Wednesday, July 10th 2019

Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel's short-term reaction to AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processor family is the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake." These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores, but have core-counts increased at the top-end, and HyperThreading enabled across the entire lineup. The Core i3 series are now 4-core/8-thread; the Core i5 series a 6-core/12-thread, the Core i7 series are 8-core/16-thread, and the new Core i9 series are 10-core/20-thread. Besides core-counts, Intel has given its 14 nanometer node one last step of refinement to come up with the new 14 nm+++ nodelet. This enables Intel to significantly dial up clock speeds across the board. These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards. These chips also appear to feature an on-package PCH, instead of chipset on the motherboard.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, a 10-core/20-thread chip clocked at 4.60 GHz with 5.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 20 MB of shared L3 cache, native support for DDR4-3200, and a TDP of 105 W. Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics. For this reason, all three processor models have the "F" brand extension denoting lack of integrated graphics. The i9-10900KF is closely followed by the i9-10900F clocked at 4.40/5.20 GHz, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and 95 W TDP rating. The most affordable 10-core part is the i9-10800F, clocked at 4.20 GHz with 5.00 GHz boost, and a TDP of just 65 W. Intel has set ambitious prices for these chips. The i9-10900KF is priced at $499, followed by the i9-10900F at $449, and the i9-10800F at $409.
The 10th generation Core i7 series, as we mentioned, consist of 8-core/16-thread processors. These are physically the same die found on the i9-9900K, but built on the new 14 nm+++ nodelet, and benefit from higher clock speeds. The Core i7-10700K clocked at 4.80 GHz with 5.10 GHz boost, offers 16 MB of shared L3 cache, Intel Gen9.5-based UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200. Intel is pricing the i7-10700K at $389. This is closely followed by the $339 Core i7-10700, which lacks an unlocked multiplier, ticks at 4.60 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, and comes with a 65 W TDP.

The 10th generation Core i5 family consist of 6-core/12-thread processors, which are physically similar to the Core i7-8700K, but fabbed on 14 nm+++. The Core i5-10600K offers an unlocked multiplier, clock speeds of 4.70 GHz with 4.90 GHz boost, 12 MB of shared L3 cache, 95 W TDP, UHD 730 graphics, and native support for DDR4-3200 memory. This chip is priced at $269. It is closely followed by the i5-10600 clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and a $229 price-tag. Other Core i5 SKUs include the i5-10500 (4.40-4.50 GHz, $199 price), and i5-10400 (4.20-4.40 GHz, $179 price).

At the bottom of the pile is the new Core i3 family of 4-core/8-thread chips, which is surprisingly not physically simlar to the quad-core "Skylake" die, but is rather carved out from the 6-core silicon to give it 9 MB of shared L3 cache. The Core i3-10350K is price-matched with the i5-10400 at $179, offers an unlocked multiplier, and is clocked at 4.60 GHz with 4.80 GHz boost, with a 95 W TDP. It's trailed by the i3-10320 (4.50-4.70 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, $159 price); and the i3-10300 (4.30-4.50 GHz, 9 MB L3 cache, and $149 price). At the very bottom is the Core i3-10100. This 4-core/8-thread chip is configured with just 7 MB of L3 cache, 4.20-4.40 GHz clock-speeds, 65 W TDP, and a $129 price.

The 10th generation Panic Lake lacks PCIe gen 4.0, uses 32 Gbps DMI 3.0 chipset bus, and will be accompanied by the new 495-series chipset that sits on the same package as the CPU die, and talks to it over OPI, which is basically on-package DMI (32 Gbps). The CPU socket now puts out all of the platform connectivity on the motherboard. Among the connectivity options are one PCI-Express 3.0 x16 link meant for graphics, a handful USB 3.1 gen 2 and gen 1 ports, a few M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 slots, SATA 6 Gbps ports, HDA bus, and GbE PHY.

There's no information on when the 10th generation "Comet Lake" launches, but something tells us Intel will frantcally launch this platform to cut into 3rd gen Ryzen sales, because its desktop "Ice Lake" processor won't launch before 2020. Source: WCCFTech
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119 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

#76
PanicLake
phanbuey, post: 4078631, member: 45008"
Coffin Lake.
Too soon!
Posted on Reply
#77
Vayra86
Nevril, post: 4078632, member: 188910"
What is exactly happening to TPU?

This website and Anand are my only source of reliable info, and this piece of news cannot even be defined a "rumor".
Is clearly fake and coming from a source that's one of the worst (and no... those times when they seemingly got it right are irrelevant because they try for a given rumor to write all the possible outcomes in different articles in order to say "we were right or close" when the truth comes finally out - check it).

Ok, I get it, it generates clicks, but the reputation of TPU is definitely dented.
This piece should be edited with apologies. If it ends up to be (almost) true, then is when you should write about it and properly inform your readers.
Yes, an update is definitely in order here.
Posted on Reply
#78
efikkan
BoiseTech, post: 4078595, member: 183701"
If you process shrink, power savings should follow. They don't need a new socket, and yes it costs them money, but only so they can help out their partner mobo oems. Without OEM's making boards, you aren't going to sell CPUs. Intel does it to make their partners happy regardless of a small "loss" to develop a new socket standard.
Coffee Lake (and Comet Lake) were not planned initially. Intel were hoping to move to 10nm, then switch to Ice Lake and so on.
Comet Lake will still be on 14nm, so there is no major power savings.

trparky, post: 4078600, member: 170376"
So this then begs the question... If they lose money on creating new chipsets every time the traffic light at the end of the road turns red, why do it? Build a chipset for at least four years, that should cut down on the R&D and production costs.
Because plans change.
Initially Intel planned:
Skylake (2015) new chipset
Cannon Lake (2016) 10nm
Ice Lake (2017) new chipset
Tiger Lake (2018)
And then it started to go downhill; Kaby Lake, Coffee Lake, Coffee Lake v2, Comet Lake…
It's poor planning from Intel, and lack of headroom and good backup plans.

trparky, post: 4078600, member: 170376"
If you thought that the 9900K ran hot, imagine what it will be with two more cores for a total of ten. I don't even want to think about it.
The problem for i9-9900K is not heat, but energy density.
Posted on Reply
#81
TheLostSwede
Aerpoweron, post: 4078564, member: 140366"
Has anybody noticed on the intel schematics, that the PCI-E lanes are on the PCH not the CPU-Die?

Did some reading and calculating. The OPI is a 4x DMI 3.0 connection. So 4 x 4 PCI-E 3.0 lanes. Which makes it 16 lanes.
Will be interesting to see if you could bottleneck it more easy than a traditional chipset design. Which had 16 lanes from the cpu and 4 lanes from cpu to the chipset.
As I pointed out earlier, that diagram is of a mobile CPU/chipset combo package. Desktop CPUs don't have MIPI CSI camera interfaces.
Posted on Reply
#82
Vlada011
PCI-E 3.0 is very bad and sad news for new Intel platform.
Because that could be better product then AMD Ryzen 2.
To bad, small number of people will invest in PCI-E 3.0 and Intel can't change that fact.

I think this news will be nail in coffin of people who decide to delay upgrade and wait next Intel, because someone to stay next 3-4 years on PCI-E 3.0. That's insane.
Posted on Reply
#83
efikkan
This is just the typical "leaks" we get when there is an "information vacuum", someone just picks up on rumors and make some "qualified guesses" and calls it a leak.

But regardless, Intel is preparing Comet Lake-S, and it's coming "soon".
Posted on Reply
#84
Vlada011
When Intel write article PCI-E 4.0 mean nothing for games they thought enthusiasts have 10x HDD and 2x SSD SATA III for system and gaming.
They forgot that last 3-4 years enthusiasts invest like crazy in PCI-E SSDs and M.2 NVMe SSDs who directly depend of PCI-E Interface.
Improvement of M.2 connected to AMD CPU or AMD X570 PCH will be much faster then Intel's system.
And today PC is small box with one 1-2 M.2 on motherboards, maybe PCI-E SSD, maybe not and one SSD SATA III for storage.
They don't want SATA Power cables, SATA Cables, HDDs any more. They want system device to hand to mobo like memory or CPU and Intel is inferior in such situation.
10th Gen will left mark as i7-5775C Broadwell and will be forgotten for 2 months.
I mean it's not USB 3.1, or Network-Wi-Fi controller. This is for new generation same as before SATA II vs SATA III.
And if AMD is smart they will bombing market with news about performance of system with PCI-E 4.0 Interface.

Because now for 850$ you beat i9-9980XE, Year old premium Intel CPU worth 2000$. I mean for 850$ you pay and 12 core CPU and Crosshair VIII Hero.
If no more money system could boot with any DDR4 to work until you save money for new faster DDR4.
Investing in PCI-E 3.0 is oppose to enthusiasm, that have name. Intel's victim. Victim of Intel's politic because fanboyism.
And 10 cores to work all of them stable on 5.2GHz can't outperform 3900X.
Posted on Reply
#85
mcraygsx
This article gave me laugh three times. Let me list them in order.

"These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores" :laugh:

"These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards " :D

"Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, " WOW what is long list of numbers for merely a mainstream processor. :banghead:

Probably fake but very amusing.
Posted on Reply
#87
Patriot
Takes a blind fanboi to call this news, this is wishful thinking and a poor fake. bt should be ashamed.
Posted on Reply
#88
dont whant to set it"'
Simply awed at the traction the comment section gave itself to this site post.
Oh and what is that kind of shiny thing on the floor sitting in the dark, is it a button?

Could not mind less, more is better for less $ till quantum computers/calculator call them what you will, that is if those are fesile.

why this mm^2 on bigger node is this and not that on a smaller node? because cache and other internals;

Ranty Pamflet of mine : "We at Intel as Intel are like a dam , we keep ''IP'' in the reservoir and only trickle it trough the power generation part of the plant to generate capital, we'll be milking this reservoir till the end of time and beyond."

It's hard work be it either side or camp you on or simpatheize with or on , both physicly and mentally, Respect.
Posted on Reply
#89
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Rahmat Sofyan, post: 4078410, member: 98404"
what's next ?

dummy lake
cococolo lake
margarita lake
vodka lake
astalavista lake

14nm++++++ ?
Next Diarrhea Lake on 14 nm++++, same Skylake cores at 6.00 GHz boost. Buy a new motherboard to go with it.
Posted on Reply
#90
z1n0x
Comet Comic Lake?
Posted on Reply
#91
Prima.Vera
So when can we have CPU+Mobo with PCI-E 4.0, USB 4.0 and DDR5?
Until then I'm chillin' with my good ol' 3770K CPU.
Posted on Reply
#92
Hotobu
Prima.Vera, post: 4078799, member: 98685"
So when can we have CPU+Mobo with PCI-E 4.0, USB 4.0 and DDR5?
Until then I'm chillin' with my good ol' 3770K CPU.
2021 should be a very good year for you.
Posted on Reply
#93
Bwaze
How come source, WCCFTech has the info carefully worded that this is an "alleged leak", but TechPoweUP has it published as a straightforward info?

"Intel’s 10th Gen ‘Comet Lake’ Desktop CPU Lineup Allegedly Leaks Out – Core i9-10900KF Flagship With 10 Cores, 20 Threads, 5.2 GHz Boost at $499 US, 8 Cores Start at $339 US, 6 Cores at $179 US"

Wh, doesn't TechPowerUP article come up with the same warning flags, "allegedly", "leak"?
Posted on Reply
#94
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
ArchStupid, post: 4078388, member: 61174"
This "article" is a disgrace to TPU.
Integrity as a concept is way less interesting than clicks and eyeballs, both of which this thing provides. It's just how it is, gotta make the dough somehow.

Bwaze, post: 4078803, member: 178959"
How come source, WCCFTech has the info carefully worded that this is an "alleged leak", but TechPoweUP has it published as a straightforward info?

"Intel’s 10th Gen ‘Comet Lake’ Desktop CPU Lineup Allegedly Leaks Out – Core i9-10900KF Flagship With 10 Cores, 20 Threads, 5.2 GHz Boost at $499 US, 8 Cores Start at $339 US, 6 Cores at $179 US"

Wh, doesn't TechPowerUP article come up with the same warning flags, "allegedly", "leak"?
Do you know how hard it is to spell allegedly?
Posted on Reply
#95
JalleR
9MB (2.25mb pr core) in the 4 core processor when non of the other models have 2.25MB pr core that looks like Fanboy Lake, but it could be made out of a 6 core Chip but why not give it 5 cores aswell :D
Posted on Reply
#97
jabbadap
Prima.Vera, post: 4078799, member: 98685"
So when can we have CPU+Mobo with PCI-E 4.0, USB 4.0 and DDR5?
Until then I'm chillin' with my good ol' 3770K CPU.
Have to go for AMD for that, if it's have to be x86. Intel will go straight to pcie gen5 as they have downplayed gen4 all the time.

Good luck for having that in near future though, current Intel and their roadmaps. But alas, if and when they get their manufacturing woes under control they have all the abilities to deliver.
Posted on Reply
#98
hapkiman
This article is as credible as a dollar one, or 1.00 $.
Posted on Reply
#99
nemesis.ie
TheLostSwede, post: 4078222, member: 3382"
Only Europeans put the € sign after the numbers.
Non-English speaking Europeans, English-speaking (i.e. where English is the language of the country) Europeans have the € sign at the front. ;)
Posted on Reply
#100
TheLostSwede
nemesis.ie, post: 4079114, member: 22637"
Non-English speaking Europeans, English-speaking (i.e. where English is the language of the country) Europeans have the € sign at the front. ;)
Well, I speak English... :p
I don't really care what the norm is, to me it looks stupid to put the currency sign after the numbers.
But yeah, I forgot you use Euro in Ireland too...

In all fairness, we put in first in Sweden too, even though we write the letters for our own currency behind, but that might be because it's not a currency symbol?
Posted on Reply
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