Thursday, December 26th 2019

Intel DG1 Discrete GPU Shows Up with 96 Execution Units

As we are approaching the year 2020, when Intel is rumored to launch its discrete graphics cards to the hand of consumers around the world, we are gearing up on the number of leaks about the upcoming products. Thanks to Twitter user @KOMACHI_ENSAKA, who found the latest EEC listing, we have new information regarding Intel's upcoming DG1 discrete graphics solution.

In the leaked EEC listing, the DG1 GPU is being presented as a GPU with 96 execution units, meaning that Intel is planning to take on entry-level graphics cards with this GPU. If the graphics unit is following the same design principle of the previous-generation GPUs, then there should be around 8 shading units per one execution unit, totaling 768 shading units for the whole DG1 GPU. If the 12th Gen Xe design inside the DG1 follows a different approach, then we can expect to see a double amount of shading units, meaning 1536 in total.

Here are the listed EEC entries:
  • DG1 External FRD1 96EU Accessory Kit (Alpha) Development Kit (DGD12KEF3A)
  • Discrete Graphics 96EU DG1 8+2 Windows External PROD HOST SDP (Alpha) (DGD12SEH4A)
  • Discrete Graphics 96EU DG1 6+2 Windows External PROD HOST SDP (Alpha) (DGD12SEH3A)
Source: VideoCardz
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21 Comments on Intel DG1 Discrete GPU Shows Up with 96 Execution Units

#1
Aerpoweron
Ok, but we still don't have any idea what we can expect out of these 768 /1536 shading units.

And why is it called DG1 (Discrete Graphics 1?) intel had the i740 some time ago as a discrete GPU.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel740
Posted on Reply
#2
Midland Dog
Aerpoweron
Ok, but we still don't have any idea what we can expect out of these 768 /1536 shading units.

And why is it called DG1 (Discrete Graphics 1?) intel had the i740 some time ago as a discrete GPU.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel740
i740 was a POS dumbster trash failure, DG1 should shake up the entry tier like hell 2-3 tflops expected, we will see if it can deliver 3d performance regardless of compute prowess, as thats all that matters at this price point
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#3
Aerpoweron
I am a little confused now. I've checke the computational power on the AMD and Intel intigrated GPUs. it is in the 1Tflop to 2Tflop range. And that is something you can get now. Then we have the RX 570 / 5500 which have around 5Tflop.
It seems to me that the 2 - 3 Tflop range will get smaller with the next gen of iGPUs beeing released. And you can get a RX 570 for 120$ these days which makes it hard to justify 100$ for an RX 550 or 560 with way less power.
Posted on Reply
#4
dj-electric
I think this is way early to jump so hard into conclusions about what this hardware can or cannot do.

Maybe we should wait a few months, hell, maybe even until we actually get a product before throwing harshly judgmental statements at it?
maybe?
Posted on Reply
#5
Midland Dog
what are discreet graphics 8+2 and 6+2 those are cpu/igp codes, thats the question we need to be asking
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#6
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
I don't see this going anywhere with them...
Posted on Reply
#7
TheGuruStud
Maybe it can beat the old Vega apu with dual channel ram this time
Posted on Reply
#8
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
I’m excited, if they follow through it’s history to be able to hold one, even if it’s terrible it doesn’t matter. You would not be able to shake intels affect on the GPU market if they brought a stand-alone GPU to consumer shelves.
Posted on Reply
#9
E-curbi
Solaris17
I’m excited, if they follow through it’s history to be able to hold one, even if it’s terrible it doesn’t matter. You would not be able to shake intels affect on the GPU market if they brought a stand-alone GPU to consumer shelves.
Would take quite a lot to pull me away from AMD’s outstanding workstation cards, and extremely comprehensive Radeon Pro software.

Still hoping Intel eventually launches a workstation series at least in the mid-range if not the ultra-high end which would be difficult I would think, at least at first.

AMD Radeon Pro also offers an extended 10year warranty (you have to sign up for), which I’ve used once and they sent a brand new WX-4100 all the way from the factory in Asia direct to me via the international shipping port in Miami. Yea, I had to pay $28USD in return shipping the broken card to the AMD Service Center in Canada, but still – it’s a nice service from AMD, to get a brand new card 2.5years into a warranty.

And dat blue color be pretty. :)

Posted on Reply
#10
Midland Dog
E-curbi
Would take quite a lot to pull me away from AMD’s outstanding workstation cards, and extremely comprehensive Radeon Pro software.

Still hoping Intel eventually launches a workstation series at least in the mid-range if not the ultra-high end which would be difficult I would think, at least at first.

AMD Radeon Pro also offers an extended 10year warranty (you have to sign up for), which I’ve used once and they sent a brand new WX-4100 all the way from the factory in Asia direct to me via the international shipping port in Miami. Yea, I had to pay $28USD in return shipping the broken card to the AMD Service Center in Canada, but still – it’s a nice service from AMD, to get a brand new card 2.5years into a warranty.

And dat blue color be pretty. :)


would a cheap consumer card not be a better buy
Posted on Reply
#11
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
E-curbi
Would take quite a lot to pull me away from AMD’s outstanding workstation cards, and extremely comprehensive Radeon Pro software.
weather they get tech geeks to buy one isn’t the point I am making at all.
A third player even if entry level cards would be great competition for Amd and Nvidia. Even if it’s in something like the prebuilt desktop space. It will affect prices somewhere even if it’s not necessarily for a bunch of PC gamers that only buy midrange or higher hardware.

The community that is TPU and it’s niche is such a negligible part of the PC industry.
Posted on Reply
#12
E-curbi
Solaris17
weather they get tech geeks to buy one isn’t the point I am making at all.
A third player even if entry level cards would be great competition for Amd and Nvidia. Even if it’s in something like the prebuilt desktop space. It will affect prices somewhere even if it’s not necessarily for a bunch of PC gamers that only buy midrange or higher hardware.

The community that is TPU and it’s niche is such a negligible part of the PC industry.
Understand completely, you're thinking Intel's market impact and overview for the industry.

I was only throwing in a little personal experience from a consumer's perspective. Both perspectives want Intel to enter into the market, your overview and my ground level single person. lol :)
Posted on Reply
#13
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
E-curbi
Understand completely, you're thinking Intel's market impact and overview for the industry.

I was only throwing in a little personal experience from a consumer's perspective. Both perspectives want Intel to enter into the market, your overview and my ground level single person. lol :)
it is a nice blue
Posted on Reply
#14
E-curbi
Midland Dog
would a cheap consumer card not be a better buy
Yes you are correct. Yet one of my build themes is silicon efficiency leading to inaudibility for a working environment and AMD bins the Radeon Pro Workstation GPU chips so I can tune the onboard fan way down to zero auditory output from like 2inches and any distance farther from your ears, and still maintain super low thermals while working like 28C to 30C all day long in a warm Florida climate.

The mid-range WX-4100 cards are not so expensive, only around $225 to $275 depending on the vendor. But yes you are right, I could purchase the SAME GPU not binned in a gaming package at probably half that price. But then you don't get the way cool Radeon Pro software, which can be tuned to make text docs appear so beautiful and easy on the eyes for long work days. Gotta save those eyes. lol :D
Posted on Reply
#15
Athlonite
Midland Dog
what are discreet graphics 8+2 and 6+2 those are cpu/igp codes, thats the question we need to be asking
Those are numbers for VRM (Voltage Regulation Module) counts... A discrete Graphics card is one that plugs into an PCIe slot on your motherboard it doesn't come built in to the CPU intel type or APU in AMD's case.
A Discrete Graphics card may or may not require an power plug to be plugged in to gain the extra power required to power the GPU usually these come in 6 pin or 8 pin configurations and sometimes multiples of each are required in
1 x 8pin or 2 x 8pin or 1 x 8pin + 1 x 6pin or 2 x 6pin and 1 x 6pin PCIe power plugs all depends on how much extra power the GPU requires over and above the 75W available via the PCIe slot
Posted on Reply
#16
HugsNotDrugs
E-curbi
Yes you are correct. Yet one of my build themes is silicon efficiency leading to inaudibility for a working environment and AMD bins the Radeon Pro Workstation GPU chips so I can tune the onboard fan way down to zero auditory output from like 2inches and any distance farther from your ears, and still maintain super low thermals while working like 28C to 30C all day long in a warm Florida climate.

The mid-range WX-4100 cards are not so expensive, only around $225 to $275 depending on the vendor. But yes you are right, I could purchase the SAME GPU not binned in a gaming package at probably half that price. But then you don't get the way cool Radeon Pro software, which can be tuned to make text docs appear so beautiful and easy on the eyes for long work days. Gotta save those eyes. lol :D
Where do I find more information about the Radeon Pro tuning of text rendering? Is there a name for the specific setting?

Many thanks.
Posted on Reply
#17
DeathtoGnomes
damn typos, its supposed to be D2G1 Discrete...:eek:

OH and I heard these cards could finally be right side up. :respect:
Posted on Reply
#18
Jism
Midland Dog
i740 was a POS dumbster trash failure, DG1 should shake up the entry tier like hell 2-3 tflops expected, we will see if it can deliver 3d performance regardless of compute prowess, as thats all that matters at this price point
Dude,

In a way every IGP that intel delivered was a succes. You know why? It's because back in the days the demands for office computers was so high that once intel started to integrate build in graphics or simply 2D chips onto it's motherboards the demand for external 2d/3d cards was'nt needed anymore. There was a time that steam graphs showed intel constant dominance with integrated graphics. Just saying.

85% of PC's that live in offices do not need extended 3D stuff for excel, word and powerpoint. A simple 2D graphics card is enough.

So in a way 740 was a succes; it's just not providing that graphics punch others did.
Posted on Reply
#19
Mouth of Sauron
Midland Dog
i740 was a POS dumbster trash failure, DG1 should shake up the entry tier like hell 2-3 tflops expected, we will see if it can deliver 3d performance regardless of compute prowess, as thats all that matters at this price point
Sorry, based on what? Intel does have a history of making terrifyingly bad discrete graphic cards, take a moment and look what ELSE existed at that time and how much better it was...

Another point - I doubt (oh, so sincerely) that Intel will act in AMD underdog-takes-killing-blow on... what? 1030? RX550? Both are borderline cannibalized already...

Another point about 'shaking' - both NVIDIA and AMD have like 10 trillions GPU-based patents each... Intel has... a good will? No, it's probably Raja... It's entirely different being the boss in company who produces graphic cards for 50+ years and has all the patents in the world and the same where the only thing you have in abundance is cash.

New IP, made on new patents by a notoriously high-profit company will shake the iGPU or low discrete GPU card world? Seriously?

iGPU and low-end discrete GPU paradigm shifts basically never happened - that segment earn lots of money, majority even, but that's why the price wars are so fierce there. Enter the Wu-Tang and both AMD and NVIDIA will try to get you out first, before you become a threat. And NVIDIA sits on so much cash, and AMD haven't even started taping out really serious APUs...

Current games are optimized to work with NVIDIA (most of them) or AMD and not Intel.

I really can't see this happening, times when Steam showed 80+% users running Intel iGPU are long gone and not coming back.

Those are my current views, we should wait and see what happens - which includes how good the DG-1 is, how much is costs and what are the customers reactions. Historically, 3rd player in GPU arena... never lasted. Intel iGPUs remain viable, just because near-monopoly on CPU side enforced it to users. AMD iGPUs ate them for breakfast, and the first one who remembers "Iris Pro" nonsense, should also remember where it was implemented, the CPU price range that is... Can't compare 100-200g AMD GCN-iGPU with Intel 500g+ stuff. I mean, you can, but then NVIDIA 2080 XT Mega Super Titan++++ will eat the DG-1 alive by 200,000% margin...

[EDIT]: I actually wrote this before reading AnandTech article... After reading it, I think the same - a lots of stuff there, and more between the lines...
Posted on Reply
#20
Midland Dog
Athlonite
Those are numbers for VRM (Voltage Regulation Module) counts... A discrete Graphics card is one that plugs into an PCIe slot on your motherboard it doesn't come built in to the CPU intel type or APU in AMD's case.
A Discrete Graphics card may or may not require an power plug to be plugged in to gain the extra power required to power the GPU usually these come in 6 pin or 8 pin configurations and sometimes multiples of each are required in
1 x 8pin or 2 x 8pin or 1 x 8pin + 1 x 6pin or 2 x 6pin and 1 x 6pin PCIe power plugs all depends on how much extra power the GPU requires over and above the 75W available via the PCIe slot
its a 25 watt target part, if it described phase count it would more likely be 3+1 or 4+1, and for a 25w card u wont need pcie power connectors
Posted on Reply
#21
P4-630
Now the chip has surfaced in the database of Sisoftware's Sandra benchmark software.

This shows that this particular card uses 3 GB vram, has 1 MB of L2 cache and can use 96 execution units running at 1.5 GHz. These 768 cores account for 2.3 teraflops of performance. That is slightly faster than the GTX 1050 Ti from Nvidia, which has the same number of cores.

In the benchmark, the chip is called 'Intel Gen12 Desktop Graphics Controller'. Since the result is labeled as a desktop system with a separate CPU, and as only one discrete GPU of this size seems to be under development, it will probably be this DG1. This card would be used by developers to optimize their software for Intel's new Gen 12 products, and the chip could end up in various economical devices.


nl.hardware.info/nieuws/71900/intels-dg1-gpu-met-3-gb-vram-opgedoken-in-benchmarkdatabase-iets-krachtiger-dan-1050-ti
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