Tuesday, September 17th 2019

Wi-Fi Alliance Officially Launches the Wi-Fi Certified 6 Program

The Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 certification program from Wi-Fi Alliance is now available and delivers the best user experience with devices based on IEEE 802.11ax. The certification program brings new features and capabilities that enable substantially greater overall Wi-Fi network performance in challenging environments with many connected devices such as stadiums, airports, and industrial parks. With adoption of the latest Wi-Fi generation increasing, product vendors and service providers can trust Wi-Fi CERTIFIED will distinguish Wi-Fi 6 products and networks that meet the highest standards for security and interoperability. Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 provides significant capacity, performance, and latency improvements to the entire Wi-Fi ecosystem, while ensuring products across vendors to work well together to deliver greater innovation and opportunity.

Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 supports a more diverse set of devices and applications, from those requiring peak performance in demanding enterprise environments to those requiring low power and low latency in smart homes or industrial IoT scenarios. Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 delivers nearly four times the capacity of Wi-Fi 5, and is an evolutionary advancement for Wi-Fi's ability to deliver high-performance infrastructure and optimized connectivity to all devices on a network simultaneously - bringing noticeable improvements in densely connected Wi-Fi environments. Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 delivers critical connectivity that supports cellular networks, and leverages high speeds, low latency, power efficiency, greater capacity, and enhanced coverage to deliver many advanced 5G services.
"Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 is ushering in a new era of Wi-Fi, building on Wi-Fi's core characteristics to provide better performance in every environment for users, greater network capacity for service providers to improve coverage for their customers, and new opportunities for advanced applications," said Edgar Figueroa, president and CEO, Wi-Fi Alliance. "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 will deliver improvements in connectivity, including in high density locations and IoT environments."
Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 delivers advanced security protocols and requires the latest generation of Wi-Fi security, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED WPA3. Advanced capabilities available in Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 include:
  • Orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA): effectively shares channels to increase network efficiency and lower latency for both uplink and downlink traffic in high demand environments
  • Multi-user multiple input multiple output (MU-MIMO): allows more downlink data to be transferred at once and enables an access point to transmit data to a larger number of devices concurrently
  • 160 MHz channels: increases bandwidth to deliver greater performance with low latency
  • Target wake time (TWT): significantly improves battery life in Wi-Fi devices, such as Internet of Things (IoT) devices
  • 1024 quadrature amplitude modulation mode (1024-QAM): increases throughput in Wi-Fi devices by encoding more data in the same amount of spectrum
  • Transmit beamforming: enables higher data rates at a given range resulting in greater network capacity
"Wi-Fi 6 brings greater speeds and more efficiency to Wi-Fi networks, expanding its role as a critical communication platform," said Phil Solis, research director at IDC. "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 drives a higher quality experience for all Wi-Fi's many use cases, further propelling the Wi-Fi market and ensuring Wi-Fi maintains its strong position as the connectivity landscape evolves."

Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 expands on Wi-Fi's core strengths including affordable performance, efficient operation, commitment to security, ease of use, self-deployment, and long-term compatibility, while also supporting a more reliable user experience in areas of high user demand. Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 leverages Wi-Fi's global ubiquity to more efficiently connect users in more environments, support growing data requirements, and expand advanced use cases including augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), streaming high-definition content, real-time monitoring, and mission critical applications. As more spectrum is made available for Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 will only continue to drive greater global Wi-Fi innovation and economic contributions.

The Samsung Galaxy Note10 is the first Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 smartphone, and Wi-Fi Alliance expects most leading phones and access points will soon support the latest generation of Wi-Fi. The first products designated Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 which comprise the test bed for certification include:
  • Broadcom BCM4375
  • Broadcom BCM43698
  • Broadcom BCM43684
  • Cypress CYW 89650 Auto-Grade Wi-Fi 6 Certified
  • Intel Wi-Fi 6 (Gig+) AX200 (for PCs)
  • Intel Home Wi-Fi Chipset WAV600 Series (for routers and gateways)
  • Marvell 88W9064 (4x4) Wi-Fi 6 Dual-Band STA
  • Marvell 88W9064 (4x4) + 88W9068 (8x8) Wi-Fi 6 Concurrent Dual-Band AP
  • Qualcomm Networking Pro 1200 Platform
  • Qualcomm FastConnect 6800 Wi-Fi 6 Mobile Connectivity Subsystem
  • Ruckus R750 Wi-Fi 6 Access Point
For more information on Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 please visit this page.
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10 Comments on Wi-Fi Alliance Officially Launches the Wi-Fi Certified 6 Program

#1
TheUn4seen
"So, let's extort some money from manufacturers wanting to put "WiFi6 OMG!!!11" stickers on the box." Very corporate of them, they even fit in the requisite "greater innovation and opportunity" moniker no corposheep can live without.
;)
Posted on Reply
#2
somethinggeneric
TheUn4seen
"So, let's extort some money from manufacturers wanting to put "WiFi6 OMG!!!11" stickers on the box." Very corporate of them, they even fit in the requisite "greater innovation and opportunity" moniker no corposheep can live without.
;)
The reason these devices are required to be "certified" is so that when you buy a router with "WIFI 6" on it, it can perform as expected.
Posted on Reply
#3
Octavean
If this helps move things along so we finally see more WiFi6 / IEEE 802.11AX devices then so bit. There just isn't enough choice out there. I've wanted to buy a new router for some time now and I would prefer one from Synology. So chop, chop!!!
Posted on Reply
#4
TheLostSwede
somethinggeneric
The reason these devices are required to be "certified" is so that when you buy a router with "WIFI 6" on it, it can perform as expected.
Not just perform, but also for interoperability. However, so far, the WiFi Alliance had done a fairly poor job of that, with too many features not requiring interoperability testing. A bare minimum feature set isn't good enough imho.

Octavean
If this helps move things along so we finally see more WiFi6 / IEEE 802.11AX devices then so bit. There just isn't enough choice out there. I've wanted to buy a new router for some time now and I would prefer one from Synology. So chop, chop!!!
Plenty choice, but what sane person acts to pay $500+ for a router?
Posted on Reply
#5
TheUn4seen
somethinggeneric
The reason these devices are required to be "certified" is so that when you buy a router with "WIFI 6" on it, it can perform as expected.
The problem here is that's not really the case with WiFi. A lot of features are not really interoperable, not to mention loads of proprietary crap manufacturers usually put on top. And, since the certification process seems to look like "give us monies, put the sticker on it", my sarcasm seems well founded.
Posted on Reply
#6
Makaveli
TheLostSwede
Not just perform, but also for interoperability. However, so far, the WiFi Alliance had done a fairly poor job of that, with too many features not requiring interoperability testing. A bare minimum feature set isn't good enough imho.


Plenty choice, but what sane person acts to pay $500+ for a router?
I just bought a Asus AX88U for $363 CAD at bestbuy on Sept 8 there is no need to spend $500.

The wireless chipset in it Broadcom BCM43684

Which means its Wifi 6 ready, Asus already had a Beta firmware out that enables
- Beta OFDMA support
- Beta WPA3 support

And that was released on August 1st.
Posted on Reply
#7
yakk
Octavean
If this helps move things along so we finally see more WiFi6 / IEEE 802.11AX devices then so bit. There just isn't enough choice out there. I've wanted to buy a new router for some time now and I would prefer one from Synology. So chop, chop!!!
Same here, the 2600ac Synology router is the best I've worked with on the consumer side. If they can come out with an 8 port WiFi 6 router I'm first in line, cost be damned.
Posted on Reply
#8
BorgOvermind
TheUn4seen
"So, let's extort some money from manufacturers wanting to put "WiFi6 OMG!!!11" stickers on the box." Very corporate of them, they even fit in the requisite "greater innovation and opportunity" moniker no corposheep can live without.
;)
What would you expect ?
They were running out of nice sounding letters after the 802.11 tag.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheLostSwede
Makaveli
I just bought a Asus AX88U for $363 CAD at bestbuy on Sept 8 there is no need to spend $500.

The wireless chipset in it Broadcom BCM43684

Which means its Wifi 6 ready, Asus already had a Beta firmware out that enables
- Beta OFDMA support
- Beta WPA3 support

And that was released on August 1st.
Still crazy money to pay to be a beta tester...
Posted on Reply
#10
Makaveli
TheLostSwede
Still crazy money to pay to be a beta tester...
Who is beta testing?

I upgraded from 68U class hardware because I upgraded from a 500/20 cable connection to 1Gbps/750 Mbps Fiber connection. And my previous router was not keeping up when I was taxing the new connection. I also use a VPN which was also another big factor.

So dual core 256mb Router to Quad core with 1 GB of ram and logic for AES encryption on the new router. The AX stuff is just a nice to have at this point. The majority of my devices are wired and I only use wireless for secondary equipment laptops and phones.

And $363 Dollars maybe crazy money for you but its fine with my budget.
Posted on Reply