Monday, January 11th 2021

AMD WRX80 Threadripper PRO Platform Breaks From OEM Shackles, ASUS WS WRX80 SAGE Spotted

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3000 PRO line of ultra high-end processors with 8-channel DDR4 memory and 128-lane PCI-Express were a bit of a nothingburger for the DIY PC community as AMD made it exclusive to Lenovo for its ThinkStation P620 pre-built workstations. The hope for Threadripper PRO hitting the DIY scene increased in December 2020, with GIGABYTE unveiling a the WRX80 SU8, a motherboard sold in the open market, albeit designed mainly for servers and not workstations that are loaded with I/O. ASUS is about to change this.

Here's the first picture of the ASUS WS WRX80 SAGE, a no-holes-barred workstation motherboard based on the AMD WRX80 chipset, supporting Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3000 series processors. This board wires out each of the processor's eight memory channels to its own DIMM slot (1 DIMM per channel), and spreads the processor's lavish PCIe 4.0 lane budget among seven PCI-Express 4.0 x16 slots, three onboard (and possibly four by AIC) M.2 NVMe slots, a pair of U.2 NVMe slots, and I/O that very likely includes a pair of 10 GbE connections. Getting the board is the easy part. You'll need to hunt down a Ryzen Threadripper PRO sWRX80 processor, and a PSU that can feed the board's three 8-pin EPS, and two 6-pin PCIe, besides the 24-pin ATX.
Source: VideoCardz
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24 Comments on AMD WRX80 Threadripper PRO Platform Breaks From OEM Shackles, ASUS WS WRX80 SAGE Spotted

#2
bob3002
So what's the real differentiating factor between Threadripper Pro and Epyc at this point?

8-channel memory and 128 PCIe lanes were the differentiating factor between regular Threadripper (4 ch RAM, 64 PCIe lanes) and Epyc before, if I remember correctly. Why not just get an Epyc workstation?

I feel like I'm missing something.
Posted on Reply
#3
DeathtoGnomes
and a PSU that can feed the board's three 8-pin EPS, and two 6-pin PCIe, besides the 24-pin ATX.
do they make larger than 2kw PSUs for this kind of thing? :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#4
owen10578
bob3002So what's the real differentiating factor between Threadripper Pro and Epyc at this point?

8-channel memory and 128 PCIe lanes were the differentiating factor between regular Threadripper (4 ch RAM, 64 PCIe lanes) and Epyc before, if I remember correctly. Why not just get an Epyc workstation?

I feel like I'm missing something.
They're lower clocked and are more expensive? Also Epyc is more useful with being able to use more than one CPU per motherboard.
Posted on Reply
#5
DeathtoGnomes
bob3002So what's the real differentiating factor between Threadripper Pro and Epyc at this point?

8-channel memory and 128 PCIe lanes were the differentiating factor between regular Threadripper (4 ch RAM, 64 PCIe lanes) and Epyc before, if I remember correctly. Why not just get an Epyc workstation?

I feel like I'm missing something.
a few thousand dollars to start with. :p :D
Posted on Reply
#6
Aldain
bob3002So what's the real differentiating factor between Threadripper Pro and Epyc at this point?

8-channel memory and 128 PCIe lanes were the differentiating factor between regular Threadripper (4 ch RAM, 64 PCIe lanes) and Epyc before, if I remember correctly. Why not just get an Epyc workstation?

I feel like I'm missing something.
You are missing

24 hour seven days a week one the ground technical support
You are missing the fact that EPYC can not have almost ANY downtime
You are missing the fact that EPYC needs to be 99.999 percent UP..
Posted on Reply
#7
Chrispy_
bob3002So what's the real differentiating factor between Threadripper Pro and Epyc at this point?

8-channel memory and 128 PCIe lanes were the differentiating factor between regular Threadripper (4 ch RAM, 64 PCIe lanes) and Epyc before, if I remember correctly. Why not just get an Epyc workstation?

I feel like I'm missing something.
EPYC is basically designed for 2P servers (dual-socket use).

Sure, you can buy a 1P EPYC if you don't need all the cores. They're pretty much just Threadrippers tuned for the efficiency sweet spot instead of the performance sweet spot. Also, TR4 and SP3 sockets are incompatible, so if you want to use the features of a server board, you can't just buy a Threadripper.

In terms of pricing, there's almost no difference. List pricing for the EPYC 7702P is within 10% of the list pricing for a 3990X - both 64C single-socket Zen2.
Posted on Reply
#8
claylomax
DeathtoGnomesdo they make larger than 2kw PSUs for this kind of thing? :shadedshu:
You use two psu's for builds that need that kind of power.
Posted on Reply
#9
ebivan
What are these things?
Posted on Reply
#10
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
ebivanWhat are these things?
I believe those are PCIe clock buffers.
Posted on Reply
#11
Chrispy_
AquinusI believe those are PCIe clock buffers.
So they store time, like a flux capacitor? Neat!
Posted on Reply
#12
efikkan
Nice motherboard.

I only wish it didn't have that chipset fan.
Posted on Reply
#13
repman244
God damn, that's a good looking board with proper features and PCI-E lanes.
These kind of boards should of been made for TR from the start!
Posted on Reply
#15
InVasMani
efikkanNice motherboard.

I only wish it didn't have that chipset fan.
There are two actually the VRM has one tucked in there as well.
Posted on Reply
#16
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Chrispy_So they store time, like a flux capacitor? Neat!
I love the reference. :laugh:

In all seriousness, if they are buffers, they maintain the stability of whatever signals are going through them, be it the PCIe clock alone or any of the data lines. All signals degrade the further they travel which gets worse at higher frequencies and there may be crosstalk between the lanes, so this might be to buffer the signals to the slots furthest away from the CPU to prevent errors and maintain signal integrity. I've seen these on most motherboards with a lot of PCIe lanes.
Posted on Reply
#17
Chrispy_
efikkanNice motherboard.

I only wish it didn't have that chipset fan.
Al least AMD chipset fans never spin up as long as your case has reasonable airflow over the chipset heatsink.
I'd still just prefer a much bigger heatsink.
Posted on Reply
#19
mechtech
Chrispy_So they store time, like a flux capacitor? Neat!
Be carefull when approaching 88 mph!!!
Posted on Reply
#20
DeathtoGnomes
claylomaxYou use two psu's for builds that need that kind of power.
fully aware of that.
Posted on Reply
#21
tripleclicker
"Here's the first picture of the ASUS WS WRX80 SAGE, a no-holes-barred workstation..."

...no-holds-barred...

I'm just nitpicking.
Posted on Reply
#22
Caring1
tripleclicker...no-holds-barred...

I'm just nitpicking.
No holes barred sounds like a gay night club :roll:
Posted on Reply
#23
Chrispy_
Arc1t3ctThis board is beautiful!!
My only nit-pick would be to get rid of the mesh over the heatsinks. It serves no functional purpose and will probably hinder cooling by reducing airflow over the fins.

The reason this board is beautiful is because it's naked engineering, all function, no gimmicks - and the mesh cover is just about the only thing that isn't essential.
Posted on Reply
#24
kapone32
I actually like the way the CPU socket is oriented on this board. It would help with top mounted radiator clearance.
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