Wednesday, July 10th 2019

Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel's short-term reaction to AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processor family is the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake." These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores, but have core-counts increased at the top-end, and HyperThreading enabled across the entire lineup. The Core i3 series are now 4-core/8-thread; the Core i5 series a 6-core/12-thread, the Core i7 series are 8-core/16-thread, and the new Core i9 series are 10-core/20-thread. Besides core-counts, Intel has given its 14 nanometer node one last step of refinement to come up with the new 14 nm+++ nodelet. This enables Intel to significantly dial up clock speeds across the board. These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards. These chips also appear to feature an on-package PCH, instead of chipset on the motherboard.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, a 10-core/20-thread chip clocked at 4.60 GHz with 5.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 20 MB of shared L3 cache, native support for DDR4-3200, and a TDP of 105 W. Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics. For this reason, all three processor models have the "F" brand extension denoting lack of integrated graphics. The i9-10900KF is closely followed by the i9-10900F clocked at 4.40/5.20 GHz, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and 95 W TDP rating. The most affordable 10-core part is the i9-10800F, clocked at 4.20 GHz with 5.00 GHz boost, and a TDP of just 65 W. Intel has set ambitious prices for these chips. The i9-10900KF is priced at $499, followed by the i9-10900F at $449, and the i9-10800F at $409.
The 10th generation Core i7 series, as we mentioned, consist of 8-core/16-thread processors. These are physically the same die found on the i9-9900K, but built on the new 14 nm+++ nodelet, and benefit from higher clock speeds. The Core i7-10700K clocked at 4.80 GHz with 5.10 GHz boost, offers 16 MB of shared L3 cache, Intel Gen9.5-based UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200. Intel is pricing the i7-10700K at $389. This is closely followed by the $339 Core i7-10700, which lacks an unlocked multiplier, ticks at 4.60 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, and comes with a 65 W TDP.

The 10th generation Core i5 family consist of 6-core/12-thread processors, which are physically similar to the Core i7-8700K, but fabbed on 14 nm+++. The Core i5-10600K offers an unlocked multiplier, clock speeds of 4.70 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, 12 MB of shared L3 cache, 95 W TDP, UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200 memory. This chip is priced at $269. It is closely followed by the i5-10600 clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and a $229 price-tag. Other Core i5 SKUs include the i5-10500 (4.40-4.50 GHz, $199 price), and i5-10400 (4.20-4.40 GHz, $179 price).

At the bottom of the pile is the new Core i3 family of 4-core/8-thread chips, which is surprisingly not physically simlar to the quad-core "Skylake" die, but is rather carved out from the 6-core silicon to give it 9 MB of shared L3 cache. The Core i3-10350K is price-matched with the i5-10400 at $179, offers an unlocked multiplier, and is clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, with a 95 W TDP. It's trailed by the i3-10320 (4.50-4.70 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, $159 price); and the i3-10300 (4.30-4.50 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, and $149 price). At the very bottom is the Core i3-10100. This 4-core/8-thread chip is configured with just 7 MB of L3 cache, 4.20-4.40 GHz clock-speeds, 65 W TDP, and a $129 price.

The 10th generation Panic Lake lacks PCIe gen 4.0, uses 32 Gbps DMI 3.0 chipset bus, and will be accompanied by the new 495-series chipset that sits on the same package as the CPU die, and talks to it over OPI, which is basically on-package DMI (32 Gbps). The CPU socket now puts out all of the platform connectivity on the motherboard. Among the connectivity options are one PCI-Express 3.0 x16 link meant for graphics, a handful USB 3.1 gen 2 and gen 1 ports, a few M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 slots, SATA 6 Gbps ports, HDA bus, and GbE PHY.

There's no information on when the 10th generation "Comet Lake" launches, but something tells us Intel will frantcally launch this platform to cut into 3rd gen Ryzen sales, because its desktop "Ice Lake" processor won't launch before 2020. Source: WCCFTech
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119 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

#26
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
TheLostSwede, post: 4078222, member: 3382"
Apparently a fake. One giveaway is the placement of the $ sign in the pricing. A US company would always put the $ before the numbers. Only Europeans put the € sign after the numbers.
Socket details are correct though, from what I know.
Good catch.

Tomgang, post: 4078325, member: 154607"
But dont worry, we have panic lake
I love that! :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#28
trparky
I really do wish that Intel would stop with their "65 W TDP" garbage already. Sure, it's got a 65 W TDP when at stock speeds but let's not fool ourselves here, when it gets anywhere near their boost speeds the TDP shoot through the freakin' roof. And then there's overclocking where the TDP is... yeah, you get the idea. Again Intel needs to stop lying about their TDP already and admit that their chips run damn hot.
Posted on Reply
#29
neatfeatguy
Folks saying the "$" after the price means it's a fake....

English (States/UK area) writing countries tend to always have the $ at the front of the amount. However, not all countries place the $ at the front of the dollar amount. It's not a common thing, but you do see it from time to time with the $ at the end of the amount.

Kind of like how in Spanish when you have an exclamation point ( ! ) at the end of a sentence, the sentence is started with an inverted exclamation point ( ¡ ) - It looks odd, but that's just how it's done. If it's something you're not familiar with, you might think the person doing it isn't quite right in the head.
Posted on Reply
#30
trparky
NicklasAPJ, post: 4078331, member: 136240"
Intel TDP is at The base clock, not boost
And that's borderline lying.
Posted on Reply
#31
londiste
trparky, post: 4078369, member: 170376"
I really do wish that Intel would stop with their "64 W TDP" garbage already. Sure, it's got a 65 W TDP when at stock speeds but let's not fool ourselves here, what it gets anywhere near their boost speeds the TDP shoot through the freakin' roof. And then there's overclocking where the TDP is... yeah, you get the idea. Again Intel needs to stop lying about their TDP already and admit that their chips run damn hot.
How do you feel about AMD's new approach in Ryzen 3000:
https://www.anandtech.com/show/14605/the-and-ryzen-3700x-3900x-review-raising-the-bar/19
Posted on Reply
#33
Manu_PT
Damn, all it takes is some random leaks about something INtel might (or not) release, and everyone goes crazy with insults and hate. Now imagine if this was remotely true. Enjoy your new AMD CPUs guys, are you fearing something? :)
Posted on Reply
#35
Vayra86
bug, post: 4078257, member: 157434"
Seriously, I'm not avoiding wtftech just to see it religiously quoted on my favorite tech news site.

Not so seriously, but all these jokes about Intel's 14nm and nobody thought about 14nm# yet?
#ShrinkMeToo
Posted on Reply
#36
CrAsHnBuRnXp
interesting if true. Id be very curious to see the numbers compared to the new Ryzen 3000 series. If intel still reigns supreme here, the only way AMD can win is by doing what intel did when they released the C2D lineup.

Will AMD ever be top dog again?
Posted on Reply
#37
Midland Dog
s3thra, post: 4078231, member: 186348"
Two immediate tells that this is fake:
  1. the $ sign a the end of the pricing figures
  2. Source: WCCFTech
We have to stop recycling their garbage, this is TPU.
yeah i was gunna say who the hell thought that wccftech was a reliable source, only thing reliable about wccftech is that its unreliable
Posted on Reply
#38
Rahmat Sofyan
what's next ?

dummy lake
cococolo lake
margarita lake
vodka lake
astalavista lake

14nm++++++ ?
Posted on Reply
#39
Bones
CrAsHnBuRnXp, post: 4078396, member: 44048"
interesting if true. Id be very curious to see the numbers compared to the new Ryzen 3000 series. If intel still reigns supreme here, the only way AMD can win is by doing what intel did when they released the C2D lineup.

Will AMD ever be top dog again?
You have to remember both companies are a business, not a catering service to us and if you expect that, you're on the wrong track.
They will cater but only so far as it suits/profits them to do so.
And if it doesn't, they won't.

All I can say is alot of the arguements in favor towards Intel stresses gaming performance, in fact if you were to look around at all the back and forth over who's better it's almost always an arguement over Intel being better at gaming, that being the bulk if not the entire basis of arguement.
BTW note I stressed almost, not always here.

That may be true but there is much more to being "Better" than basing it mostly if not all on gaming alone.

ALL aspects of computing has to be taken into account, it's not like Intels have the sole purpose of gaming useage and nothing else, just like an AMD.

Intels are overall better for gaming and a few other things, AMD's have their own advantages as well with other aspects of computing, all that can't be denied.
We all know as fact the x86 compiler favors Intel anyway which accounts for at least some of the difference in many areas of it, but now that AMD has improved so much that advantage is diminishing. Software creators in the past favored Intel too, another fact of the matter in which things like it were discovered and exposed - It's just simple fact when it comes down to it Intel doesn't play "Nice" or even fair.

AMD in turn has had it's share of gaffs too with BD being the most obvious of these - Talk about disappointment!
And to be fair towards Intel, I'm sure any advantage that could be leveraged by AMD would be too and undoubtedly has been before.

In short, each has it's own advantages and disadvantages for many reasons as to why they do or don't.

I'm not going to play the game of who's better - I'm going to go with what suits my particular needs best which is, THB the best way to choose what you'd get in any instance.
~Over and out. :D
Posted on Reply
#40
Vayra86
rtwjunkie, post: 4078345, member: 56774"
Good catch.


I love that! :laugh:
How about Tampon Lake to stop the bleeding...
Posted on Reply
#41
Crackong
All Hyper Threading Enabled? Must be Fake
Posted on Reply
#42
hojnikb
14nm when everyone else is at 10 or even 7nm ? Weak.
Posted on Reply
#43
ppn
4 core sunny cove is only 40% smaller than 4 core comet lake so there is no point movig to 10nm yet, and it drops 1Ghz clocks. What AMD has is not even 7nm, we have NAVI with 10.3 Mtr on 251 mm^2 to show for it, and that is not 7nm it is not even 10nm, because 10nm by tsmc is something like 50 Mtr/mm^2, and NAVI is 41. who knows what it is exaclty. intel 14nm is 44, 10nm is 101 Mtr/mm^2 and 7nm EUV 237 Mtr/mm2. so AMD being on 7nm is a bit misleading.
Posted on Reply
#44
chodaboy19
The 10th generation Panic Lake
This is gold :D
Posted on Reply
#45
john_
Intel's slides always put the high end models on top, never on bottom.

Either someone in Intel created this slide with every little error he/she could think and leaked it on the net, so that they can see reactions, or just to keep people from buying AMD CPUs and wait(I wonder why when you force them to buy another PCIe 3.0 motherboard), or, as many said, it's fake.
Posted on Reply
#46
efikkan
Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics.
<snip>
The 10th generation Core i7 series, as we mentioned, consist of 8-core/16-thread processors. These are physically the same die found on the i9-9900K, but built on the new 14 nm+++ nodelet, and benefit from higher clock speeds.
This is incorrect. We already know from the Linux drivers that Comet Lake-S will exist in 6-core and 10-core die configurations, both with integrated graphics. 8- and 4-core models will be achieved with disabling cores.

-----

Nobody should take this "leak" seriously. Not only is it full of "mistakes", completed clocks and price would also indicate that the launch is imminent, but everything so far indicates it's not coming that soon.

It's also worth mentioning that engineering samples of 10-core Cascade Lake-X had a base clock of 4.0 GHz, and I would find it strange if Comet Lake-S dropped down to just 3.4 GHz.
Posted on Reply
#47
BoiseTech
IF this was real. I would have considered a 10/20 10900KF had Intel retained the 1151 (300) socket. Eff Intel forcing motherboard upgrades.... I'm going to put a 3950X into a B350, and it'll work great. No reason Intel has to do this to consumers.
Posted on Reply
#48
CrAsHnBuRnXp
Crackong, post: 4078421, member: 185495"
All Hyper Threading Enabled? Must be Fake
Because when they decided to bump i3's from dual core to quad core (4c/4t) was bullshit too right? What makes this seem out of reach?
Posted on Reply
#49
Dave65
Turmania, post: 4078259, member: 182201"
What is panic lake as stated in the article.
I just DIED LAUGHING MY ASS OFF over that:roll:
Posted on Reply
#50
Franzen4Real
Rahmat Sofyan, post: 4078410, member: 98404"
what's next ?

dummy lake
cococolo lake
margarita lake
vodka lake
astalavista lake

14nm++++++ ?
Careful, that could end up getting quoted and on the news feed tomorrow.

Who knows, maybe the 10th gen also has an i9 10900BTA... This version disengages your brain, and hardware locks your PC to only allow the functions Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V to work.
Posted on Reply
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