Tuesday, September 10th 2019

LG Unveils First OLED TVs with NVIDIA G-SYNC Support

LG Electronics (LG) has joined forces with NVIDIA to make gamers' dreams come true, adding support for NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility to its stunning 2019 OLED TVs (model 65/55E9, model 77/65/55C9). LG's newest OLED products offer blazing speed and stunning color reproduction, their superior performance and image quality validated through NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible testing to ensure a smooth and immersive gaming experience without flickering, tearing or stuttering.

With exceptional picture quality, low input lag and an ultra-fast response time, LG OLED TVs have already earned a reputation for delivering an optimized gaming performance. The addition of NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility raises the bar once more, guaranteeing even more immersive big-screen PC gaming on the company's industry-leading 4K OLED models, available in 55- to 77-inch screen sizes.
LG's self-emissive OLED technology takes users deeper into the pulsating action of their favorite games, employing the precision of individual pixel control to produce incredibly realistic images. Along with infinite contrast and highly accurate color reproduction, the TVs offer an ultra-fast response time with a refresh rate of up to 120Hz. Input lag - which can make the difference between victory and defeat - is barely perceptible at a 6 milliseconds range for 1440p content at 120 Hz and 13 milliseconds range for 4K content at 60 Hz. The minimal input lag of LG's OLED TVs, of less than a frame, with no loss in picture quality, makes them the best displays for gaming.

What's more, LG's latest OLED TV models support a variety of popular HDR formats that further elevate the gaming experience. Users can play compatible titles in dynamic HDR10 or Dolby Vision (at up to 120 frames per second for Full HD content) taking advantage of HDMI 2.1 specifications such as auto low latency mode (ALLM), enhanced audio return channel (eARC), and variable refresh rate (VRR).

To heighten viewers' sense of immersion when playing games or watching fast content, LG's 2019 OLED TVs support cinematic audio formats including Dolby Atmos and groundbreaking Dolby TrueHD lossless sound technology. With the best premium audio and video format options covered, users can hear and see content as originally intended by its creators. These models also incorporate LG's deep learning-based AI sound for captivating virtual 5.1 surround.

"It's no secret LG OLED TVs are coveted by gamers world over and we are committed to optimizing the OLED gaming experience for them," Sam Kim, senior vice president of the TV product planning division of Home Entertainment company at LG. "With NVIDIA G-SYNC adoption, we are showing that OLED TVs have the support and backing of the world's top gaming hardware brand to make their products look their best."

"We are excited to bring G-SYNC Compatible support to LG's 2019 OLED TVs and HDMI Variable Refresh Rate support to our GeForce RTX 20-Series GPUs," said Matt Wuebbling, head of GeForce marketing at NVIDIA. "Gamers will be blown away by the responsiveness and the lifelike visuals on these TVs when playing the latest PC games featuring real-time ray-tracing powered by GeForce."

NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible support for LG's 2019 OLED TVs will become available in select markets via a firmware upgrade in the weeks to follow.
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41 Comments on LG Unveils First OLED TVs with NVIDIA G-SYNC Support

#26
Aerpoweron
I totally forgot, how about burn in issues for these TVs?

Wasn't there an Australian lawsuit against LG (they lost) because they didn't inform the customer properly about this issue and that it is not covered by warranty?

And can the FPGA unit mine coins when i don't play games and use G-sync?
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#27
Krzych
Great news. VRR adaptation has been really slow on TV market and it is great to see a major manufacturer actually taking effort to make it work properly. And despite all the reasonless hate having a certification like G-sync Compatible that actually guarantees some standards instead of being slapped on everything regardless of whether it works or not like it is the case with FreeSync is a good thing also, everyone with at least some experience with various Adaptive Sync enabled desktop displays knows that. Not to say that there are no good Adaptive Sync implementations, but they are all over the place.

Not really going to make me switch from an ultrawide monitor to a TV for games, even despite vast imagine quality advantage these OLEDs have, I will still use OLED TV for movies only, but options are always good and there are certainly many people for who this announcement is a game changer.
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#28
Valantar
fynxer, post: 4114093, member: 103789"
See this as a cold run and testing for the upcoming G-Sync compatible invasion by nVidia.

nVidia aims to push down FreeSync as much as possible with a massive G-Sync Compatible push the coming years.
This has already started. Haven't you seen the monitor announcements from before IFA? Barely a mention of FreeSync or Adaptive Sync, but a surprising amount of "G-sync compatible" launches.

Have to wonder just how much Nvidia is incentivising this. Free certifications? Marketing support? Also, judging by the press releases and spec sheets presented it might seem like something is preventing manufacturers from mentioning competing brandings/VRR solutions alongside GS Compatible (after all any GS compatible DP display is by definition FreeSync and VESA AS compatible) - I wonder what the terms of that program are like.
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#29
chodaboy19
I have both C9 and RTX2080Ti, I cannot be bothered to move the PC to the living room. :D
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#30
Krzych
Aerpoweron, post: 4114129, member: 140366"
Wasn't there an Australian lawsuit against LG (they lost) because they didn't inform the customer properly about this issue and that it is not covered by warranty?
You can read about it on the web. It was about misinforming the customers about their rights, two customers to be precise. LG there acted like if their warranty was the ultimate law and consumer guarantee rights didn't exist, for which they were fined $160k. This kind of behavior is not uncommon by big companies and shops who think they can make their own law, especially if the law is weak and allows for poor warranties, restocking fees upon returns and other anti-customer practices. I don't know the law in Australia or LG's policy there, but since these were only two customers I guess this was more of a local issue, some bad employees handling the RMA wrong or something like that.

Though I heard that the warranty on TVs can be really bad depending on what the law in the region allows, apparently there are places where they can just say that burn-in is normal and not covered by warranty and it is perfectly legal.
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#31
londiste
Valantar, post: 4114183, member: 171585"
This has already started. Haven't you seen the monitor announcements from before IFA? Barely a mention of FreeSync or Adaptive Sync, but a surprising amount of "G-sync compatible" launches.
Have to wonder just how much Nvidia is incentivising this. Free certifications? Marketing support?
GSync Compatible has specific requirements that are useful for gaming and show quality of the solution to some degree. DP Adaptive-Sync only shows that the feature exists and Freesync mirrors that. Even if Nvidia is not incentivising in any substantial way there is value in this.
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#32
Mistral
Got to admit, nVidia wedging their branding everywhere is getting more and more tiresome. At least Samsung hasn't folded... yet...
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#33
chodaboy19
Mistral, post: 4114207, member: 49446"
Got to admit, nVidia wedging their branding everywhere is getting more and more tiresome. At least Samsung hasn't folded... yet...
It's only a matter of time...
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#34
efikkan
Aerpoweron, post: 4114129, member: 140366"
I totally forgot, how about burn in issues for these TVs?
Since the misconception about "burn-in" comes up in every OLED related thread, I will just quote my previous post on the matter:
efikkan, post: 4100980, member: 150226"
Actual burn-in is something that happened with the CRT technology if the phosphorus were statically exposed too long. OLED and plasma technologies don't have actual burn-in, but they have a problem people commonly confuse with burn-in; uneven wear. The distinction between this and burn-in is very important, both to judge if it is a problem for your use case, and to prevent issues for those who end up buying these screens.

All current OLED displays suffer from this problem, ranging from mobile devices, to laptops and televisions. The problem is causes by some pixels being more worn than others, caused by a usage pattern where certain portions of the screen is on average significantly lighter than the others. It has nothing with pictures being static or not, but whether your usage pattern is uneven enough. You can use your phone or television all day and have no static pictures over time, but if your usage patterns continue to be uneven, it will cause what people mistakenly call "burn-in" to gradually get worse. And the other way; if your average brightness is fairly stable, you can have completely static pictures for hours every day without any problem, because it has nothing to do with them being static or not, so let's end that myth right now.

The good news is that OLED is more robust to wear when the brightness is not very high compared to plasma, which means you can have things like GUI elements on your gaming screen all day, and as long as they are not much brighter than the screen average, you will have no problems with "burned-in" patterns. Bright static or moving patterns should concern you, but not because they are static or not, but because they are brighter than the rest of the screen over time.

So would I personally buy a OLED monitor/TV? Well it depends on how I would use the screen. I wouldn't buy one for kids to use without supervision, and I wouldn't go with OLED for a screen that displays TV-content all day, and I wouldn't go for OLED for a monitor displaying bright web pages all day either. But for a living room "TV" setup for movies and gaming I would certainly go for the superior picture quality of OLED. A well "cared for" OLED (or plasma) will of course have minor imperfections in the panels after several years of usage, but not even close to what every LCD panel already have from the factory, so I wouldn't worry if the usage is right.

When it comes to "protective" mechanisms in televisions, these are pretty much the same for OLED as for plasma; pixel shifting and some dimming for very bright screens over time. These may help with sharp uneven wear for edges of patterns, but not for the overall "problem".
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#35
Metroid
"1440p @ 120 Hz : 6.9 ms " maximum 120hz you can go with it. Good thing is that, it has hdmi 2.1 and support vrr but what is the point of hdmi 2.1 if 4k cant go to 120hz? So move along nothing to see here, perhaps next year lg oled tv 55e9 will be 4k 120hz then it will be a good buy.

efikkan, post: 4114219, member: 150226"
Since the misconception about "burn-in" comes up in every OLED related thread, I will just quote my previous post on the matter:
So basically, oled tvs are only for a time if you use too much. I use my monitor at least 18 hours per day, in my case oledtv is maximum 2 years or so. I think is good even if is only 2 years of use that I will have although price needs to be cheaper to buy a new one or simpler, change the panel.
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#36
Krzych
Mistral, post: 4114207, member: 49446"
Got to admit, nVidia wedging their branding everywhere is getting more and more tiresome. At least Samsung hasn't folded... yet...
This is not "nVidia wedging their branding everywhere", these are various display manufacturers partnering with market leading GPU manufacturer to their own benefit, why else would they do that...

Also it is not some empty branding, it is a certification that guarantees a certain standard to the customer. And for products from manufacturers like LG or Samsung, who's VRR/Adaptive Sync implementations so far were terrible 9 out of 10 times, with ridiculously narrow ranges and tons of flicker, this is especially useful, and especially for TVs that typically don't even mention essential things in their official specification. I don't really see a valid reason to complain here, unless you have some irrational averse to NVIDIA or any other manufacturer.
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#37
medi01
btarunr, post: 4113777, member: 43587"
validated through NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibl
Thanks for misleading customers btarunr.
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#38
goodeedidid
Nah thanks, I still don't want to sell my family to slave merchants.
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#39
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Nvidia payed LG a tonne of money... Because it would of made more sense if these were 'FREESYNC' panels/TVs given the fact that AMD pretty much has the console market nailed...

I wonder if LG approached AMD first about the marketing strategy but they turned it down so LG turned to Nvidia who just happened to be sitting in the same office at the time?

I wouldnt say sales would of been through the roof for Freesync TVs but It would of definitely added to the appeal if any at all.
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#40
Fluffmeister
Freesync is an AMD trademark, ironic really.
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#41
Vayra86
Screw Gsync. Give me panels smaller than that 55 inch and we can talk. 1080p/1440p and 24~32 inch... we want YOU
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