Wednesday, July 10th 2019

Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel's short-term reaction to AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processor family is the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake." These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores, but have core-counts increased at the top-end, and HyperThreading enabled across the entire lineup. The Core i3 series are now 4-core/8-thread; the Core i5 series a 6-core/12-thread, the Core i7 series are 8-core/16-thread, and the new Core i9 series are 10-core/20-thread. Besides core-counts, Intel has given its 14 nanometer node one last step of refinement to come up with the new 14 nm+++ nodelet. This enables Intel to significantly dial up clock speeds across the board. These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards. These chips also appear to feature an on-package PCH, instead of chipset on the motherboard.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, a 10-core/20-thread chip clocked at 4.60 GHz with 5.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 20 MB of shared L3 cache, native support for DDR4-3200, and a TDP of 105 W. Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics. For this reason, all three processor models have the "F" brand extension denoting lack of integrated graphics. The i9-10900KF is closely followed by the i9-10900F clocked at 4.40/5.20 GHz, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and 95 W TDP rating. The most affordable 10-core part is the i9-10800F, clocked at 4.20 GHz with 5.00 GHz boost, and a TDP of just 65 W. Intel has set ambitious prices for these chips. The i9-10900KF is priced at $499, followed by the i9-10900F at $449, and the i9-10800F at $409.
The 10th generation Core i7 series, as we mentioned, consist of 8-core/16-thread processors. These are physically the same die found on the i9-9900K, but built on the new 14 nm+++ nodelet, and benefit from higher clock speeds. The Core i7-10700K clocked at 4.80 GHz with 5.10 GHz boost, offers 16 MB of shared L3 cache, Intel Gen9.5-based UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200. Intel is pricing the i7-10700K at $389. This is closely followed by the $339 Core i7-10700, which lacks an unlocked multiplier, ticks at 4.60 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, and comes with a 65 W TDP.

The 10th generation Core i5 family consist of 6-core/12-thread processors, which are physically similar to the Core i7-8700K, but fabbed on 14 nm+++. The Core i5-10600K offers an unlocked multiplier, clock speeds of 4.70 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, 12 MB of shared L3 cache, 95 W TDP, UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200 memory. This chip is priced at $269. It is closely followed by the i5-10600 clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and a $229 price-tag. Other Core i5 SKUs include the i5-10500 (4.40-4.50 GHz, $199 price), and i5-10400 (4.20-4.40 GHz, $179 price).

At the bottom of the pile is the new Core i3 family of 4-core/8-thread chips, which is surprisingly not physically simlar to the quad-core "Skylake" die, but is rather carved out from the 6-core silicon to give it 9 MB of shared L3 cache. The Core i3-10350K is price-matched with the i5-10400 at $179, offers an unlocked multiplier, and is clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, with a 95 W TDP. It's trailed by the i3-10320 (4.50-4.70 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, $159 price); and the i3-10300 (4.30-4.50 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, and $149 price). At the very bottom is the Core i3-10100. This 4-core/8-thread chip is configured with just 7 MB of L3 cache, 4.20-4.40 GHz clock-speeds, 65 W TDP, and a $129 price.

The 10th generation Panic Lake lacks PCIe gen 4.0, uses 32 Gbps DMI 3.0 chipset bus, and will be accompanied by the new 495-series chipset that sits on the same package as the CPU die, and talks to it over OPI, which is basically on-package DMI (32 Gbps). The CPU socket now puts out all of the platform connectivity on the motherboard. Among the connectivity options are one PCI-Express 3.0 x16 link meant for graphics, a handful USB 3.1 gen 2 and gen 1 ports, a few M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 slots, SATA 6 Gbps ports, HDA bus, and GbE PHY.

There's no information on when the 10th generation "Comet Lake" launches, but something tells us Intel will frantcally launch this platform to cut into 3rd gen Ryzen sales, because its desktop "Ice Lake" processor won't launch before 2020. Source: WCCFTech
Add your own comment

119 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

#101
trparky
Even if Intel does "launch" these processors I can't help but think it's going to be a "paper launch" simply to keep people who would think about going to AMD to hold off on their purchase in hopes that Intel will have something to buy. Oh sure, they might actually have processors to buy but good luck trying to get your hands on one though.

Remember the 8700K paper launch? Yeah...
Posted on Reply
#102
ToxicTaZ
trparky, post: 4079263, member: 170376"
Even if Intel does "launch" these processors I can't help but think it's going to be a "paper launch" simply to keep people who would think about going to AMD to hold off on their purchase in hopes that Intel will have something to buy. Oh sure, they might actually have processors to buy but good luck trying to get your hands on one though.

Remember the 8700K paper launch? Yeah...
I had my 8700K since November 2017 and was a very rock solid CPU for the last two years. Probably going to sell it on Ebay this November after I pick up my 9900KS. (If anyone is interested my 8700K can OC to 5.1GHz all cores AVX-0 Prime95 stability @1.4v)

9900KS is the last upgrade to the Intel 300 series boards.

9900KS is a cheaper alternative to binned Siliconlottery.com Delidded CPUs.

Intel 10 Generation is PCIe 4.0 as all next generation Xe video cards are PCIe 4.0 out of the box. I also heard USB 4.0 is on Intel 400 series boards.

Yes there is 10 cores coming Q4 2019 on new socket LGA is true but this article is fake as its not for shareholders.
Posted on Reply
#103
trparky
If I remember correctly the 8700K was really hard to come back initially when they first came out. Supplies were very constrained, most of the supply went to the OEMs and the retail channel got what was leftover.
Posted on Reply
#104
ToxicTaZ
trparky, post: 4079320, member: 170376"
If I remember correctly the 8700K was really hard to come back initially when they first came out. Supplies were very constrained, most of the supply went to the OEMs and the retail channel got what was leftover.
Depended on the retail outlet how many they bought! Intel only gives good deals to retailers when they buy in 1000s at a time.

I bought mine from Memory Express
Posted on Reply
#105
Vlada011
I hope Intel next generation is PCI-E 4.0. Because that's only hope for them.
That mean when Intel show up with next generation AMD could implement DDR5 and Intel will follow them with Extreme platform.
What you think is it i7-5820K capable to provide normal gaming performance until DDR5 show up. I think yes he can.
In one moment I thought to retire from hardware update, I was ready to borrow money for ASUS Dominator motherboard and Intel Xeon Gold, but then I gave up because AMD have same performance almost for less then half price.
But my next platform will be best I ever build. Anyway because economic situation in my region investing in processor with DDR4 IMC now will leave me with obsolete memory sooner or later but much before time for new upgrade.
Posted on Reply
#106
NicklasAPJ
trparky, post: 4078371, member: 170376"
And that's borderline lying.
Thats How it Works... is the same with Ryzen 3 It Said 4.6ghz boost clock. Yes That with XFR so IF your Lucky to Get a Good cpu and Got decent cooling that Can handle it, but Is like 5% who see 4.6ghz on one core. Thats Lying too.
Posted on Reply
#107
Midland Dog
HwGeek, post: 4078237, member: 185585"
Fake or Leaked on purpose to just stay relevant, but it won't be real product since even the 9900KS will be better CPU in gaming and some ADOBE style apps, so how they will justify the new socket cost?
Edit: another proof it's fake: Intel always adds small number on mem speed so you need to go and read the FOOTNOTES.
all of those reasons are valid but you missed the biggest giveaway, source: wccftech lmao
Posted on Reply
#108
Rahmat Sofyan
btarunr, post: 4078764, member: 43587"
Next Diarrhea Lake on 14 nm++++, same Skylake cores at 6.00 GHz boost. Buy a new motherboard to go with it.
lol, new socket for diarrhea , no thanks ..
Posted on Reply
#109
efikkan
Vlada011, post: 4079502, member: 110294"
I hope Intel next generation is PCI-E 4.0. Because that's only hope for them.
PCIe 4.0 is not going to be relevant for consumers for a while. I don't think even the few consumer SSDs with PCIe 4.0 can sustain that kind of speed.

Vlada011, post: 4079502, member: 110294"
That mean when Intel show up with next generation AMD could implement DDR5 and Intel will follow them with Extreme platform.
What you think is it i7-5820K capable to provide normal gaming performance until DDR5 show up. I think yes he can.
Your overclocked i7-5820K will be plenty for gaming for a few more years.
DDR5 only provides more bandwidth than DDR4, and more bandwidth only helps if you are bandwidth starved, which gaming is not. And if you were, you can just go for HEDT and get more memory channels.
Posted on Reply
#110
londiste
efikkan, post: 4080423, member: 150226"
PCIe 4.0 is not going to be relevant for consumers for a while. I don't think even the few consumer SSDs with PCIe 4.0 can sustain that kind of speed.
TPU's NVMe SSD scaling article states the problem pretty clearly - Sequential does have its uses and there are places where this is a huge boon but for normal (desktop/consumer) usage you primarily want to look at all the 4K results:
Posted on Reply
#111
efikkan
londiste, post: 4080443, member: 169790"
TPU's NVMe SSD scaling article states the problem pretty clearly - Sequential does have its uses and there are places where this is a huge boon but for normal (desktop/consumer) usage you primarily want to look at all the 4K results:
You do know that TLC and QLC SSDs uses a cache to reach peak speed?
You need like SLC or Optane to sustain such speeds.
Posted on Reply
#112
londiste
Yup. So top sequential speed is even more for show.
And yes, I get it that 4K needs SLC/Optane as much as sequential ;)

I really wish we had more Optane drive choices, especially M.2 form factor.
Right now, there is 800P that tops out at 118GB and is PCI-e 3.0 x2 and 905P that seems cool except the longer 22110 form factor :(
Posted on Reply
#113
ToxicTaZ
The only thing correct is Intel 10th generation is on a new socket LGA and 10 cores 5GHz CPU. Intel didn't even release the 9900KS TDP officially yet but 10th generation has TDP quotes? 9900KS will be most likely 95w base 4GHz and 195w for 5GHz Turbo would sound to be accurate.

Intel Xe is PCIe 4.0 based and wouldn't make any sense having there 400 series boards with PCIe 3.0 unless it has something to do with Icelake S memory controller is needed in the future? Meaning Intel could quote "PCIe 4.0 Reedy" boards.

Just think there's PCIe 5.0 & 6.0 coming...
Posted on Reply
#115
efikkan
ToxicTaZ, post: 4080472, member: 145598"
Intel Xe is PCIe 4.0 based and wouldn't make any sense having there 400 series boards with PCIe 3.0 unless it has something to do with Icelake S memory controller is needed in the future? Meaning Intel could quote "PCIe 4.0 Reedy" boards.
I agree with your point, but I'm not sure Intel have put that much planning into it. Remember that Comet Lake is yet another stop gap while we're waiting for Sunny Cove. We can hope the 400 series will be forward compatible, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
As for memory controller, those are located inside the CPUs these days, as long as the pinout is right, the motherboard can me made to support "anything".

ToxicTaZ, post: 4080472, member: 145598"
Just think there's PCIe 5.0 & 6.0 coming...
For servers.
Posted on Reply
#116
Vario
The 10th generation Panic Lake lacks PCIe gen 4.0...
more tabloid style writing from btarunr.
Posted on Reply
#117
ArchStupid
hojnikb, post: 4078424, member: 148747"
14nm when everyone else is at 10 or even 7nm ? Weak.
You probably shouldn't comment on things you don't understand, the size of the transistors is irrelevant; only the density of the transistors matters - and in this metric Intel's 14nm process is largely equivalent to the 7nm glued together CPUs these Taiwanese factories produce - hence the similar performance and power consumption.
Posted on Reply
#118
LDNL
Those "leaked" slides are fake thus the whole article is bs. Intel confirmed this. Please update/remove the article.
Posted on Reply
#119
Vlada011
I'm so happy because nothing attractive is on horizon and give me more time to save money for something worth of investment.
Who invest in PCI-E 3.0 now could freely to gave up from enthusiasm club.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment