Monday, September 7th 2020

Intel Pentium Silver and Celeron "Jasper Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel is giving finishing touches to six new Pentium Silver and Celeron "Jasper Lake" entry-level processors. Built on the 10 nm silicon fabrication process, these processors leverage the "Tremont" CPU cores, or the "small" x86-64 cores Intel is deploying on its "Lakefield" Core Hybrid processors. The chips also feature a low-power trim of the company's Gen11 iGPU (same graphics architecture found in "Ice Lake-U" and "Lakefield" processors). The desktop SKUs consist of three parts with TDP rated at 10 W, while the three other mobile SKUs offer 6 W TDP.

The desktop lineup is led by the Pentium Silver J6005, a 4-core/4-thread part with 2.00 GHz clock speeds, up to 3.00 GHz "maximum quad-core burst speed," and 4 MB L2 cache. The Celeron J5105 is next in line, with 2.00 GHz clocks, 2.80 GHz burst speeds, a slightly slower iGPU, and 4 MB L2 cache. At the bottom end of the desktop lineup is the Celeron J4505, a 2-core/2-thread part clocked at 2.00 GHz with 2.90 GHz burst, and 4 MB L2 cache. The mobile lineup is led by the Pentium Silver N6000, a 4-core/4-thread part with 1.10 GHz clocks, 3.10 GHz burst speeds, and 4 MB L2 cache. The Celeron N5100 is right behind, clocked at 1.10 GHz and 2.80 GHz clocks. At the bottom of the stack is the Celeron N4500, a 2-core/2-thread part with 1.10 GHz base and 2.80 GHz burst.
An Intel video presentation on the "Tremont" CPU core architecture follows.

Source: FanlessTech
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11 Comments on Intel Pentium Silver and Celeron "Jasper Lake" Lineup Detailed

#1
Vayra86
Wow, its a fly over alright. In the literal sense of the word. Flashy black blocks and tron- lines with abbreviations.

What a complete and utter waste of time.
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#2
Chrispy_
Vayra86Wow, its a fly over alright. In the literal sense of the word. Flashy black blocks and tron- lines with abbreviations.

What a complete and utter waste of time.
That's a two minute video that could have been a single image.

Do we know yet how fast the Tremont cores are to previous-gen? Gemini Lake was up to 4C/4T at up to 3.2GHz and 18EU and I believe the Tremont cores in Sunny Cove are optimised for up to ~2GHz

I also remember seeing Intel slides saying that Tremont has 'up to 30% more IPC' than a Goldmont+ core of Gemini-Lake, which means that Intel have added some fixed-function shenanigans and that number is for a special niche application. There's no realistic way they can pull 30% higher INT/FP general compute IPC out of their ass anymore. So, realisically, let's say FP/INT IPC is 10% up on Goldmont, but clockspeeds are down almost 40% - that's not a win for consumers.
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#3
Fourstaff
Lets take a look at the performance per watt and performance per $$ to see if its good or non starter.
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#4
Chrispy_
FourstaffLets take a look at the performance per watt and performance per $$ to see if its good or non starter.
Performance/Watt should be up; They'll be a bit slower but a lot more efficient.
AMD aren't competing so hard in the netbook/ultra-budget laptop market any more so Intel has no incentive to offer good performance/$. If fact, I don't recall AMD replacing the ancient Beema/Mullins A-series (Bobcat derivatives) in the last half-decade.
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#5
watzupken
To be honest, there is nothing interesting here. Intel as usual don't like to make big improvements at all level. I believe the first quad core Atom got released around 2013, so 7 years later we are still in the quad core territory. Atom chips are decent for day to day usage, but they are generally pair with crappy hardware which impairs the experience. Even in today's context, you are more likely to find a Gemini Lake chip paired with a single channel of 4GB, with eMMC drive, and less likely to find 1 with 8GB RAM and a proper SSD drive. I have to admit these are cheap, but it limits the processor. I am not sure if Jasper Lake will change anything.
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#6
R0H1T
Chrispy_That's a two minute video that could have been a single image.

Do we know yet how fast the Tremont cores are to previous-gen? Gemini Lake was up to 4C/4T at up to 3.2GHz and 18EU and I believe the Tremont cores in Sunny Cove are optimised for up to ~2GHz

I also remember seeing Intel slides saying that Tremont has 'up to 30% more IPC' than a Goldmont+ core of Gemini-Lake, which means that Intel have added some fixed-function shenanigans and that number is for a special niche application. There's no realistic way they can pull 30% higher INT/FP general compute IPC out of their ass anymore. So, realisically, let's say FP/INT IPC is 10% up on Goldmont, but clockspeeds are down almost 40% - that's not a win for consumers.
You mean in Lakefield? Sunny Cove is for ICL cores, a uarch much like Tremont, so one is Core based the other plain old Atom.
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#7
Chrispy_
R0H1TYou mean in Lakefield? Sunny Cove is for ICL cores, a uarch much like Tremont, so one is Core based the other plain old Atom.
Sorry, I did mean Lakefield, I was getting my nomenclature confused.

I thought Lakefield was the CPU overall codename and it was comprised of one high-performance core (Sunny Cove, the same cores in IceLake) and four low-power Atom cores (Tremont)

These Jasper Lake CPUs are just the low-power Atom cores, without the high-performance Sunny Cove cores right?

So Jasper lake = 4x Tremont
Lakefield = 1x Sunny Cove + 4x Tremont.
Ice Lake = 4x Sunny Cove?
Posted on Reply
#9
londiste
Chrispy_I also remember seeing Intel slides saying that Tremont has 'up to 30% more IPC' than a Goldmont+ core of Gemini-Lake, which means that Intel have added some fixed-function shenanigans and that number is for a special niche application. There's no realistic way they can pull 30% higher INT/FP general compute IPC out of their ass anymore. So, realisically, let's say FP/INT IPC is 10% up on Goldmont, but clockspeeds are down almost 40% - that's not a win for consumers.
SPECInt/SPECfp usually isn't too shenanigan-y.
With the list of changes, 30% is believable enough.
How are clock speeds down 40%? The top of the line Goldmont Plus Atom is J5040 with 2GHz base and 3.2GHz boost clock. J6005 with 2GHz base and 3.0GHz boost is pretty close.
watzupkenTo be honest, there is nothing interesting here. Intel as usual don't like to make big improvements at all level. I believe the first quad core Atom got released around 2013, so 7 years later we are still in the quad core territory.
I would think the target market for desktop and mobile might really not need more than 4 cores.
How about 24 Tremont cores in P5962B? Previous generation had 16 cores in C3955.
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#10
GoldenX
rutra80Do they AVX?
You mad? Intel can't segment their own market if they do charity like that!

I would love to see how cool these little 6W chips are at full under a big water cooler. Just for the lulz.
Posted on Reply
#11
watzupken
londisteI would think the target market for desktop and mobile might really not need more than 4 cores.
How about 24 Tremont cores in P5962B? Previous generation had 16 cores in C3955.
I disagree. These low power chips could be very attractive and cost effective for most users and especially so if they get an upgrade in the number of cores. I am not looking at a steep increase in core, but bumping it up by 50% to 4 and 6 cores respectively can result in a decently powerful cheap laptop/PC and also fend off competition from ARM. In 2020, a 2 cores/ 2 threads processor is very lackluster product in my opinion. Rather I feel that Intel deliberately limited it so that it doesn't cannibalize sales of their more expensive models. The more they fear about cannibalizing their own product, the more they will lose out to competition because that fear is causing them to limit the growth of their own product.
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