Monday, February 22nd 2021

Intel Core i7-11700 "Rocket Lake" Tested Some More: Competition for 5800X Firms Up

Odd Tech Reviews published a performance review of an Intel Core i7-11700 (non-K) "employee beta sample." This review comes on the heels of a Lab501.ro review of an unlocked i7-11700K engineering sample; and yet springs a different set of results in relation to the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X. The i7-11700 is shown having a slight edge over the 5800X in both the single- and multi-threaded tests of the CPU-Z Bench, where it's shown posting a 3.59% higher single-threaded score.

The Ryzen 7 5800X retakes the lead over the Core i7-11700 sample in Cinebench R15 and R20, posting higher scores in both the single- and multi-threaded tests. The 5800X also maintains lead with 7-Zip. Blender sees the i7-11700 once again run past the 5800X, but the AMD chip claws back with V-Ray and Handbrake video-encoding tests. There's a pitched battle between the 5800X and the i7-11700 with gaming, with each chip having an upper hand over the other, depending on the test. Find all these results and more in the Odd Tech Reviews presentation.
Source: HotHardware
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26 Comments on Intel Core i7-11700 "Rocket Lake" Tested Some More: Competition for 5800X Firms Up

#2
tabascosauz
Chip is running without power limits, so actual productivity benchmark numbers will probably be lower given the usually conservative PL2 for 65W parts. So for multi-core, looks like Ryzen keeps its productivity advantage against Cypress Cove at iso-corecount. Even so, it really doesn't look too shabby at all. Single core looks quite competitive and the 11700K probably will be about the same or a bit faster in ST.

At this point, as long as the single core performance is competitive, the only actually interesting things to see are the temperatures and pricing. If the rumored 11700 pricing is anything to go by, AMD might really feel the lack of a lower priced 65W 8-core in its Zen 3 lineup, if their stock situation doesn't drastically improve and they don't change their pricing structure.
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#3
Hyderz
hope there's plenty of supply from intel, its good time to be a gamer with both amd and intel cpus perform really well.
if only gamers can get their hands on gpus...
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#5
evernessince
If Intel prices these upcoming chips right they could have a good generation on their hands. At least from what the leaks have shown.
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#6
Why_Me
If someone is looking for a budget orientated plug & play gaming build then Intel is the way to go atm. On the flip side what's going to screw Intel bigly is the lack of gpu's. I'm guessing a lot new to PC gaming peeps will hold off on gaming builds.
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#7
ViperXTR
Nice, and the 11700K will be faster and OC.
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#8
harm9963
That 5800x is not right , my old 5800X , stock , at the time i had it was, on X470 to.
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#9
ViperXTR
harm9963
That 5800x is not right , my old 5800X , stock , at the time i had it was, on X470 to.
Now that you mentioned it, my score is something like that as well, was the review using slow ram perhaps?
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#10
harm9963
Had a 5800X for 45 days , went thru 6 BIOS updates , all benchmarks stay the same , cold days ,hot days , never seen scores that low for a 5800X . :)
tabascosauz
CPPC distribution of core quality differs for every chip, so logically achievable ST performance should vary. Vermeer seems better but AMD doesn't guarantee Core 0 quality. And CPU-Z doesn't give a shit about CPPC and only ever runs on Core 0 unlike Cinebench, so what you have in that core is what you get. There is no way to force it to run any other way - conceivably, there's someone out there with a less-than-lucky 5800X.

Other things I could think of would be AGESA boost algorithm (we have had a lot of AGESA lately), and the cooler (although despite being a hot chip, I don't think cooler is likely to impact single-thread performance on the 5800X).
www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/amd-ryzen-7-5800x-review,1.html
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#12
Legacy-ZA
ViperXTR
Now that you mentioned it, my score is something like that as well, was the review using slow ram perhaps?
Most likely, some folks love to skew the data. We all know Ryzen does very well with 3200Mhz+ CL14 or 16 modules.
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#14
chris.london
Those multicore 5800X scores are at least 10% lower than they should be.
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#15
B-Real
ViperXTR
Nice, and the 11700K will be faster and OC.
XD
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#16
DeathtoGnomes
evernessince
If Intel prices these upcoming chips right they could have a good generation on their hands. At least from what the leaks have shown.
I doubt Intel will price lower than AMD, considering Intels pricing history.
chris.london
Those multicore 5800X scores are at least 10% lower than they should be.
stock coolers will do that.
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#17
napata
DeathtoGnomes
I doubt Intel will price lower than AMD, considering Intels pricing history.


stock coolers will do that.
History tells me that Intel generally sticks with their pricing structure so right now that means they will be undercutting AMD. The reason for is this is simply because Intel is releasing a full product stack while AMD only has their expensive skus out right now. The 11700 & 11700k will certainly be cheaper than the 5800x, while the 11900k won't be.

Even now they're undercutting AMD with Comet Lake: 10400F at 125€ vs 3600 at 200€ for example.
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#19
SDimmu
My 5800x scores 6730 points con multi and 660 single without pbo or co setttings..
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#20
harm9963
DeathtoGnomes
I doubt Intel will price lower than AMD, considering Intels pricing history.


stock coolers will do that.
5800X do not come with a stock cooler , and CPUZ single tread test is not that stressful at all , most likely slow RAM
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#21
Makaveli
SDimmu
My 5800x scores 6730 points con multi and 660 single without pbo or co setttings..
Yup their numbers are low.

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#22
Chrispy_
tabascosauz
Chip is running without power limits, so actual productivity benchmark numbers will probably be lower given the usually conservative PL2 for 65W parts. So for multi-core, looks like Ryzen keeps its productivity advantage against Cypress Cove at iso-corecount. Even so, it really doesn't look too shabby at all. Single core looks quite competitive and the 11700K probably will be about the same or a bit faster in ST.

At this point, as long as the single core performance is competitive, the only actually interesting things to see are the temperatures and pricing. If the rumored 11700 pricing is anything to go by, AMD might really feel the lack of a lower priced 65W 8-core in its Zen 3 lineup, if their stock situation doesn't drastically improve and they don't change their pricing structure.
Waiting to see what Intel does is likely why AMD hasn't released a 5700X and vanilla 5600 yet.
In their shoes, I'd do the same thing....

Also, to jump on the "those aren't valid 5800X scores" with my slow-ass CL18 RAM and PBO disabled, using a near-silent air cooler locked at just 1100RPM:


A proper 5800X build would use 16GB or 32GB of B-die to get CL16, cool it better and enable PBO - since that's far closer to "default"
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#23
yotano211
DeathtoGnomes
I doubt Intel will price lower than AMD, considering Intels pricing history.


stock coolers will do that.
5800x has no stock cooler
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#24
md2003
Looks somehow relevant, so here is my post: that is what a 10700 can achieve oc'ed with 4000 cl15 rams. Upgrade can wait for ddr5 to become mainstream, heck i was ok with my 4790k oc'ed too.
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#25
moob
I'm just gonna jump on that, "that's a questionable benchmark" bandwagon as well. This was with PBO disabled and using F4-3600C16D-32GTZNC:
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