Wednesday, August 12th 2020

AMD "Cezanne" APU Spotted: Retains Renoir's iGPU, Updates CPU to "Zen 3"

AMD's 5th Generation Ryzen "Cezanne" APU sprung up on SiSoft SANDRA database, with big hints as to the areas where the company could innovate next. Apparently, "Cezanne" is a very similar silicon to "Renoir." It appears to feature the same iGPU solution, based on the "Vega" architecture. We're now learning that the iGPU even has the same core configuration, with up to 512 stream processors, and a likely bump in iGPU engine clocks over the Ryzen 4000 "Renoir" chips.

Much of the innovation is with the CPU component. Although the CPU core count is not yet known, the company is deploying its "Zen 3" microarchitecture, which sees all cores on the silicon sharing a large common slab of L3 cache. The "Vega" based iGPU should still perform better than the solution on "Renoir," as it's assisted by higher engine clocks, and possibly a higher IPC CPU component. In the SANDRA screenshot, the iGPU was shown bearing 1.85 GHz engine clocks, which amounts to a 100 MHz speed-bump compared to the engine clocks of the Ryzen 4000H and 4000U.
Sources: _rogame (Twitter), VideoCardz
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21 Comments on AMD "Cezanne" APU Spotted: Retains Renoir's iGPU, Updates CPU to "Zen 3"

#1
Flanker
5th generation Ryzen APU? Isn't that the 4th? There is no first generation otherwise.

Vega iGPU forever lol.
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#2
geon2k2
why still Vega, this is very old tech by now.
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#4
Turmania
Disappointing they will still use vega.
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#5
Dredi
geon2k2
why still Vega, this is very old tech by now.
It wouldn’t be any faster with RDNA(2), as it is completely limited by the memory throughput of DDR4. Only the performance per watt per chip area matters here and the tuned VEGA is pretty good at that.
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#6
Punkenjoy
Also AMD made improvement to vega you found on these chips. It's not the same vega than you find on vega 64 or first APU. They have fine tuned it for being an APU.

For most people, they just want their APU to be low power, that their video decode without using too much cpu and that's it. Gaming on APU is a thing, but it's not big enough of a thing to justify investing heavily into APU performance.

I would still like to be able to buy an APU running 1080p games high details at 60 fps with a 35 watt tdp but that is not going to happen soon.
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#7
dj-electric
Seems like 2020 marks flagship iGPU performacne being of the blue side.
Oh well, you win some you lose some. Tune in to pretty much any media in 26 hours to know more.
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#8
Vya Domus
dj-electric
Seems like 2020 marks flagship iGPU performacne being of the blue side.
You sure about that ?
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#9
dj-electric
Vya Domus
You sure about that ?
I'm just a step above "sure" with that.
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#10
Dredi
dj-electric
Seems like 2020 marks flagship iGPU performacne being of the blue side.
Oh well, you win some you lose some. Tune in to pretty much any media in 26 hours to know more.
Maybe in some extremely shader intensive game at 720p or lower resolution. Any higher and the memory throughput will be the limiting factor on both processors. Also relevant tests need to be made by third parties, I wouldn’t trust intel to benchmark anything.
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#14
dj-electric
dj-electric
Seems like 2020 marks flagship iGPU performacne being of the blue side.
As far as im aware, 2020 is not over yet. I stand by my claim.
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#15
Vya Domus
2020 is not over yet but it gotta be team blue for some reason.

k :rolleyes:
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#16
watzupken
I feel the title is very misleading. Factually it is possible that AMD is likely going to retain Vega on their new APU. But that screenshot shown did not suggest that Vega 8 will be coupled with the fastest APU model. With Intel supposedly catching up in the iGPU space, I suspect AMD may bump up the the Vega CU count for the higher end models.

Anyway, that screenshot shows DDR3 and a very low memory bandwidth that does not make sense.
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#17
JAB Creations
dj-electric
I... Don't seem to find Intel Xe-LP Gen12 iGPU in there... Apologies....
Because Intel hasn't released their 12th generation, they literally soft-launched their 11th like what? Maybe two months ago. Trying to compare future products to current products is not an objective comparison.
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#18
dj-electric
JAB Creations
Because Intel hasn't released their 12th generation, they literally soft-launched their 11th like what? Maybe two months ago. Trying to compare future products to current products is not an objective comparison.
Hence 2020 claim. I'm sorta making a bet here, but confident in it. Previous gen soft-launch was earlier this year, next-gen soft-launch sooner than it might seem to people.
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#19
Jism
geon2k2
why still Vega, this is very old tech by now.
Old ?

On lower clocks, CU's and all that its a very efficient GPU. Only bottleneck is its memory bandwidth.
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#20
ExcuseMeWtf
Dredi
It wouldn’t be any faster with RDNA(2), as it is completely limited by the memory throughput of DDR4. Only the performance per watt per chip area matters here and the tuned VEGA is pretty good at that.
So RDNA is worse in that regard?

Or maybe it's just "if it ain't broke don't fix it" mantra applied to save on some R&D?
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#21
Dredi
ExcuseMeWtf
So RDNA is worse in that regard?

Or maybe it's just "if it ain't broke don't fix it" mantra applied to save on some R&D?
It’s not sure. Vega was specifically optimized for APU use in the 4000 series. It is likely that the RDNA architecture had other design considerations, like being able to compete with Ampere. Maybe it could be slightly better, but not in a way that would matter.
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