Sunday, May 10th 2020

AMD Ryzen 7 4700G is "Renoir" Desktop AM4 Processor: 8-core/16-thread with "Vega" iGPU

It was only a matter of time before AMD brought its 7 nm "Renoir" APU silicon onto the desktop platform. The first such chip just hit the radar as the Ryzen 7 4700G. This would be the first desktop Ryzen APU graded as Ryzen 7, thanks to its CPU core count. The 4700G features an 8-core/16-thread CPU based on the "Zen 2" microarchitecture. The iGPU is a hybrid between "Vega" and "Navi."

The "Renoir" iGPU features the SIMD components of "Vega," but with the display- and multimedia-engines of "Navi." The iGPU apparently maxes out on 8 NGCUs on "Renoir," amounting to 512 stream processors. Increased iGPU engine clocks attempt to make up the CU deficit compared to the previous-generation "Picasso" (8 vs. 11). The CPU features 512 KB of L2 cache per core, and 8 MB of shared L3 cache (4 MB per CCX). An AoTS run in which the processor is paired with a Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics card surfaced on social media. Bringing "Renoir" to the desktop platform at prices competitive with Intel's 10th generation Core i3 thru Core i7 will be critical for AMD, as it nullifies a key advantage Intel has - integrated graphics, so the processors could make it to the vast majority of non-gaming builds with high CPU performance demand.

Update May 10th: A possible UserBenchmark submission of this processor, where it carries the engineering sample number "100-000000149-40_40/30_Y" surfaced. It's shown having clock speeds of 3.00 GHz base and 4.00 GHz boost. We know this is a desktop platform looking at its ASRock B550 Taichi motherboard and Micron-supplied standard DIMM.
Sources: _rogame (Twitter), TUM_APISAK (Twitter)
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84 Comments on AMD Ryzen 7 4700G is "Renoir" Desktop AM4 Processor: 8-core/16-thread with "Vega" iGPU

#1
GoldenX
No thanks, a 512SP Vega is too slow, unless they manage something like 2500MHz.
Posted on Reply
#2
dyonoctis
8Mo of L3 ? Damn, that's a farcry from the 3700x 36Mo...
Posted on Reply
#3
king of swag187
GoldenX
No thanks, a 512SP Vega is too slow, unless they manage something like 2500MHz.
So far from what we've seen in laptops, its faster than the previous gen by a fair bit.
Posted on Reply
#4
john_
A fully 7nm chip with 8 and probably latter 6 cores chip will not be cheap. I am guessing $350-$400 for the 8 core and over $200 for a potential 6 core model.
On the other hand, these chips could end up as OEM only options or soldered on mini ITX boards.
Posted on Reply
#5
ARF
This should become AMD's best gaming processor - a monolithic die without all the negatives of the chiplet approach.

This Ryzen 7 4700G probably is faster than Ryzen 7 3700X for the very same reason.

The Vega 512-shader iGPU will render the lowest-end discrete graphics cards obsolete.

You will no longer need any chiplet-based quad-core Ryzen.
Posted on Reply
#7
dj-electric
People might start thinking this is something else other than a Zen2 chip with traditional Vega iGPU in it.
Philosophically, im not too sure about having an 8 core one, but can see reasons for a sucess of a 6 core one
Posted on Reply
#8
ARF
dj-electric
People might start thinking this is something else other than a Zen2 chip with traditional Vega iGPU in it.
Philosophically, im not too sure about having an 8 core one, but can see reasons for a sucess of a 6 core one
This is a clocked higher Ryzen 9 4900H/HS. See where those belong, and you will see where this will end up.
Posted on Reply
#9
Mamya3084
dyonoctis
8Mo of L3 ? Damn, that's a farcry from the 3700x 36Mo...
*Correction* "GAME CACHE"
Posted on Reply
#11
king of swag187
ARF
This is a clocked higher Ryzen 9 4900H/HS. See where those belong, and you will see where this will end up.
In high end gaming and consumer laptops?

Joking aside, these look like promising chips or HTPC's doing CPU encoding, which I could see MASSIVELY benefitting from this.
Posted on Reply
#12
evernessince
GoldenX
That still is GT1030 territory, not an improvement at all for the desktop models.
Those are 25w laptop models.
Posted on Reply
#13
R0H1T
GoldenX
That still is GT1030 territory, not an improvement at all for the desktop models.
Compared to what? They're unmatched as far as APU are concerned, the closest anyone came to this was Intel with a Vega HBM GPU added to make one of the more intriguing products of the last decade.
Posted on Reply
#14
niemand
GoldenX
That still is GT1030 territory, not an improvement at all for the desktop models.
I believe real improvements for graphics performance will be introduced with Ryzen 5000 APUs which are expected to be Zen 3 CPU cores and Navi/RDNA based graphic units but MX250/GT1030 levels are still fine/good for an APU and yet an improvement over previous gen APUs.
Posted on Reply
#15
AusWolf
GoldenX
No thanks, a 512SP Vega is too slow, unless they manage something like 2500MHz.
It is still quite useful for the times when you're changing your discrete graphics card, addig extra displays, or for debugging purposes.
Posted on Reply
#17
londiste
dyonoctis
8Mo of L3 ? Damn, that's a farcry from the 3700x 36Mo...
It does not need that much L3 cache to hide the memory latency. Reviews seem to measure latency of 4000-series mobile CPUs to 40s-50s ns, which is much closer to Intel compared to chiplet CPUs.
Less L3 cache is probably detrimental to some workstation use cases but any desktop use case including gaming will not be affected by much from less cache.
ARF
This should become AMD's best gaming processor - a monolithic die without all the negatives of the chiplet approach.
This Ryzen 7 4700G probably is faster than Ryzen 7 3700X for the very same reason.
You will no longer need any chiplet-based quad-core Ryzen.
This. Given low enough prices, Ryzen 3000 series will be obsolete with the exception of 3900X and 3950X.
ARF
The Vega 512-shader iGPU will render the lowest-end discrete graphics cards obsolete.
Depends on what you mean by low. Anything current gen like GTX1650 or RX5500 are much much faster. GT1030 is ancient and nobody in their right mind (with possible exception of OEMs) will put that into a desktop computer. Desktop might get to GTX1050 level but GTX1050Ti will still remain faster.
Posted on Reply
#18
ARF
This needs at least triple-channel memory. If not quad channel. Imagine quad channel DDR4-4000. 128 GB/s memory bandwidth :)
Posted on Reply
#19
Apocalypsee
ARF
This needs at least triple-channel memory. If not quad channel. Imagine quad channel DDR4-4000. 128 GB/s memory bandwidth :)
I guess that's why they put 8CU and not more. There's not enough memory bandwidth to feed the iGPU. Still, they should stick 11CU like 3400G because there is enough CPU power now for multithreaded games.
Posted on Reply
#20
londiste
ARF
This needs at least triple-channel memory. If not quad channel. Imagine quad channel DDR4-4000. 128 GB/s memory bandwidth :)
More memory channels would drive the platform complexity and price up considerably. The solution to that will be DDR5, probably some time next year. DDR5 will double the bandwidth over DDR4 and bandwidth is what iGPU primarily relies upon.
Posted on Reply
#21
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
R0H1T
Compared to what? They're unmatched as far as APU are concerned, the closest anyone came to this was Intel with a Vega HBM GPU added to make one of the more intriguing products of the last decade.
Yeah. GT1030 performance in an APU would be pretty damn great.
Posted on Reply
#22
ARF
Apocalypsee
I guess that's why they put 8CU and not more. There's not enough memory bandwidth to feed the iGPU. Still, they should stick 11CU like 3400G because there is enough CPU power now for multithreaded games.
11-CU Vega 2.0 iGPU with higher than 90 GB/s memory bandwidth should match or exceed Polaris 21's Radeon RX 560X performance :)
londiste
More memory channels would drive the platform complexity and price up considerably. The solution to that will be DDR5, probably some time next year. DDR5 will double the bandwidth over DDR4 and bandwidth is what iGPU primarily relies upon.
DDR5 with Zen 4, which means Ryzen 6000 desktop APUs. The generation after Cezanne.

It would drive the complexity up but AMD will be free from having to design 100-150 sq. mm GPUs.

I guess this is the reason why Navi 23 is rumoured to be 240 sq. mm, Navi 22 to be 350 sq. mm and Navi 21 to be 505 sq. mm.

The Ryzen 5000 iGPU could end up as fast as GTX 1650 or even GTX 1660 series.

wccftech.com/amd-raytracing-allegedly-exclusive-high-end-rdna-2-navi-2x-gpus/
Posted on Reply
#23
theoneandonlymrk
londiste
It does not need that much L3 cache to hide the memory latency. Reviews seem to measure latency of 4000-series mobile CPUs to 40s-50s ns, which is much closer to Intel compared to chiplet CPUs.
Less L3 cache is probably detrimental to some workstation use cases but any desktop use case including gaming will not be affected by much from less cache.
This. Given low enough prices, Ryzen 3000 series will be obsolete with the exception of 3900X and 3950X.
Depends on what you mean by low. Anything current gen like GTX1650 or RX5500 are much much faster. GT1030 is ancient and nobody in their right mind (with possible exception of OEMs) will put that into a desktop computer. Desktop might get to GTX1050 level but GTX1050Ti will still remain faster.
It will be limited when it comes to pciex lanes made available to the user so not this time I don't think, maybe next generation.
Posted on Reply
#24
londiste
theoneandonlymrk
It will be limited when it comes to pciex lanes made available to the user so not this time I don't think, maybe next generation.
Bleh, you seem to be right. The mobile Renoir has 8+4+4 lanes.
Edit: For comparison, Raven Ridge has 8+4.
Posted on Reply
#25
theoneandonlymrk
londiste
Bleh, you seem to be right. The mobile Renoir has 8+4+4 lanes.
Well it does have a GPU attached, and is not made to lay waste to their own released generation R3#£#.
They have a plan it seams.
Posted on Reply
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