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AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 9 5950X CPU-Z Scores Surface

Scores for AMD's upcoming Zen 3 Ryzen 7 5800X (8 core, 16 thread) and Ryzen 9 5950X (16 core, 32 thread) have surfaced on the CPU-Z benchmark. The results, which should - as always - be taken with appropriate salt, point towards the Ryzen 7 5800X scoring 650 single-core and 6593 points in the multi-threaded benchmark. The Ryzen 9 5950X is rated as scoring 690.2 points in the same single-threaded benchmark and 13306.5 points in the multi-threaded one. CPU-Z scores for the Intel Core i9-10900K (10 cores, 20 threads) are set at 584 and 7389 points respectively. This is further fuel to the fire on AMD's current technology and performance leadership.

AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Takes the Crown of the Fastest CPU in Passmark Single-Thread Results

AMD has been improving its Zen core design, and with the latest Zen 3 IP found in Ryzen 5000 series CPUs, it seems like the company struck gold. Thanks to the reporting of VideoCardz, we come to know that AMD's upcoming Ryzen 5 5600X CPU has been benchmarked and compared to other competing offerings. In the CPU benchmark called PassMark, which rates all of the CPUs by multi-threaded and single-threaded performance, AMD's Ryzen 5 5600X CPU has taken the crown of the fastest CPU in the single-threaded results chart. Scoring an amazing 3495 points, it is now the fastest CPU for 1T workloads. That puts the CPU above Intel's current best—Core i9-10900K—which scores 3177 points. This puts the Zen 3 core about 10% ahead of the competition.

As a reminder, the AMD Ryzen 5 5600X CPU is a six-core, twelve threaded design that has a base clock of 3.7 GHz and boosts the frequency of the cores to 4.6 GHz, all within the TDP of 65 Watts. The CPU has 32 MB of level-3 (L3) cache and 3 MB of L2 cache.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X, 5950X Also Benchmarked in Geekbench 5

It would seem that a number of players have received their Zen 3 samples, considering the amount of performance leaks that have surfaced just in the past two days. The new AMD Zen 3 processors carry a huge weight on their shoulders - demonstrating AMD's touted leadership in CPU performance in all metrics, whilst justifying their increased pricing against Zen 2 offerings. Many rivers of ink (and some tears) have flown in regards to pricing of the new AMD processors, so it all pertains to performance considerations on whether that pricing is justified or not.

Leaker extraordinaire TUM_APISAK has leaked some benchmarks on AMD's upcoming Ryzen 9 5900X and 5950X CPUs - namely, in Geekbench 5. In this round of leaks - which are, admittedly, originating from two different systems), the 12-core, 24-thread AMD Ryzen 9 5900X scores 1605 points in single-core and 12869 in the Multi-core benchmarks. The 16-core, 32-thread Ryzen 9 5950X, on the other hand, scores 1575 points in single and 13605 points in Multi-core workloads. The Ryzen 9 5900X's higher base clocks may be responsible for the higher single-core score; however, the Ryzen 9 5959X pulls ahead - expectedly - in the Multi-core portion of the benchmark. Comparing scores between the Zen 3 5950X and the Zen-based 3950X (via AnandTech), which carry the same amount of cores, the 5950X offers a 18% and 12% advantage, respectively, in the single and multi-threaded tests - not a far cry from AMD's touted 19% IPC uplift.

BIOSTAR AM4 400 series motherboards support AMD Ryzen 5000 Vermeer series processors with BIOS update

BIOSTAR, a leading brand of motherboards, graphics cards, and storage devices, today announces that their AM4 400 series motherboards will support the latest generation AMD Ryzen 5000 Vermeer series Zen 3 processors. BIOS updates supporting the AMD Ryzen 5000 Vermeer series processors on BIOSTAR AM4 400 series motherboards will be available starting January 2021. The details will be subject to BIOSTAR official website announcement.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Pictured in the Flesh

Here's the first picture showing AMD's Ryzen 5000 series "Zen 3" desktop processors in the flesh. The first wave of Ryzen 5000 series for the retail channel include the Ryzen 5 5600X, the Ryzen 7 5800X, the Ryzen 9 5900X and the 5950X. All four chips are shown sitting on a tray. All four chips are compatible with existing Socket AM4 motherboards based on the AMD 500 series chipset motherboard with a BIOS update; and with the 400-series using a special beta BIOS which will be released in January 2021. The four should be available for purchase in the retail channel by November 5, 2020, with the 6-core/12-thread 5600X priced at USD $300, the 8-core/16-thread 5800X at $450, the 12-core/24-thread 5900X at $550, and the flagship 16-core/32-thread 5950X at $800.

AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Benchmarked, Conquers Intel Core i5-10600K

Since AMD announced its next-generation Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors based on Zen 3 core, everyone has been wondering how the new processors perform. For a detailed review and performance numbers, you should wait for official reviews. However, today we have the scores of Ryzen 5 5600X CPU. Thanks to the popular hardware leaker @TUM_APISAK, the Ryzen 5 5600X performance numbers in the SiSoftware Sandra benchmark suite have been leaked. When digging under the hood, the new Ryzen CPU contains six of Zen 3 cores with 12 threads, paired with as much as 32 MB of level three (L3) cache. These cores are running at 3.7 GHz base frequency, while the boost speeds are reaching 4.6 GHz.

In the test results, the AMD Ryzen 5 5600X CPU has scored Processor Arithmetic and Processor Multi-Media scores of 255.22 GOPS and 904.38 Mpix/s. These scores are not much on their own until we compare them to some of the Intel offerings. When compared to the Intel Core i5-10600K CPU, which is likely its targeted competing category, it scores 224.07 GOPS and 662.33 Mpix/s for Processor Arithmetic and Processor Multi-Media tests respectively. This puts the AMD CPU ahead 13.9% and 36.5% in these tests, indicating the possibility of Zen 3. Another important note here is the thermal headroom both of these CPUs run. While the Intel model is constrained withing 125 W TDP, the AMD model runs at just 65 W TDP. This could be an indication of the efficiency that these new processors harness.

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 16-core "Zen 3" Processor Overclocked to 6 GHz and Geekbenched

Thai PC enthusiast TUM_APISAK discovered a Geekbench 5 database listing for an upcoming AMD Ryzen 9 5950X "Zen 3" processor, obtained on MacOS. Don't worry, Apple isn't making an AMD-powered iMac Pro as its x86 swansong, because the listing points to a Hackintosh setup using Acidanthera boot-loader. The 5950X engineering sample scores 17448 points multi-threaded, and 2024 points single-core. Here's the best part—the processor appears to be overclocked to 6 GHz, as pointed out in the gb5 files of the benchmark listings, which show the processor's frequency swing between 5931 MHz and 6023 MHz during the test. harukaze5719 compiled a nice bar-graph that compares the 6 GHz overclocked 5950X "Zen 3" to 5.88 GHz overclocked 3950X "Zen 2," and other processors in its class, such as the Core i9-10900K. Find the Geebench listing here.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Features Three Synchronized Memory Clock Domains

A leaked presentation slide by AMD for its Ryzen 5000 series "Zen 3" processors reveals details of the processor's memory interface. Much like the Ryzen 3000 series "Matisse," the Ryzen 5000 series "Vermeer" is a multi-chip module of up to 16 CPU cores spread across two 8-core CPU dies, and a unified I/O die that handles the processor's memory-, PCIe, and SoC interfaces. There are three configurable clock domains that ensure the CPU cores are fed with data at the right speed, and to ensure that the MCM design doesn't pose bottlenecks to the memory performance.

The first domain is fclk or Infinity Fabric clock. Each of the two CCDs (8-core CPU dies) has just one CCX (CPU core complex) with 8 cores, and hence the CCD's internal Infinity Fabric cedes relevance to the IFOP (Infinity Fabric over Package) interconnect that binds the two CCDs and the cIOD (client I/O controller die) together. The next frequency is uclk, or the internal frequency of the dual-channel DDR4 memory controller contained in the cIOD. And lastly, the mclk, or memory clock is the industry-standard DRAM frequency.

AMD Big Navi Performance Claims Compared to TPU's Own Benchmark Numbers of Comparable GPUs

AMD in its October 8 online launch event for the Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" processors, provided a teaser of the company's next flagship graphics card slotted in the Radeon RX 6000 series. This particular SKU has been referred to by company CEO Lisa Su as "Big Navi," meaning it could be the top part from AMD's upcoming client GPU lineup. As part of the teaser, Su held up the reference design card, and provided three performance numbers of the card as tested on a machine powered by a Ryzen 9 5900X "Zen 3" processor. We compared these performance numbers, obtained at 4K UHD, with our own testing data for the games, to see how the card compares to other current-gen cards in its class. Our testing data for one of the games is from the latest RTX 30-series reviews, find details of our test bed here. We obviously have a different CPU since the 5900X is unreleased, but use the highest presets in our testing.

With "Borderlands 3" at 4K, with "badass" performance preset and DirectX 12 renderer, AMD claims a frame-rate of 61 FPS. We tested the game with its DirectX 12 renderer in our dedicated performance review (test bed details here). AMD's claimed performance ends up 45.9 percent higher than that of the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti as tested by us, which yields 41.8 FPS on our test bed. The RTX 3080 ends up 15.24 percent faster than Big Navi, with 70.3 FPS. It's important to note here that AMD may be using a different/lighter test scene than us, since we don't use internal benchmark tools of games, and design our own test scenes. It's also important to note that we tested Borderlands 3 with DirectX 12 only in the game's launch-day review, and use the DirectX 11 renderer in our regular VGA reviews.

AMD Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" "Vermeer" Launch Liveblog

AMD is announcing its next-generation Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors in the Socket AM4 package. These 7 nm processors see the implementation of the company's new "Zen 3" microarchitecture, and are expected to push the performance envelope. AMD CEO Dr Lisa Su takes centerstage in a pre-recorded launch event stream which we are live-blogging. These are facts as they appear, along with our analysis.

Update 16:01 UTC: Looks like this is a pre-recorded stream made to look live (a premiere).

ASUS Also Unveils ROG Strix B550-XE Gaming Motherboard

As we explained in our older article about the new ASUS ROG Crosshair XII Dark Hero, AMD's Ryzen 5000 series Socket AM4 processors based on the "Zen 3" microarchitecture are unlikely to be accompanied by a new chipset, presenting motherboard makers with the opportunity to refresh their AMD 500-series chipset product stacks with new products. ASUS has a new premium product based on the AMD X570, in the form of the ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero. The company also unveiled a premium product based on the AMD B550 chipset—the ROG Strix B550-XE Gaming. While the Dark Hero is an incremental upgrade over the original Crosshair VIII Hero while retaining the PCB design, this particular board appears to be largely based on the ROG Strix B550-E Gaming.

ASUS has traditionally used the "XE" brand extension for ROG Strix series motherboard refreshes to denote improved CPU VRM, and this appears to be the case with the B550-XE Gaming, too. The board features a meatier 16-phase CPU VRM, with a more elaborate VRM cooling solution that uses larger heatsinks, which are interconnected by a flat heat-pipe, and unless we're mistaken, a 40 mm fan underneath the rear I/O shroud. The rest of the board's feature-set appears to be identical to that of the B550-E Gaming.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero Motherboard Pictured

AMD is expected to announce its 5th Gen Ryzen Socket AM4 processors based on the "Zen 3" microarchitecture later today, and it's rumored that these chips will not be accompanied by a new chipset. Motherboard vendors aren't missing the opportunity to refresh their product-stacks with new boards based on existing AMD X570 and B550 chipsets. ASUS has a new premium Socket AM4 product in the works, the ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero. We know this board is based on the X570 from its unchanged generation number "VIII," for this chipset.

From what we can tell, the ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero is based on an identical PCB design to the original Crosshair VIII Hero/WiFi. The changes appear to be cosmetic, with all of the board's heatsink design and color schemes aligning with the company's latest ROG generation (eg: the Maximus XII Hero). Another interesting spot by our readers is that the board lacks a chipset fan, and makes do with passive cooling for the X570. Dark, diagonal ridges replace the smooth brushed metal with chrome-like accents of the original. It remains to be seen if the new wave of AM4 motherboards come with out-of-the-box support for Ryzen 5000 series, since the data-sheet for the Dark Hero only mentions 2nd- and 3rd-Gen Ryzen chips. In any case, the board supports USB BIOS Flashback, and all AMD 500-series chipset motherboards are expected to receive Ryzen 5000 support through BIOS updates.
ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero
Update 12:32 UTC: ASUS mentions the two key areas of development for the Dark Hero are a completely fanless chipset cooling solution, and the use of 90 A DrMOS in the CPU VRM (compared to 60 A on the original).

AMD Confirms Ryzen 5000 Series Nomenclature for "Vermeer"

AMD earlier today made public its YouTube live-stream link for its next-generation Ryzen desktop processor. Its title reads "Where Gaming Begins | AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors." This confirms the Ryzen 5000 series nomenclature for the company's Socket AM4 desktop processors based on the "Zen 3" architecture, based on a multi-chip module codenamed "Vermeer." This would effectively make these chips "5th Generation Ryzen." Rumors of the 5000 series nomenclature first surfaced in mid-September, when the running theory was that with the "Zen 2" based "Renoir" taking up many of the model numbers in the 4000 series (eg: 4700G, 4750G, etc.,) AMD would want to segment its next-generation chips in a higher number series. The AMD Ryzen 5000 series "Zen 3" launch event is set to go live in under 13 hours from now.

Intel Confirms Q1-2021 Launch of 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake"

Intel VP and GM of Client Computing Group Desktop, Workstations and Gaming, John Bonini, in a Medium blog post renewed the company's commitment to gaming, by announcing the tentative launch timeline of the company's next-generation Core desktop processors. The 11th Gen Intel Core "Rocket Lake" processors will launch in Q1-2021. "I'm also happy to confirm that the next generation 11th Gen Intel Core desktop processors (codenamed "Rocket Lake") is coming in the first quarter of 2021 and will provide support for PCIe 4.0. It'll be another fantastic processor for gaming, and we're excited to disclose more details in the near future," he said.

It's important to note the timing of this post. AMD later today (8th October) will announce its next-generation Ryzen processors based on the "Zen 3" microarchitecture, and is widely expected to push the IPC envelope even further. This would mean that from the near-parity AMD enjoys with Intel's "Skylake" based "Comet Lake" processor, AMD would begin to achieve a clear IPC lead over Intel for the first time in over 15 years. An alleged Intel 500-series chipset motherboard launch-related slide leaked earlier this week pins the chipset's launch in mid-March 2021. Given that Intel tends to launch new processors and chipsets in tandem, this would possibly put the launch of "Rocket Lake" toward the very end of Q1-2021. "Rocket Lake" is expected to introduce Intel's first IPC gains in the desktop segment since 2015. The chips use new "Cypress Cove" CPU cores, which are a 14 nm backport of "Willow Cove."

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X CPU-Z Bench Score Leaks, 27% Higher 1T Performance Over 3700X

With AMD expected to announce its 5th Generation Ryzen "Vermeer" desktop processors next week, the rumor-mill is grinding the finest spices. This time, an alleged CPU-Z Bench score of a 12-core/24-thread Ryzen 9 5900X processor surfaced. CPU-Z by CPUID has a lightweight internal benchmark that evaluates the single-threaded and multi-threaded performance of the processor, and provides reference scores from a selection of processors for comparison. The alleged 5900X sample is shown belting out a multi-threaded (nT) score of 9481.8 points, and single-threaded (1T) score of 652.8 points.

When compared to the internal reference score by CPUID for the Ryzen 7 3700X 8-core/16-thread processor, which is shown with 511 points 1T and 5433 points nT, the alleged 5900X ends up with a staggering 27% higher 1T score, and a 74% higher nT score. While the nT score is largely attributable to the 50% higher core-count, the 1T score is interesting. We predict that besides possibly higher clock-speeds for the 5900X, the "Zen 3" microarchitecture does offer a certain amount of IPC gain over "Zen 2" to account for the 27%. AMD's IPC parity with Intel is likely to tilt in its favor with "Zen 3," until Intel can whip something up with its "Cypress Cove" CPU cores on the 14 nm "Rocket Lake-S" processor.

AMD "Lucienne" Silicon to Power Certain Ryzen 5000 Series APUs

There's been much chatter in the social media about a new piece of AMD APU silicon, codenamed "Lucienne." It's being rumored that "Lucienne" is a refresh of the current-generation "Renoir" silicon, and is an APU with eight "Zen 2" CPU cores and eight "Vega" NGCUs. One of the first SKUs based on the die is the Ryzen 7 5700U, which surfaced on the AoTS benchmark database.

The 5700U is possibly a 15 W ultra-portable processor, and according to the AoTS benchmark screenshot, it comes with an 8-core/16-thread CPU (the 4700U is 8-core/8-thread). The addition of SMT helps the 5700U shore up much of its performance lead over the 4700U. It also turns out that the Ryzen 5000 will see two APU dies driving AMD's product-stack, with "Lucienne" powering the Ryzen 5 5500U and Ryzen 7 5700U; while the newer "Cezanne" die, which introduces "Zen 3" CPU cores, powers the Ryzen 5 5600U and the Ryzen 7 5800U.

AMD "Vermeer" Zen 3 Processors Branded Under Ryzen 5000 Series?

AMD is allegedly preparing to market its next-generation Socket AM4 desktop processors based on the "Vermeer" MCM, under the Ryzen 5000 Series. The "Vermeer" MCM implements the company's "Zen 3" microarchitecture in the client segment. It features up to two 7 nm-class CPU complex dies with up to 8 cores, each, and a refreshed cIOD (client IO die). AMD has allegedly improved the cIOD with a new memory controller and several new toggles that improve memory bandwidth. The cIOD combines a PCI-Express Gen 4 root complex with a dual-channel DDR4 memory controller. With "Zen 3," AMD is also introducing an improved boosting algorithm, and an improved SMT feature.

Coming back to AMD's rumored nomenclature, and we could see the company bumping up its processor model numbers to the 5000 series for equivalent core-counts. For example, the Ryzen 9 5900X is a 12-core/24-thread part, much like the 3900X; whereas the Ryzen 7 5800X is an 8-core/16-thread part. This flies in the face of rumors that AMD could take advantage of the 8-core CCX design of the "Zen 3" microarchitecture by carving out 10-core parts using two CCDs with 5 cores enabled, each. The reason AMD is skipping the 4000 series numbering with "Vermeer" probably has something to do with "Renoir" taking up many of the 4000-series model numbers. "Renoir" is based on "Zen 2," and recently made its desktop debut, albeit as an OEM-exclusive. The company is planning to introduce certain 4000G series models to the DIY retail segment. AMD is expected to announce its first "Zen 3" client-segment processors on October 8, 2020.

AMD Announces a Red October: Zen 3 on October 8, RDNA2 on October 28

AMD CEO Dr Lisa Su on Twitter just announced AMD's next-generation Ryzen processors based on the "Zen 3" microarchitecture, and next-generation Radeon RX graphics cards based on the RDNA2 graphics architecture. AMD is promising a "red" October, with next-generation Ryzen "Zen 3" launch on October 8, and next-generation Radeon RDNA2 launch on October 28. We know for sure that AMD is referring to Ryzen and not EPYC, looking at the Socket AM4 MCM animation being used. The teaser picture for Radeon RDNA2 also hints at a new reference cooling solution with large axial fans.

Update 16:54 UTC: In a separate Tweet, AMD announced the Radeon RX 6000 series graphics cards, based on the "breakthrough" RDNA2 graphics architecture.

AMD 4th Gen Ryzen "Vermeer" Zen 3 Rumored to Include 10-core Parts

Yuri "1usmus" Bubliy, author of DRAM Calculator for Ryzen and the upcoming ClockTuner for Ryzen, revealed three pieces of juicy details on the upcoming 4th Gen AMD Ryzen "Vermeer" performance desktop processors. He predicts AMD turning up CPU core counts with this generation, including the introduction of new 10-core SKUs, possibly to one-up Intel in the multi-threaded performance front. Last we heard, AMD's upcoming "Zen 3" CCDs (chiplets) feature 8 CPU cores sharing a monolithic 32 MB slab of L3 cache. This should, in theory, allow AMD to create 10-core chips with two CCDs, each with 5 cores enabled.

Next up, are two features that should interest overclockers - which is Bubliy's main domain. The processors should support a feature called "Curve Optimizer," enabling finer-grained control over the boost algorithm, and on a per-core basis. As we understand, the "curve" in question could even be voltage/frequency. It remains to be seen of the feature is leveraged at a CBS level (UEFI setup program), or by Ryzen Master. Lastly, there's mention of new Infinity Fabric dividers that apparently helps you raise DCT (memory controller) frequencies "slightly higher" in mixed mode. AMD is expected to debut its 4th Gen Ryzen "Vermeer" desktop processors within 2020.

AMD Zen 3-based EPYC Milan CPUs to Usher in 20% Performance Increase Compared to Rome

According to a report courtesy of Hardwareluxx, where contributor Andreas Schilling reportedly gained access to OEM documentation, AMD's upcoming EPYC Milan CPUs are bound to offer up to 20% performance improvements over the previous EPYC generation. The report claims a 15% IPC performance, paired with an extra 5% added via operating frequency optimization. The report claims that AMD's 64-core designs will feature a lower-clock all-core operating mode, and a 32-core alternate for less threaded workloads where extra frequency is added to the working cores.

Apparently, AMD's approach for the Zen 3 architecture does away with L3 subdivisions according to CCXs; now, a full 32 MB of L3 cache is available for each 8-core Core Compute Die (CCD). AMD has apparently achieved new levels of frequency optimization under Zen 3, with higher upward frequency limits than before. This will see the most benefits in lower core-count designs, as the amount of heat being generated is necessarily lesser compared to more core-dense designs. Milan keeps the same 7 nm manufacturing tech, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, and 120-225 W TDP as the previous-gen Rome. It remains to be seen how these changes actually translate to the consumer versions of Zen 3, Vermeer, later this year.

ASUS Announces A520 Motherboards

ASUS today announced the new A520 chipset motherboards for its TUF Gaming, Prime and Pro series. The AMD A520 chipset is the successor to the A320 chipset, and features PCIe 3.0. Designed to cater to a wide range of needs, these motherboards feature a 32 MB BIOS flash ROM, and support future AMD Ryzen Zen 3 architecture CPUs and APUs.

ASUS A520 motherboards can be paired with an AMD APU to create a budget-friendly gaming rig or workstation, making them ideal for DIY PC users and small to medium-sized businesses. ASUS is also pleased to announce that its R&D team broke the existing world memory frequency record, setting DDR4- 6666 on ROG Strix B550-I Gaming, using the AMD Ryzen 4700GE processor and Crucial Ballistix MAX memory.

AMD Warhol, Van Gogh, and Cezanne to Make Up Company's 5th Gen Ryzen

A May 2020 report put together with info from multiple sources pointed towards AMD's client-segment product roadmap going as far into the future as 2022. The roadmap was partial, with a few missing bits. VideoCardz attempted to reconstruct the roadmap based on new information from one of the primary sources of the May leak, @MeibuW. According to the roadmap, 2020 will see AMD debut its 4th Gen Ryzen "Vermeer" desktop processors featuring "Zen 3" CPU cores, built on TSMC N7e or N7P silicon fabrication process, and offering PCIe Gen 4. The "Renoir" APU silicon combining up to 8 "Zen 2" CPU cores with a 512-SP "Vega" iGPU debuted on the mobile platform, and recently launched on the desktop platform as an OEM-exclusive. It remains to be seen if AMD launches this in the DIY retail channel.

2021 is when three new codenames from AMD get some air-time. "Warhol" is codename for the 5th Gen Ryzen part that succeeds "Vermeer." Interestingly, it too is shown as a combination of "Zen 3" CPU cores, PCIe Gen 4, and 7 nm. Perhaps AMD could innovate in areas such as DRAM (switch to PC DDR5), and maybe increase core counts. DDR5 could herald a new socket, after 4 years of AM4. The second silicon bound for 2021 is "Van Gogh," an APU that combines "Zen 2" CPU cores with an RDNA2 iGPU. Interestingly, "Cezanne," bound for the same year, has the opposite CPU+iGPU combination - a newer gen "Zen 3" CPU component, and an older gen "Vega" iGPU. The two chips could target different markets, looking at their I/O, with "Van Gogh" supporting LPDDR5 memory.

ASRock Launches AMD A520 Motherboards with Best In-class Features

The leading global motherboard manufacturer, ASRock, proudly introduce the new motherboard lineup for AMD A520 chipset, a new value solution to join the AMD 500 series family. The newly launched ASRock AMD A520 motherboards brought the support of latest AMD 3rd Gen Ryzen Desktop Processors along with stunning performance to the masses.

"At AMD, our goal is to provide every PC user with the most powerful, flexible and reliable user experience across all verticals," said Chris Kilburn, corporate vice president and general manager, client component business unit, AMD. "We are pleased to introduce the AMD A520 chipset, offering a robust platform for the award-winning 3rd Gen Ryzen Desktop Processors alongside a promise for future support of the upcoming "Zen 3" architecture. With creative designs in a range of form factors from Mini-ITX to full size Micro-ATX coupled with an abundance of connectivity options from our partners at ASRock, the A520 chipset will offer a streamlined and trusted platform to satisfy even the most demanding home and office PC users."

GIGABYTE Launches AMD A520 Chipset Motherboards

GIGABYTE TECHNOLOGY Co. Ltd, a leading manufacturer of motherboards, graphics cards, and hardware solutions, today announced the launch of AMD A520 chipset motherboards primed to unleash the potential of 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Desktop Processors and planned support for the next-gen Ryzen Desktop Processors. The GIGABYTE A520 motherboards are designed to deliver abundant functions to fulfill all kinds of needs for families and offices. From digital power design which provides the processors and chipset a stable power supplement, to GIGABYTE Ultra Durable technology, GIGABYTE A520 series motherboards deliver users the most delightful PC experience.

GIGABYTE A520 motherboards comprise AORUS and UD series, which provides various size options of ATX, Micro ATX, and the user-favorite mini ITX size in recent years. Enhanced by pure digital PWM components, GIGABYTE A520 motherboards deliver the promise of a stable power supply. The mini motherboard A520I AC which is specially designed for small systems equips Direct 6 Phases Digital VRM Solution with 55A DrMOS, allowing for ultimate performance with a stable and sufficient power supply when overclocking on 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Desktop Processors.

AMD "Cezanne" APU Spotted: Retains Renoir's iGPU, Updates CPU to "Zen 3"

AMD's 5th Generation Ryzen "Cezanne" APU sprung up on SiSoft SANDRA database, with big hints as to the areas where the company could innovate next. Apparently, "Cezanne" is a very similar silicon to "Renoir." It appears to feature the same iGPU solution, based on the "Vega" architecture. We're now learning that the iGPU even has the same core configuration, with up to 512 stream processors, and a likely bump in iGPU engine clocks over the Ryzen 4000 "Renoir" chips.

Much of the innovation is with the CPU component. Although the CPU core count is not yet known, the company is deploying its "Zen 3" microarchitecture, which sees all cores on the silicon sharing a large common slab of L3 cache. The "Vega" based iGPU should still perform better than the solution on "Renoir," as it's assisted by higher engine clocks, and possibly a higher IPC CPU component. In the SANDRA screenshot, the iGPU was shown bearing 1.85 GHz engine clocks, which amounts to a 100 MHz speed-bump compared to the engine clocks of the Ryzen 4000H and 4000U.
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