Wednesday, July 10th 2019

Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel's short-term reaction to AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processor family is the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake." These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores, but have core-counts increased at the top-end, and HyperThreading enabled across the entire lineup. The Core i3 series are now 4-core/8-thread; the Core i5 series a 6-core/12-thread, the Core i7 series are 8-core/16-thread, and the new Core i9 series are 10-core/20-thread. Besides core-counts, Intel has given its 14 nanometer node one last step of refinement to come up with the new 14 nm+++ nodelet. This enables Intel to significantly dial up clock speeds across the board. These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards. These chips also appear to feature an on-package PCH, instead of chipset on the motherboard.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, a 10-core/20-thread chip clocked at 4.60 GHz with 5.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 20 MB of shared L3 cache, native support for DDR4-3200, and a TDP of 105 W. Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics. For this reason, all three processor models have the "F" brand extension denoting lack of integrated graphics. The i9-10900KF is closely followed by the i9-10900F clocked at 4.40/5.20 GHz, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and 95 W TDP rating. The most affordable 10-core part is the i9-10800F, clocked at 4.20 GHz with 5.00 GHz boost, and a TDP of just 65 W. Intel has set ambitious prices for these chips. The i9-10900KF is priced at $499, followed by the i9-10900F at $449, and the i9-10800F at $409.
The 10th generation Core i7 series, as we mentioned, consist of 8-core/16-thread processors. These are physically the same die found on the i9-9900K, but built on the new 14 nm+++ nodelet, and benefit from higher clock speeds. The Core i7-10700K clocked at 4.80 GHz with 5.10 GHz boost, offers 16 MB of shared L3 cache, Intel Gen9.5-based UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200. Intel is pricing the i7-10700K at $389. This is closely followed by the $339 Core i7-10700, which lacks an unlocked multiplier, ticks at 4.60 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, and comes with a 65 W TDP.

The 10th generation Core i5 family consist of 6-core/12-thread processors, which are physically similar to the Core i7-8700K, but fabbed on 14 nm+++. The Core i5-10600K offers an unlocked multiplier, clock speeds of 4.70 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, 12 MB of shared L3 cache, 95 W TDP, UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200 memory. This chip is priced at $269. It is closely followed by the i5-10600 clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and a $229 price-tag. Other Core i5 SKUs include the i5-10500 (4.40-4.50 GHz, $199 price), and i5-10400 (4.20-4.40 GHz, $179 price).

At the bottom of the pile is the new Core i3 family of 4-core/8-thread chips, which is surprisingly not physically simlar to the quad-core "Skylake" die, but is rather carved out from the 6-core silicon to give it 9 MB of shared L3 cache. The Core i3-10350K is price-matched with the i5-10400 at $179, offers an unlocked multiplier, and is clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, with a 95 W TDP. It's trailed by the i3-10320 (4.50-4.70 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, $159 price); and the i3-10300 (4.30-4.50 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, and $149 price). At the very bottom is the Core i3-10100. This 4-core/8-thread chip is configured with just 7 MB of L3 cache, 4.20-4.40 GHz clock-speeds, 65 W TDP, and a $129 price.

The 10th generation Panic Lake lacks PCIe gen 4.0, uses 32 Gbps DMI 3.0 chipset bus, and will be accompanied by the new 495-series chipset that sits on the same package as the CPU die, and talks to it over OPI, which is basically on-package DMI (32 Gbps). The CPU socket now puts out all of the platform connectivity on the motherboard. Among the connectivity options are one PCI-Express 3.0 x16 link meant for graphics, a handful USB 3.1 gen 2 and gen 1 ports, a few M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 slots, SATA 6 Gbps ports, HDA bus, and GbE PHY.

There's no information on when the 10th generation "Comet Lake" launches, but something tells us Intel will frantcally launch this platform to cut into 3rd gen Ryzen sales, because its desktop "Ice Lake" processor won't launch before 2020. Source: WCCFTech
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119 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

#51
Wavetrex
How come nobody mentioned so far the actual code-name for these CPUs?




Fake Lake.
Posted on Reply
#52
StrayKAT
I'm actually surprised. I figured Intel would actually reserve 10th gen for 10nm and throw parades and have a big ceremony sacrificing goats. Instead we get another i7.
Posted on Reply
#53
ppn
BoiseTech, post: 4078466, member: 183701"
IF this was real. I would have considered a 10/20 10900KF had Intel retained the 1151 (300) socket. Eff Intel forcing motherboard upgrades.... I'm going to put a 3950X into a B350, and it'll work great. No reason Intel has to do this to consumers.
Comet Lake is a SOC with iPCH. With intel you are going to put this 10900KF on a PCB with no chipset at all. So it will be cheaper as hell, The cost is reduce to a few VRMs DRAM slots and PCB. So why bother with AMD with their fake 7nm that has the real density of 14nm intel.
Posted on Reply
#54
BoiseTech
ppn, post: 4078534, member: 159444"
Comet Lake is a SOC with iPCH. With intel you are going to put this 10900KF on a PCB with no chipset at all. So it will be cheaper as hell, The cost is reduce to a few VRMs DRAM slots and PCB. So why bother with AMD with their fake 7nm that has the real density of 14nm intel.
LOL @ thinking an Intel board will be cheap. It just means more margins for mobo OEMs.
Posted on Reply
#55
ppn
Nah we will get the Z390 mobo $109 minus $47 for the Z390 and simplified production line. Asuming intel moves the PCH for desktop which I doubt also. But I would like to see this MITX chipseltess niceness. No more margins, the market won't allow it.
Posted on Reply
#56
trparky
ppn, post: 4078554, member: 159444"
the market won't allow it.
What? You've got to be kidding here man. There are fools out there that are more than willing to pay upwards of $700 for just a motherboard and you tell me the market won't accept that. Uh-huh, keep telling yourself that.

Case in point...
EVGA Z390 Dark, LGA 1151, Intel Z390, SATA 6GB/s, USB 3.1, M.2, U.2, EATX, Intel Motherboard 131-CS-E399-KR $850
That's just the cost of the motherboard, nothing else. No processor, no RAM, no video card... Just the motherboard and it costs $850!
Posted on Reply
#57
Aerpoweron
I am a little confused here. Doesn't SOC (System on a chip) mean that some kind of PCH is already included?

For AM4 on Wikipedia it says:
While the processors for this socket have been designed as systems on a chip (SoC), with the traditional northbridge and southbridge on board the processor, the motherboard chipset will increase the number of PCI Express lanes and other connectivity options. These connectivity options include: NVMe, SATA, and USB 3.1 Gen 2.
from

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_AM4#Chipsets

And you could still add more chipsets to the Intel Processor, if you have some kind of link to the outside of the cpu. Assuming this intel update is real, does it finally have more pci-e lanes? AMD now as 24, when you include the ones for the chipset. Intel has 20 since 2008. They just upgraded from PCI-E gen 1 to 3 since then.
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#58
TesterAnon
And they are still selling locked CPUs, real or not its a bad idea.
Posted on Reply
#59
kapone32
trparky, post: 4078556, member: 170376"
What? You've got to be kidding here man. There are fools out there that are more than willing to pay upwards of $700 for just a motherboard and you tell me the market won't accept that. Uh-huh, keep telling yourself that.

Case in point...
EVGA Z390 Dark, LGA 1151, Intel Z390, SATA 6GB/s, USB 3.1, M.2, U.2, EATX, Intel Motherboard 131-CS-E399-KR
Yep some of them are heavily influenced by the tech media so they go and buy a $1800 2080TI to play games at 1080P on a 120hz panel.
Posted on Reply
#60
trparky
Proof that a fool and his/her money are soon parted.

Intel can put as much as they possibly could onboard the PCB of the processor and the motherboard makers will still find a way to sell fools $600 motherboards just because they can.
Posted on Reply
#61
Aerpoweron
Has anybody noticed on the intel schematics, that the PCI-E lanes are on the PCH not the CPU-Die?

Did some reading and calculating. The OPI is a 4x DMI 3.0 connection. So 4 x 4 PCI-E 3.0 lanes. Which makes it 16 lanes.
Will be interesting to see if you could bottleneck it more easy than a traditional chipset design. Which had 16 lanes from the cpu and 4 lanes from cpu to the chipset.
Posted on Reply
#63
Aerpoweron
dirtyferret, post: 4078571, member: 95839"
Finally CPUs that can handle Crysis...
What do you mean by that? More MHz?
Posted on Reply
#64
dirtyferret
StrayKAT, post: 4078531, member: 174092"
I'm actually surprised. I figured Intel would actually reserve 10th gen for 10nm and throw parades and have a big ceremony sacrificing goats. Instead we get another i7.
They will be released on the 10th hour of the 10th day on the 10th month. The goats only come with the limited edition of the CPUs.

Aerpoweron, post: 4078573, member: 140366"
What do you mean by that? More MHz?
That after years of suffering PC Gamers will finally have a CPU to game with after Intel releases these 10th series CPU.
Posted on Reply
#65
ppn
The cheap MB option will exist for us. 65$ and it just works with any I9. It is Multi chip package, not System on chip yet, but one step away. under the heatspreader MCP is indistinguishable from SOC. But we won't see that for desktop, just mobile, PCH remains on the MB for the time being and every 2nd generation new socket.
Posted on Reply
#66
trparky
ppn, post: 4078578, member: 159444"
and every 2nd generation new socket.
The dumb part is that they don't have to do that! It's nothing more than a damn money grab on behalf of both Intel and the motherboard makers. They could easily support a socket and chipset for four years like AMD is doing with the AM4 socket but no, we can't have that in the Intel camp. Why? Because... reasons.
Posted on Reply
#67
15th Warlock
Rahmat Sofyan, post: 4078410, member: 98404"
what's next ?

dummy lake
cococolo lake
margarita lake
vodka lake
astalavista lake

14nm++++++ ?
Titicaca lake :roll:

Also, I hope they come up with a new numeric nomenclature, because those model numbers will be quite the mouthful: "core I nine, ten thousand, nine hundred, kay ef"? o_O
Posted on Reply
#68
efikkan
trparky, post: 4078581, member: 170376"
The dumb part is that they don't have to do that! It's nothing more than a damn money grab on behalf of both Intel and the motherboard makers. They could easily support a socket and chipset for four years like AMD is doing with the AM4 socket but no, we can't have that in the Intel camp. Why? Because... reasons.
We know the reasons why Intel have to change the chipset for Comet Lake; higher maximum TDP.
And no, it's not a money grab for Intel, they actually loose money on developing a new short-lived chipset.
But this isn't really a problem for buyers, almost nobody upgrade year after year, those few who do waste their money anyway.

I wish they planned ahead better and had a platform that spanned all revisions of a CPU architecture, but anything beyond that will risk compromising the support and stability. AM4's wide CPU support is no sunshine story, many early adopters already have lost support they were promised, and can we really trust that older hardware combinations get the same level of support going forward? I think there is a better balance somewhere between these two extremes from AMD and Intel.
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#69
BoiseTech
efikkan, post: 4078593, member: 150226"
We know the reasons why Intel have to change the chipset for Comet Lake; higher maximum TDP.
And no, it's not a money grab for Intel, they actually loose money on developing a new short-lived chipset.
But this isn't really a problem for buyers, almost nobody upgrade year after year, those few who do waste their money anyway.

I wish they planned ahead better and had a platform that spanned all revisions of a CPU architecture, but anything beyond that will risk compromising the support and stability. AM4's wide CPU support is no sunshine story, many early adopters already have lost support they were promised, and can we really trust that older hardware combinations get the same level of support going forward? I think there is a better balance somewhere between these two extremes from AMD and Intel.
If you process shrink, power savings should follow. They don't need a new socket, and yes it costs them money, but only so they can help out their partner mobo oems. Without OEM's making boards, you aren't going to sell CPUs. Intel does it to make their partners happy regardless of a small "loss" to develop a new socket standard.
Posted on Reply
#70
AsRock
TPU addict
Well if fake and would not be surprised that some one or intel have leaked this shit them self's to slow down AMD sales, shit wouldn't be the 1st time now.
Posted on Reply
#71
Vayra86
CrAsHnBuRnXp, post: 4078496, member: 44048"
Because when they decided to bump i3's from dual core to quad core (4c/4t) was bullshit too right? What makes this seem out of reach?
Spectre/Meltdown, for one ;)

HT is really not worth a whole lot when Intel itself recommends to turn it off on lots of CPUs. That tech really got a big dent, especially compared to SMT...

In terms of power its not out of reach, the parts aren't new in that sense, really. But don't fool yourself thinking 'the process gets better again'... it just gets rebalanced to fool us one more time. Better get your water chiller ready... Pretty questionable releases, these, and I already had that impression when they did 9th gen... Intel taking things too far, and of course its entirely luck of the draw if you have a half decent chip or a hot one that can barely sustain rated boost without burning a hole in your board. But hey, call yourself lucky that 600+ dollar CPU with a K can at least sustain base clocks! Completely retarded... They had the gall to tell us its better not to OC after all, even :D Now we know why - except Intel's Turbo is not AMD"s XFR. Its GPU boost all over again, except now Intel's boost is grossly inefficient.

NVM the fact that the source is fake, but when 10th is there, this applies nonetheless :p
Posted on Reply
#72
trparky
efikkan, post: 4078593, member: 150226"
they actually loose money on developing a new short-lived chipset.
So this then begs the question... If they lose money on creating new chipsets every time the traffic light at the end of the road turns red, why do it? Build a chipset for at least four years, that should cut down on the R&D and production costs.

Vayra86, post: 4078598, member: 152404"
Better get your water chiller ready
THIS!!! If you thought that the 9900K ran hot, imagine what it will be with two more cores for a total of ten. I don't even want to think about it.
Posted on Reply
#73
PanicLake
Panic Lake is utterly hilarious!
Posted on Reply
#74
phanbuey
PanicLake, post: 4078614, member: 188909"
Panic Lake is utterly hilarious!
Coffin Lake.
Posted on Reply
#75
Nevril
What is exactly happening to TPU?

This website and Anand are my only source of reliable info, and this piece of news cannot even be defined a "rumor".
Is clearly fake and coming from a source that's one of the worst (and no... those times when they seemingly got it right are irrelevant because they try for a given rumor to write all the possible outcomes in different articles in order to say "we were right or close" when the truth comes finally out - check it).

Ok, I get it, it generates clicks, but the reputation of TPU is definitely dented.
This piece should be edited with apologies. If it ends up to be (almost) true, then is when you should write about it and properly inform your readers.
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