Sunday, October 27th 2019

Intel "Tiger Lake-U" Processors Could Support LPDDR5 Memory

Intel's Core "Tiger Lake" microarchitecture could be a point of transition between DDR4 and DDR5 for the company. Prototypes of devices based on the ultra-compact "Tiger Lake-Y" SoC were earlier shown featuring LPDDR4X memory, although a new device, possibly a prototyping platform, in the regulatory queue with the Eurasian Economic Commission describes itself as featuring a "Tiger Lake-U" chip meant for thin and light notebooks and convertibles. This device features newer LPDDR5 memory, according to its regulatory filing.

LPDDR5 succeeds LPDDR4X as the industry's next low-power memory standard, offering data-rates of up to 6,400 MT/s (versus up to 4,266 MT/s of LPDDR4X), and consumes up to 30 percent less power. This prototype at the EEC is sure to be using unreleased LPDDR5 memory chips as DRAM majors Samsung and SK Hynix plan to ship their DDR5-based memory solutions only by the end of this year, although mass-production of the chips have already started at Samsung, in PoP form-factors. A successor to the 10th generation Core "Ice Lake," "Tiger Lake" will be Intel's second CPU microarchitecture designed for its 10 nm silicon fabrication node.
Sources: KOMACHI_Ensaka (Twitter), Eurasian Economic Commission, Tom's Hardware
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13 Comments on Intel "Tiger Lake-U" Processors Could Support LPDDR5 Memory

#1
lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
Posted on Reply
#2
ZoneDymo
lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
considering this is for that vaporware 10nm of Intel it seems its still later though
Posted on Reply
#3
londiste
lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
Pretty sure move to DDR5 is going to happen the same way as previous moves - better bandwidth but worse latency at first.
Posted on Reply
#4
voltage
lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
sooner rather than later??? wt... it IS later, later is Now. DDR5 was suppose to be released two years ago.

did you just now get into pc's ?
Posted on Reply
#5
lynx29
voltage
sooner rather than later??? wt... it IS later, later is Now. DDR5 was suppose to be released two years ago.

did you just now get into pc's ?
lol welcome to my ignore list.
Posted on Reply
#6
yeeeeman
voltage
sooner rather than later??? wt... it IS later, later is Now. DDR5 was suppose to be released two years ago.

did you just now get into pc's ?
Given DDR4 is not really a bottleneck for current CPUs, I don't see any problem sticking with DDR4 as long as possible.
As for lower power, you always need something that is lower power. Qualcomm will also support lpddr5 on its sd865 next year. So this is the time.
Posted on Reply
#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
voltage
sooner rather than later??? wt... it IS later, later is Now. DDR5 was suppose to be released two years ago.

did you just now get into pc's ?
JEDEC hasn't even finalized the spec for DDR5 yet. It's hard to produce a product when the spec isn't complete.
Posted on Reply
#8
lynx29
Aquinus
JEDEC hasn't even finalized the spec for DDR5 yet. It's hard to produce a product when the spec isn't complete.
Doesn't the first post already show it in mass production over at samsung?
Posted on Reply
#9
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
lynx29
Doesn't the first post already show it in mass production over at samsung?
I wouldn't be surprised if they made some assumptions about what's going to change and what's not compared to what the draft for DDR5 already says.
Posted on Reply
#10
londiste
Spec is close to final and both Samsung and Hynix have said they intend to have DDR5 modules ready/out at the end of this year. I would say it won't happen quite this year but largely because there are no of CPUs or memory controllers that would be able to utilize DDR5.
Posted on Reply
#11
cygnus_1
lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
And yet I still don't own a single system with DDR4 in it, all still DDR3

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

edit: unless you count the GDDR5 on my GTX 1070. But I don't count that.
Posted on Reply
#12
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
cygnus_1
And yet I still don't own a single system with DDR4 in it, all still DDR3
That's what happens when people like you and I hold on to a platform for 7 or 8 years. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#13
notb
ZoneDymo
considering this is for that vaporware 10nm of Intel it seems its still later though
?
You can buy a 10th ultrabook pretty easily by now (it may be easier than getting a Ryzen 3900X).
The choice isn't large at the moment, but by the end of November Ice Lake will be offered in mainstream laptops.
I was told that Dell Inspiron 3593 (i7-1065G7, starting at ~$600) should be available on 2019-11-08 (in Europe).

lynx29
I had a feeling DDR5 would happen sooner rather than later, nice. I wonder how much faster it will be compared to 3200 cas 14 b-die ram
It's just LPDDR5 for now. Low power consumption will be prioritized, so we shouldn't extrapolate any results that show up.
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