Tuesday, September 10th 2019

LG Unveils First OLED TVs with NVIDIA G-SYNC Support

LG Electronics (LG) has joined forces with NVIDIA to make gamers' dreams come true, adding support for NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility to its stunning 2019 OLED TVs (model 65/55E9, model 77/65/55C9). LG's newest OLED products offer blazing speed and stunning color reproduction, their superior performance and image quality validated through NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible testing to ensure a smooth and immersive gaming experience without flickering, tearing or stuttering.

With exceptional picture quality, low input lag and an ultra-fast response time, LG OLED TVs have already earned a reputation for delivering an optimized gaming performance. The addition of NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility raises the bar once more, guaranteeing even more immersive big-screen PC gaming on the company's industry-leading 4K OLED models, available in 55- to 77-inch screen sizes.
LG's self-emissive OLED technology takes users deeper into the pulsating action of their favorite games, employing the precision of individual pixel control to produce incredibly realistic images. Along with infinite contrast and highly accurate color reproduction, the TVs offer an ultra-fast response time with a refresh rate of up to 120Hz. Input lag - which can make the difference between victory and defeat - is barely perceptible at a 6 milliseconds range for 1440p content at 120 Hz and 13 milliseconds range for 4K content at 60 Hz. The minimal input lag of LG's OLED TVs, of less than a frame, with no loss in picture quality, makes them the best displays for gaming.

What's more, LG's latest OLED TV models support a variety of popular HDR formats that further elevate the gaming experience. Users can play compatible titles in dynamic HDR10 or Dolby Vision (at up to 120 frames per second for Full HD content) taking advantage of HDMI 2.1 specifications such as auto low latency mode (ALLM), enhanced audio return channel (eARC), and variable refresh rate (VRR).

To heighten viewers' sense of immersion when playing games or watching fast content, LG's 2019 OLED TVs support cinematic audio formats including Dolby Atmos and groundbreaking Dolby TrueHD lossless sound technology. With the best premium audio and video format options covered, users can hear and see content as originally intended by its creators. These models also incorporate LG's deep learning-based AI sound for captivating virtual 5.1 surround.

"It's no secret LG OLED TVs are coveted by gamers world over and we are committed to optimizing the OLED gaming experience for them," Sam Kim, senior vice president of the TV product planning division of Home Entertainment company at LG. "With NVIDIA G-SYNC adoption, we are showing that OLED TVs have the support and backing of the world's top gaming hardware brand to make their products look their best."

"We are excited to bring G-SYNC Compatible support to LG's 2019 OLED TVs and HDMI Variable Refresh Rate support to our GeForce RTX 20-Series GPUs," said Matt Wuebbling, head of GeForce marketing at NVIDIA. "Gamers will be blown away by the responsiveness and the lifelike visuals on these TVs when playing the latest PC games featuring real-time ray-tracing powered by GeForce."

NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible support for LG's 2019 OLED TVs will become available in select markets via a firmware upgrade in the weeks to follow.
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41 Comments on LG Unveils First OLED TVs with NVIDIA G-SYNC Support

#1
Chomiq
LG's so full of it. Another "NVIDIA G-Sync" product that's actually G-Sync Compatible. Beside, without HDMI 2.1 on GPU side this is useless, not to mention the ability to drive games at 4K120. This is basically their x9 series with a "NVIDIA G-SYNC" sticker on the box.
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#2
ZoneDymo
Chomiq, post: 4113779, member: 185703"
LG's so full of it. Another "NVIDIA G-Sync" product that's actually G-Sync Compatible. Beside, without HDMI 2.1 on GPU side this is useless, not to mention the ability to drive games at 4K120. This is basically their x9 series with a "NVIDIA G-SYNC" sticker on the box.
Was just going to ask that, this does not contain a G-sync module...
This is just a Freesync/Adaptive sync monitor that Nvidia (finally) made work for their cards.

Its pretty amazing companies are willing to throw such a shroud over this entire thing making it look like Nvidia G-sync was a great idea instead of AMD's approach....
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#3
Chomiq
ZoneDymo, post: 4113783, member: 66089"
Was just going to ask that, this does not contain a G-sync module...
This is just a Freesync/Adaptive sync monitor that Nvidia (finally) made work for their cards.

Its pretty amazing companies are willing to throw such a shroud over this entire thing making it look like Nvidia G-sync was a great idea instead of AMD's approach....
That's LG's marketing tactic - look at their previous press release about new monitors. "NVIDIA G-Sync" logo on the screen, "NVIDIA G-Sync" in the headline, but once you read the press release you'll notice that it's a "G-Sync compatible" display.
https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/lg-announces-ultragear-ips-1-ms-lineup-with-nvidia-g-sync.258956/
"G-Sync Compatible" doesn't come up until third paragraph in.

It's not even about FreeSync vs G-Sync, in true the display uses AdaptiveSync, a VESA standard. They should just stick to VESA for branding and mention compatibility with FreeSync/G-Sync in specs. But hey, I guess "NVIDIA G-Sync" drives sales better than AdaptiveSync.
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#4
The Quim Reaper
Well seeing as you need to run through a Display Port connection to get Gysnc compatibility on Freesync PC monitors, this has to have involved more than just sticking a 'compatible with G-Sync' label on them, to get it running through HDMI 2.1, No?
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#5
Chomiq
The Quim Reaper, post: 4113788, member: 116062"
Well seeing as you need to run through a Display Port connection to get Gysnc compatibility on Freesync PC monitors, this has to have involved more than just sticking a 'compatible with G-Sync' label on them, to get it running through HDMI 2.1, No?
That's the thing, there's no DP and this "G-Sync Compatibility" comes as a firmware update. Unless NVIDIA has magically allowed G-Sync to work on HDMI.
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#6
potato580+
this is might good for casual gaming, probably good for gaming console, an tv cant outrun monitor, especiialy if you were abt play competitive games(:
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#7
gdallsk
wait a second, this thing doesn't have DisplayPorts, does this mean Gsync now works on HDMI as well?
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#8
looniam
Chomiq, post: 4113792, member: 185703"
That's the thing, there's no DP and this "G-Sync Compatibility" comes as a firmware update. Unless NVIDIA has magically allowed G-Sync to work on HDMI.
https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/news/lg-gsync-compatible-hdmi-big-screen-gaming/
LG E9 and C9 models, ranging in size from 55 to 75-inches, will receive G-SYNC Compatible firmware updates later this year. Simultaneously, we’ll release a new GeForce Game Ready Driver, enabling GeForce RTX and GeForce GTX 16-Series gamers to connect their PCs via HDMI to validated G-SYNC Compatible LG TVs.
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#9
The Quim Reaper
gdallsk, post: 4113812, member: 104979"
wait a second, this thing doesn't have DisplayPorts, does this mean Gsync now works on HDMI as well?
..Only if you shell out the coin for an LG OLED, otherwise business as usual for PC monitors, DP only.

There will be an Nvidia driver released later this year that will detect if your PC is hooked up to an LG OLED and enable it through the HDMI 2.1 connection.
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#10
gdallsk
The Quim Reaper, post: 4113814, member: 116062"
..Only if you shell out the coin for an LG OLED, otherwise business as usual for PC monitors, DP only.

There will be an Nvidia driver released later this year that will detect if your PC is hooked up to an LG OLED and enable it through the HDMI 2.1 connection.
its only a matter of time before it starts appearing on other screens
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#11
specopsFI
It's not even just about HDMI. The LGs only support the HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate, for which there has been no source devices so far short of the XBox One X. This is Nvidia taking initiative in supporting a new open(ish) VRR standard which will be in most displays in the coming years.

This is actually big news, to me at least. The missing piece of information is whether Nvidia is actually capable of getting 4k@120Hz out of their Turing cards. That would be another quite an accomplishment. They are introducing an HDMI 2.1 feature here, so fingers crossed. But that may be pushing it. If Turing was actually HDMI 2.1 capable, I'm sure they would have had that as a bullet point from launch.
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#12
londiste
What's the VRR range? So far, it seems to be 40-120Hz which might be a problem for HDMI 2.0 than can only do 60Hz at 2160p.
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#13
Chomiq
londiste, post: 4113821, member: 169790"
What's the VRR range? So far, it seems to be 40-120Hz which might be a problem for HDMI 2.0 than can only do 60Hz at 2160p.
VRR range for E9 is 40-120.
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#14
Vya Domus
Chomiq, post: 4113786, member: 185703"
It's not even about FreeSync vs G-Sync, in true the display uses AdaptiveSync, a VESA standard. They should just stick to VESA for branding and mention compatibility with FreeSync/G-Sync in specs. But hey, I guess "NVIDIA G-Sync" drives sales better than AdaptiveSync.
The purpose of "G-sync compatible"was to make the Freesync branding disappear from the marketing material of monitors/TV. And it worked it seems.
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#15
londiste
Vya Domus, post: 4113886, member: 169281"
The purpose of "G-sync compatible"was to make the Freesync branding disappear from the marketing material of monitors/TV. And it worked it seems.
With DP, Freesync had an accurate name and uses a standard technical solution. When it comes to HDMI Freesync is as much branding as GSync.

Things really are going towards the right track these days, DP with Adaptive-Sync and HDMI 2.1 with VRR are standard solutions and we can expect both AMD and Nvidia as well as Intel to support these. How the branding will work, does not really matter.

Edit:
By the way, as far as I know, LG-s 9-series OLED TVs do not work with Freesync (yet). Technical details of the implementation are said to be different between HDMI 2.1 VRR and Freesync.
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#16
Vya Domus
londiste, post: 4113889, member: 169790"
How the branding will work, does not really matter.
Sure it does, having Nvidia plastered all over every monitor/TV will have it's effects.
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#17
londiste
Vya Domus, post: 4113891, member: 169281"
Sure it does, having Nvidia plastered all over every monitor/TV will have it's effects.
I would prefer neither branding would be there. Only DP Adaptive-Sync as a feature would be cool but that is unfortunately not in the cards. I am really hoping for TVs to get HDMI 2.1 VRR and eschew any further branding. Too optimistic, probably, but one can hope :)

Standardization committees getting their shit together would have to be part of a good solution as well. DP Adaptive Sync and Freesync are plastered over everything even when the feature works like crap. I am afraid HDMI 2.1 VRR will follow the same pattern. GSync Compatible and Freesync 2 will probably have their place to distinguish good implementations.
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#18
Turmania
How many Benjamins do we need to say bye too for this beauty?
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#19
Mad_foxx1983
Chomiq, post: 4113792, member: 185703"
That's the thing, there's no DP and this "G-Sync Compatibility" comes as a firmware update. Unless NVIDIA has magically allowed G-Sync to work on HDMI.
All "G-sync compatibility" is using vesas adaptive sync technology which can be used over displayport 1.2 and hdmia 2.0 and up. AMD supports both hdmi and displayport. Nvidia can allow it over hdmi but for pc's they only allow over displayport. but for them to compete in the tv market they have no choice but to allow it over hdmi now cuz amd freesync is supported on the flagship samsung tvs now.
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#20
londiste
Mad_foxx1983, post: 4113905, member: 184415"
All "G-sync compatibility" is using vesas adaptive sync technology which can be used over displayport 1.2 and hdmia 2.0 and up. AMD supports both hdmi and displayport. Nvidia can allow it over hdmi but for pc's they only allow over displayport. but for them to compete in the tv market they have no choice but to allow it over hdmi now cuz amd freesync is supported on the flagship samsung tvs now.
Displayport has Adaptive-Sync as optional feature in 1.2a and newer.
HDMI 2.1 has VRR, HDMI 2.0 does not.
Freesync over HDMI is based on DP Adaptive-Sync but is a proprietary feature.
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#21
Mad_foxx1983
londiste, post: 4113906, member: 169790"
Displayport has Adaptive-Sync as optional feature in 1.2a and newer.
HDMI 2.1 has VRR, HDMI 2.0 does not.
Freesync over HDMI is based on DP Adaptive-Sync but is a proprietary feature.
you right. so nvidia is using hdmi forums vrr tech. interesting.
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#22
yakk
Is there a plain adaptive sync SKU of this TV with no extra branding to pay for?
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#23
londiste
yakk, post: 4113932, member: 158293"
Is there a plain adaptive sync SKU of this TV with no extra branding to pay for?
SKUs and prices will not change due to branding. These models have had VRR from the beginning. The only problem is that the only signal source capable of sending signal with VRR were Xbox One models. Now, Nvidia Turing cards will be able to utilize that VRR as well. I assume AMD will follow with Freesync (2).
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#24
Aerpoweron
I have just checked on the LG website for tech specs. 55e9 and 55c9. Both only have 4 hdmi 2.1 connectors. No Display port. But keep in mind Freesync 2 is working over HDMI as far as i know. So shouldn't G-Sync work over it as well? At least the Vesa Standard one?
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#25
fynxer
Next gen nVidia cards will have HDMI 2.1 and G-Sync will use HDMI 2.1 on both monitors and TV (LCD/OLED) and also DisplayPort where needed.

See this as a cold run and testing for the upcoming G-Sync compatible invasion by nVidia.

nVidia aims to push down FreeSync as much as possible with a massive G-Sync Compatible push the coming years.

The normal G-Sync module with DP 1.2 and 8-bit color will live on for a while as long as manufacturers want it and then put out to pasture without being replaced with new hardware.

The new normal will then be G-Sync Compatible and for so called medium upper class and high end G-Sync Ultra will be used.

By the way, nVidia is actually working on a custom chip for fan less version of G-Sync Ultra module BUT it is still up to two years away before it appears in products, they want to get away from the expensive and hot Intel's FPGA unit - Altera Arria 10 GX 480
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