Sunday, September 27th 2020

GELID Launches Slim Silence AM4 CPU Cooler

GELID Solutions have recently unveiled a new 1U low profile cooler for the AMD AM4 socket. The SLIM SILENCE AM4 is a product of GELID Solutions SILENT product line. The SLIM SILENCE AM4 is designed for HTPC, Panel PC, Car PC and 1U Server. The heatsink measures 28 mm tall and should suit most slim-type chassis. The SLIM SILENCE AM4 also comes with the double heatpipe integrated into the heatsink base and features multiple heatsink optimizations to achieve high cooling efficiency in the compact size. The cooler weighs 206 g to support enhanced compatibility with lightweight Panel PC and Car PC applications. The new silent 65 mm frameless fan with the intelligent GELID PWM (Pulse Width Module) compliments the heat sink. The intelligent PWM Curve technique constantly keeps it silent but accelerates speed whenever higher airflow is required. The SLIM SILENCE AM4 is compatible to AMD Ryzen 3/5/7 CPU with TDP up to 85 W and supports AM4 CPU Socket.
The cooler is RoHS and WEEE conform and carries a 5 year warranty. The SLIM SILENCE AM4 is now available for 22 USD / 19 Euro.
Source: GELID Solutions
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16 Comments on GELID Launches Slim Silence AM4 CPU Cooler

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
Might work for some APU's, but looks pretty weak
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#2
ExcuseMeWtf
It better be substantially quieter than stock solution, otherwise little point in that.
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#3
TheLostSwede
ExcuseMeWtf
It better be substantially quieter than stock solution, otherwise little point in that.
It's for low profile systems. Reading comprehension is a real thing...
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#4
ExcuseMeWtf
TheLostSwede
It's for low profile systems. Reading comprehension is a real thing...
Yeah, because stock AM4 Wraith cooler is a massive tower type heatsink...

/s
Posted on Reply
#5
ZoneDymo
ExcuseMeWtf
Yeah, because stock AM4 Wraith cooler is a massive tower type heatsink...

/s
no but it is about twice the height of this thing
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#7
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Im wondering if the heatpipes are a bit of a gimmick.
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#8
ymbaja
I’d actually be really interested to see how it compares to the stock cooler. Effective Thermal transfer within a solid block is a surprisingly short distance.
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#9
bonehead123
Nice design overall, kinda reminds me of some pre-486 era coolers. However, I would question it's actual performance in modern systems, LP/m-itx or otherwise, given that most chips nowadays run much faster & therefore generate alot moar heat when compared to older ones....

Waiting on reviews :)
Posted on Reply
#10
Valantar
FreedomEclipse
Im wondering if the heatpipes are a bit of a gimmick.
Definitely not - if they weren't there, the edges of this heatsink would barely be getting warm at all. It's probably the difference between this not working and being passable at middling power levels in 1U without server-style airflow.
Posted on Reply
#11
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Valantar
Definitely not - if they weren't there, the edges of this heatsink would barely be getting warm at all. It's probably the difference between this not working and being passable at middling power levels in 1U without server-style airflow.
Funny that. I dont remember heatsinks for the Skt 5/7/478 and AMD skt 462 days ever having their heatsinks suffer from 'barely be getting warm at all' syndrome. And 99% of those stock coolers never had heatpipes. It was just an aluminium block that had chunks cut out of it to make a fin array.
Posted on Reply
#12
Valantar
FreedomEclipse
Funny that. I dont remember heatsinks for the Skt 5/7/478 and AMD skt 462 days ever having their heatsinks suffer from 'barely be getting warm at all' syndrome. And 99% of those stock coolers never had heatpipes. It was just an aluminium block that had chunks cut out of it to make a fin array.
They were still pretty terrible though - if they got hot through the whole cooler, that was more down to it being bad than due to its excellent thermal transfer characteristics. I remember the "flower" cooler I had on my old Duron 800 - it definitely got hot, but again, not due to it being really good at spreading heat out. Admittedly it was also really tiny, but the CPU was also rated at 35W maximum... The thermal delta between the center of the heatsink and the outer edges would be significant for any design of this era. For a design like this Gelid one with the fan taking up the space of the fins directly on top of the die, adding heatpipes to ensure as much heat as possible is spread out to the outlying fins is likely a significant boost to its cooling capacity.
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#13
Bayfront Benny
I wonder if you could chop this thing into something for cooling m.2s? Remove fan > chop > replace fan
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#15
micropage7
make it around 100W TDP, so we have more room
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#16
Chrispy_
I'm surprised the aluminium fins run parallel to the heatpipes.

Much better design would be to have the fins tangential to the heatpipes, so that the heatpipes spread the heat out to all the fins. With the parallel design, the 8 fins above the heatpipes get great transfer from the CPU die, and the 20 fins on either side get nothing but pitiful aluminium conduction.
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