Thursday, May 21st 2020

ASRock Launches AMD B550 Motherboard Range

Leading global motherboard manufacturer, ASRock, proudly announces its latest range of motherboards featuring the new AMD B550 chipset, supporting AMD Ryzen desktop processors. "ASRock AMD B550 motherboard series brings exciting and innovating features such as PCIe 4.0 to the mainstream, ASRock offers a comprehensive range of motherboards from entry to premium, including the Taichi, PG Velocita, Extreme, Steel Legend and Pro4 series, leading features and excitement into the market." says Chris Lee, general manager of ASRock motherboard business unit.

"We are seeing increasing user demands for flexible systems that perform well in a multitude of tasks from gaming to content creation more than ever before," said Chris Kilburn, corporate vice president and general manager, client component business unit, AMD. "AMD is excited to bring the power of 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen desktop processors and cutting edge PCIe 4.0 support to the mainstream users with our latest AMD B550 chipset. With a wide range of form factors, power delivery options, and designs from our partners at ASRock, AMD is confident these new B550 platforms will provide flexibility and power never seen before on a mainstream platform."

The premium ASRock B550 Taichi incorporates 16 phases of the latest Dr.MOS VRMs, providing a superior power design that can handle even the highest performance Ryzen desktop processor, even when overclocking. With large, passive heatsinks and 2oz Copper PCB foundation, it keeps temperatures lower, the system is more stable and improves energy efficiency.

PG Velocita is a brand new high end product line under the Phantom Gaming family, the B550 PG Velocita motherboard packed full with uncompromised performance as well as relentless appearance. "Velocità" is Italian for "Velocity", destined to give a fast and unbeatable gaming experience to the gamers

Intelligent 2.5GbE is featured on many ASRock high-end & mainstream B550 products for maximum network performance. It is ideal for home NAS streaming and backups, content creators, online gamers, and the high-end demands of enthusiasts by boost networking performance 2.5X over typical GbE home networks to enjoy a noticeably faster connectivity experience for gaming, file transfers and backups.

With a wide range of options available including everything from entry to premium, mini-ITX, mATX and ATX, look no further because the ASRock B550-series motherboards bring luxury features and stylish designs throughout its comprehensive range.
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19 Comments on ASRock Launches AMD B550 Motherboard Range

#2
kapone32
simlariver
store availability when ?
They are supposed to launch on June 16. My thought process is that we will see pre-orders at the beginning of June.
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#3
Mats
I thought it would make sense to launch B550 at the same time as Renoir.
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#4
kapone32
Mats
I thought it would make sense to launch B550 at the same time as Renoir.
That would have been too long (and it already has been) between launches. As it stands I am going to get a B550 board and a 3100 or 3300 to play with until the fall. I will then I make my decision to stay on TR4 for my main rig or jump back into AM4, but the X670 must provide more PCIe lanes and I want them to do the same as some B550 and give us PCIe 3.0 lanes as well as 4.0.
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#5
Mats
kapone32
That would have been too long (and it already has been) between launches. As it stands I am going to get a B550 board and a 3100 or 3300 to play with until the fall. I will then I make my decision to stay on TR4 for my main rig or jump back into AM4, but the X670 must provide more PCIe lanes and I want them to do the same as some B550 and give us PCIe 3.0 lanes as well as 4.0.
No I meant launching Renoir soon, not delaying B550.

Sounds like you should wait for whatever comes after AM4, I don't think X670 is even a given at this point.
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#6
kapone32
Mats
No I meant launching Renoir soon, not delaying B550.

Sounds like you should wait for whatever comes after AM4, I don't think X670 is even a given at this point.
Actually I agree with that it would be nice to put a 7NM apu on a B550 board.

The reason I say X670 is whenever Ryzen3 launches I fully expect that new boards will be released as well. Everything is pointing to a truly magnificent 3rd quarter for enthusiasts.
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#7
simlariver
I really want to know if X670 is hapening or not. New boards would not be strange but a new chipset ? what would it bring ?
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#8
1d10t
simlariver
I really want to know if X670 is hapening or not. New boards would not be strange but a new chipset ? what would it bring ?
maybe mGPU support at full PCIe 4.0 x16 x16 ? :D
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#9
Mats
From what I have been told, there won't be any new DDR4 compatible premium chipsets from AMD. I.e. there is no X670. That doesn't mean there won't be new chipsets made by their partners, such at B550, so maybe we get a B650 in the future.
www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/why-no-one-has-the-right-to-be-angry-at-amd-with-regards-to-am4.267142/page-2#post-4266464

We can dream up all the lanes we want for the X570 successor, but AM4 is still a mainstream socket. Z490 didn't really up the ante in this regard either (or any other).
Posted on Reply
#10
kapone32
Mats
www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/why-no-one-has-the-right-to-be-angry-at-amd-with-regards-to-am4.267142/page-2#post-4266464

We can dream up all the lanes we want for the X570 successor, but AM4 is still a mainstream socket. Z490 didn't really up the ante in this regard either (or any other).
I know exactly what you mean. My last AM3 board was the Sabretooth 990FX. I was on X370/X470 but whelmed by the lack of I/O. I am on TR4 and would love to jump to TRX40 (88+ PCIe 4.0) but I wish AMD would release an affordable CPU for that. As it stands my main PC has one HDD and 3 SSDs but my kryptonite are my 9 NVME drives so I need. The mainstream would help with a PLX chip even if it added nanoseconds of latency. From what I have read about B550 to this point I like it more than X570. I really like the As Rock B550 Taichi.
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#11
simlariver
Even the Extreme 4 and Steel Legend have dual 8-segment debug code. That's unexpected. Maybe the Steel legend is going upmarket.
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#12
PLSG08
8+4 pin for b550? Would the 4 pin need to be populated as well?
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#13
Chrispy_
Hopefully the VRM on the B550M Pro4 is as good as the B450M Pro4 was.

That motherboard stood out on the usual VRM quality charts as punching way above its price range. Better than Asus TUF/Prime options and any of the similarly-priced Gigabyte and MSI stuff. I have one in the machine I'm typing on right now and I've used it for a few other Zen2 builds that were budget-sensitive and not dumping a 3900X into the socket.

For higher end builds I suspect MSI will have the upper-midrange sewn up. I just hope their BIOSes aren't still garbage.
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#14
milewski1015
PLSG08
8+4 pin for b550? Would the 4 pin need to be populated as well?
From what I've heard from watching Buildzoid, the additional CPU power connector is unnecessary unless you're doing extreme overclocking.
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#15
1d10t
Chrispy_
For higher end builds I suspect MSI will have the upper-midrange sewn up. I just hope their BIOSes aren't still garbage.
I kinda agree with you, though I believe you haven't tried MAX lineup yet :D
Their A-XMP proved to be quite useful for people who are clueless about high frequency RAM, as MSI boasting it alongside their MemTryIt.No need to manually tweak timing or fiddling with DRAM Calculator, just 3 - 4 reboot and you have optimal timing with highest clock. On the contrary, their voltage regulator kinda subpar :wtf:
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#16
kapone32
Chrispy_
Hopefully the VRM on the B550M Pro4 is as good as the B450M Pro4 was.

That motherboard stood out on the usual VRM quality charts as punching way above its price range. Better than Asus TUF/Prime options and any of the similarly-priced Gigabyte and MSI stuff. I have one in the machine I'm typing on right now and I've used it for a few other Zen2 builds that were budget-sensitive and not dumping a 3900X into the socket.

For higher end builds I suspect MSI will have the upper-midrange sewn up. I just hope their BIOSes aren't still garbage.
MSI probably will but As Rock (for me) has been rock solid on AM4. MSI is nice though because their board layout and aesthetics are very striking. I seriously hope the price range is $75 to $200 US for all B550 boards. At that range they would sell pretty well.
Posted on Reply
#17
Chrispy_
1d10t
I kinda agree with you, though I believe you haven't tried MAX lineup yet :D
Their A-XMP proved to be quite useful for people who are clueless about high frequency RAM, as MSI boasting it alongside their MemTryIt.No need to manually tweak timing or fiddling with DRAM Calculator, just 3 - 4 reboot and you have optimal timing with highest clock. On the contrary, their voltage regulator kinda subpar :wtf:
I've used plenty of their MAX boards. They still have janky mouse support in the BIOS and the layout of the various menus, as well as they way they rename some CPU/Chipset features only adds to the confusion for newbies trying to follow generic tweak guides.

I follow Buildzoid because he seems to know his s*** when it comes to motherboards and his summary of 400-series boards praised MSI for having the best midrange VRM design and VRM cooling but the worst BIOSes all four Tier-1 vendors.

I dislike the MSI ClickBIOS but I don't generally have a problem with them. They're needlessly graphical and a bit disorganised but I can get the settings I want from them and have never encountered show-stopping bugs. He genuinely hates them - if you really start to do advanced tuning you'll run into broken features that don't do what they're supposed to, don't apply unless you do them in a specific order, or conflict with other settings. Like most reviewers, he'll be providing feedback to manufacturers on pre-release products and beta BIOS versions so the fact that stuff is still broken AFTER they've been assisting vendors with product development is probably extra annoying.
kapone32
MSI probably will but As Rock (for me) has been rock solid on AM4. MSI is nice though because their board layout and aesthetics are very striking. I seriously hope the price range is $75 to $200 US for all B550 boards. At that range they would sell pretty well.
Asrock BIOSes have been decent for me. They're pretty minimal but outside of the raw exposed AGESA options everything just works. The AGESA pages you need to know what you're doing and shouldn't touch a single option unless you fully understand that you can't always touch one thing without having to also compensate for other stuff. As a basic BIOS for everyday users looking to do some modest CPU/RAM overclocking I can't fault Asrock.
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#18
kapone32
Chrispy_
I've used plenty of their MAX boards. They still have janky mouse support in the BIOS and the layout of the various menus, as well as they way they rename some CPU/Chipset features only adds to the confusion for newbies trying to follow generic tweak guides.

I follow Buildzoid because he seems to know his s*** when it comes to motherboards and his summary of 400-series boards praised MSI for having the best midrange VRM design and VRM cooling but the worst BIOSes all four Tier-1 vendors.

I dislike the MSI ClickBIOS but I don't generally have a problem with them. They're needlessly graphical and a bit disorganised but I can get the settings I want from them and have never encountered show-stopping bugs. He genuinely hates them - if you really start to do advanced tuning you'll run into broken features that don't do what they're supposed to, don't apply unless you do them in a specific order, or conflict with other settings. Like most reviewers, he'll be providing feedback to manufacturers on pre-release products and beta BIOS versions so the fact that stuff is still broken AFTER they've been assisting vendors with product development is probably extra annoying.


Asrock BIOSes have been decent for me. They're pretty minimal but outside of the raw exposed AGESA options everything just works. The AGESA pages you need to know what you're doing and shouldn't touch a single option unless you fully understand that you can't always touch one thing without having to also compensate for other stuff. As a basic BIOS for everyday users looking to do some modest CPU/RAM overclocking I can't fault Asrock.
Exactly but for me there is enough there ( I actually appreciate the Spartan layout) to not even need to look at AGESA and other features are clearly laid out too. The only AM4 Asrock board that has died on me was a B350Pro ATX.
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#19
Cranky5150
Meh..I'll pass. My experience with Asrock has not been good...(aka Steel Legend x570)
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