM.

It is more likely that AMD would use 12FDX and 7FDX than 14HP;

^-- September 18th 2018 to November 20th, 2018 from Leti.

However, Zen is unlikely to be ported to FDSOI as it's the premium core. The only core that can maximize the effectiveness of FDSOI is something derived from 15h/Bulldozer, Piledriver, Steamroller, Excavator. This is all about the Vts used in each design. Jaguar/Zen are pretty even on LVT/RVT/HVT usage(which lends it to more fast ports(14nm->7nm->3nm)) and Bulldozer-Excavator is extremely heavy in RVT w/ sprinkles of HVT and and w/ littlest LVT usage. The main reason this is somewhat important is the bi-directional body bias capability from 12FDX. Which allows for FBB and RBB diodes to be used on the same transistor at different times. This would make the design flexible in post-fab on what market they want it to target; RBB-focus for IoT(Embedded) and FBB-focus for Mobility(Laptops).

It would only be the budget successors to these products;
https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/7th-gen-a6-9220c-apu
https://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/7th-gen-a4-9120c-apu
https://www.amd.com/en/products/embedded-g-series-3rd-gen-j-family

As the above is the only feasible products that have yet to get the "14nm" generation treatment. Jaguar is on 14nm, Zen is on 14nm, but nothing from the Bulldozer lineage is on 14nm nodes.

Zen is set for 7nm with the Zen2/Zen3, Jaguar is entering the upper-end of the A-series with the 14nm A9-9820 "Cato" SoC.
Posted on Reply
#25
R0H1T
Thanks for the info, I guess for SOI this is it.
Posted on Reply
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