Tuesday, May 28th 2019

Intel 10th Generation Core Case-badges Revealed

Intel laid rest to speculation that post 9th generation, it could replace its Core brand with something else. The 10th generation Core processors, built around the 10 nm "Ice Lake" microachitecture, will feature the first noteworthy IPC increments since "Skylake" thanks to their new "Sunny Cove" CPU cores. These will also feature DLBoost, a fixed-function matrix-multiplication hardware that speeds up deep-neural net building and training by 5x, as well as certain AVX-512 instructions. The cores will be optimized to cope with 2.4 Gbps 802.11ax Wi-Fi and faster Ethernet standards. The first of these chips will target mobile computing platforms, and will be quad-core parts like the dies pictured below. To save notebook PCB real-estate, Intel will put the processor and PCH dies into a multi-chip module. It will be quite a wait for the desktop implementation, but at least you know what their case-badges look like.
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55 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core Case-badges Revealed

#1
krykry
I'm appalled how they don't realize that such a move will be a catastrophe. Putting out low core count, mobile CPU as the representative of their 10th generation CPUs will work just the opposite they think it will.

If they want investors and consumers to stay with them, they need nothing less but a new architecture that would soundly beat Ryzen 3xxx series.
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#2
Vayra86
The fact this is a headline says it all, really.
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#3
ncrs
krykry, post: 4055759, member: 180882"
I'm appalled how they don't realize that such a move will be a catastrophe. Putting out low core count, mobile CPU as the representative of their 10th generation CPUs will work just the opposite they think it will.

If they want investors and consumers to stay with them, they need nothing less but a new architecture that would soundly beat Ryzen 3xxx series.
This is not the first time they put out a broken 10nm product just as a smoke screen for investors. The first one was i3-8121U - a dual-core processor that was so broken it had to have the iGPU disabled. According to rumors the yields for this model were below 1%. It cost Intel millions to make at most thousands of "full functioning" ones.
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#4
Landcross
I feel like Intel is doing as much as they can to push articles about AMD away. I feel like there have been much much more Intel articles last days than AMD articles, while Intel has barely any product to launch until the end of this year. I haven't fact checked that though, just a feeling so take it with a grain of salt ;)
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#5
champsilva
krykry, post: 4055759, member: 180882"
I'm appalled how they don't realize that such a move will be a catastrophe. Putting out low core count, mobile CPU as the representative of their 10th generation CPUs will work just the opposite they think it will.

If they want investors and consumers to stay with them, they need nothing less but a new architecture that would soundly beat Ryzen 3xxx series.
I don't know if you know, but CPUs for laptops sell more than desktop and AMD doesnot have anything new in this scenario?
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#6
ppn
The notebook market allows them to rebadge I3 as an I7 for more profit. How big is this thing, 8 core part will take only 20% more chip real estate to produce and 2 click copy paste operation. So now we wait. 20% IPC gain is quite something.
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#7
BorgOvermind
2000 - 180 nm
2002 - 130 nm
2004 - 90 nm
2006 - 65 nm
2008 - 45 nm
2010 - 32 nm
2012 - 22 nm
2014 - 14 nm -------|
2016 - 14 nm -------| ---> FAIL
2018 - 14 nm -------|
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#8
chaosmassive
WAKE UP, Intel
come on get back up and fight that AMD !

you know, I just want you guys fight and beat each other to death so I get either your CPU or AMD for cheap
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#9
EarthDog
BorgOvermind, post: 4055784, member: 89504"
2000 - 180 nm
2002 - 130 nm
2004 - 90 nm
2006 - 65 nm
2008 - 45 nm
2010 - 32 nm
2012 - 22 nm
2014 - 14 nm -------|
2016 - 14 nm -------| ---> FAIL
2018 - 14 nm -------|
Yeah, huuuuuuuuuuuge fail... until this moment, dominance in the market (performance wise) is now a fail? Nice.
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#10
I No
BorgOvermind, post: 4055784, member: 89504"
2000 - 180 nm
2002 - 130 nm
2004 - 90 nm
2006 - 65 nm
2008 - 45 nm
2010 - 32 nm
2012 - 22 nm
2014 - 14 nm -------|
2016 - 14 nm -------| ---> FAIL
2018 - 14 nm -------|
Very very very weak trolling mate.
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#11
Vayra86
BorgOvermind, post: 4055784, member: 89504"
2000 - 180 nm
2002 - 130 nm
2004 - 90 nm
2006 - 65 nm
2008 - 45 nm
2010 - 32 nm
2012 - 22 nm
2014 - 14 nm -------|
2016 - 14 nm -------| ---> FAIL
2018 - 14 nm -------|
Yeah its very strange that when complexity has increased over ten-fold, the R&D phase takes a bit longer. Very strange indeed. I smell a conspiracy. Aliens! THE BORG!
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#12
Basard
Holy shit, them are some nice stickers!:rolleyes:
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#13
dirtyferret
OMG! OMG! Intel's theoretical 18% IPC increase totally pwnd's AMD's theoretical 15% IPC increase....
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#14
Nkd
dirtyferret, post: 4055836, member: 95839"
OMG! OMG! Intel's theoretical 18% IPC increase totally pwnd's AMD's theoretical 15% IPC increase....
AMD was spot on with their IPC with zen and they will likely be spot on with zen 2.
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#15
kings
No surprise seeing Intel focus 10nm chips on laptops first!

This market is much bigger than desktop PCs and it is where AMD has less representation.
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#17
Imsochobo
kings, post: 4055875, member: 180022"
No surprise seeing Intel focus 10nm chips on laptops first!

This market is much bigger than desktop PCs and it is where AMD has less representation.
Also 10NM have less performance than their 14NM.
They have said this countless times, they cannot replace 14NM with 10nm in desktops because who would buy a 8700K with 20% less performance ?
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#18
HwGeek
Indeed, they went down from 4.8Ghz boos t[ i7-8665U ] to 4.1Ghz boost at same power envelop [25W/28W] so no 9900KS replacement for now.
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#19
TheGuruStud
HwGeek, post: 4055929, member: 185585"
Indeed, they went down from 4.8Ghz boos t[ i7-8665U ] to 4.1Ghz boost at same power envelop [25W/28W] so no 9900KS replacement for now.
Wait till you find out what the base clocks are (which is what these chips actually run at when tdp constrained). I predict they're stupid low. 10nm is just unusable.
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#20
Tomgang
10 NM. About dam time intel got something new out. But they are still behind as amd is on 7 NM. but i guess its better than nothing.

But it still nothing i am impressed by. Still quad-core yawn:wtf:. Wake up intel, its 2019 and not 2012. Quad-core cant really impresse any one these days.
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#21
HwGeek
TheGuruStud, post: 4055931, member: 42692"
Wait till you find out what the base clocks are (which is what these chips actually run at when tdp constrained). I predict they're stupid low. 10nm is just unusable.
Indeed, since good shrink should gave them more core and more clock at same TDP, like 3900X they got +300Mhz boost clock and 50% more cores at same TDP of 2700X.
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#22
Manu_PT
Intel is not worried at all. It would be as simple as dropping prices. Imagine dropping 9900k to 400€ and 9700k to 300€. They dont do it because they dont need to. They have the best performance.
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#23
TheGuruStud
Manu_PT, post: 4055941, member: 168799"
Intel is not worried at all. It would be as simple as dropping prices. Imagine dropping 9900k to 400€ and 9700k to 300€. They dont do it because they dont need to. They have the best performance.
Incorrect. They don't lower prices, b/c there's still enough idiots paying the Intel tax.
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#24
Metroid
TheGuruStud, post: 4055942, member: 42692"
Incorrect. They don't lower prices, b/c there's still enough idiots paying the Intel tax.
Well business wise they dont do it just yet because ryzen 3000 has not been released, things will change in about 8 weeks or so. AMD have done the same thing in 2006, I myself see the 9900k a fail, the 9700k a step in the right direction, hyperthreading must die but I dont see it happening now. As soon as we get around 16/32 cores, hyperthreading will be less and less used. Hyperthreading adds 50% more heat for 25% more performance + security issues. Is that good? only you can decide that, I myself dont think so.

Plus, Intel and AMD have been indirectly charging you $100 for hyperthreading/smt, know why? because it comprises 25% more multithreading performance, for example, the 9700k and 9900k.



The difference here is 342 points, that is 20 - 25% or so performance for hyperthreading.

Interesting enough reviews even here at tpu says that the 9900k consumes only 10% more power, in my and many other tests around the world differs from these reviews in that sense.



Do you really believe the 9900k consumes only 18 watts more than the 9700k, 100% multithreading? test it on intelburntest and see yourself your house burn together hehe

I made tons of tests with nehalen when hyperthreading came to exist, i7 920 used 350 watts with hyperthreading, without hyperthreading, around 180 watts and the same 25% multithreading performance that was at that time and the interesting thing was that, hyperthreading off my i7 920 4.2ghz used 1.18v stable 24/7, hyperthreading on used 1.40v stable. So I dont believe these numbers reviews throw on people regarding power consumption while hyperthreading is enabled.
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#25
efikkan
kings, post: 4055875, member: 180022"
No surprise seeing Intel focus 10nm chips on laptops first!

This market is much bigger than desktop PCs and it is where AMD has less representation.
Intel is still waiting for "10nm+" to be ready, and all 10nm products released this year will be produced on the first generation 10nm node ("10nm").

The first generation 10nm is not good enough for highly clocked chips and high yields, so it makes sense to use it for low power chips. And as you say, in terms of quantities, these low-powered mobile chips will ship in high volumes.

10nm+ has been delayed to next year, with Intel promising Ice Lake-SP shipping in Q2 2020.

Tomgang, post: 4055939, member: 154607"
10 NM. About dam time intel got something new out. But they are still behind as amd is on 7 NM. but i guess its better than nothing.
Intel "10nm" is comparable to TSMC's "7nm", these are just marketing names.
Intel were the first to ship products on this generation of high-power nodes; low volumes of Cannon Lake since April 2018 and I believe some FPGAs. In this quarter they will ship larger volumes of Ice Lake-U and Ice Lake-Y, but still only relative small chips. To date, AMD have shipped the largest chips on this new generation of nodes, but still no larger volume until Zen 2 starts to ship in Q3.

TSMC "7nm" seems to be in better shape than Intel's "10nm", so in that regard Intel is "behind", but not because of the naming.

Tomgang, post: 4055939, member: 154607"
But it still nothing i am impressed by. Still quad-core yawn:wtf:. Wake up intel, its 2019 and not 2012. Quad-core cant really impresse any one these days.
A quad core with this performance level and low TDP is unmatched and quite impressive.
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