Tuesday, March 9th 2021

Intel Prepares 19 Alder Lake Processors for Laptops Ranging from 5-55 Watts

As we are getting closer to the launch of Intel's next-generation Alder Lake processors, more information is getting leaked. Today, thanks to the leaked presentation slide, we have some more details regarding Intel's Alder Lake offerings in the laptop sector. As a reminder, Alder Lake uses a hybrid approach to core configuration with the similar mindset Arm's big.LITTLE works. There are a few smaller cores for processing smaller tasks that don't need much power and, of course, there are a few big cores that are used for heavyweight processing as some advanced applications require. The small cores are going to be based on the Gracemont microarchitecture, while the big one will use the Golden Cove design.

Thanks to @9550pro on Twitter, we have a slide that showcases 19 different Alder Lake configurations for the laptop segment. At the very bottom, there are configurations with a TDP of just five Watts. That is achieved by having just one big, four smaller cores, 48 EU Gen 12 GPU and that is meant for the tablet segment. Going up, we have different ranges depending on the application device, and the highest end is a chip with 55 Watts of power. That model has eight small and eight big cores, combined with 32 EUs of Gen 12 graphics. All models include integrated graphics. The variations of big and small cores have allowed Intel to have as many as 19 different SKUs, that cover every segment needed, by simply balancing the core count. You can check out the rest of the models below for yourself.
Intel Alder Lake Intel Alder Lake Mobile Configurations
Source: @9550pro (Twitter)
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22 Comments on Intel Prepares 19 Alder Lake Processors for Laptops Ranging from 5-55 Watts

#1
deu
Without researching it to the bottom: is it really necessary with 19 different SKUs for on series even laptops only!?? It seems that Intels tactics when it comes to laptops is to confuse and deflect. No wonder they need five digits to name them! :D Transparency to the buyer is what im looking for!
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#2
Anymal
By Xiaomi playbook.
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#3
dont whant to set it"'
So it's even harder to choose one, thanks for the complicated stack of products Intel.
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#4
londiste
deuWithout researching it to the bottom: is it really necessary with 19 different SKUs for on series even laptops only!?? It seems that Intels tactics when it comes to laptops is to confuse and deflect. No wonder they need five digits to name them! :D Transparency to the buyer is what im looking for!
For comparison, Ryzen 5000 has 14 SKUs for 10-54W range.
According to the image, Intel has 11(13). Not sure what exactly the dashed line SKUs are, "maybe" I suppose.
M-package SKUs are really for a different segment.
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#5
1d10t
With 1+4 core config for low end tablet, how Intel gonna win that over Dimensity 1200 with 1+3+4? Atom X7 4c4t need significant upgrade and yet we got another "incremental".
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#7
Mats
deuWithout researching it to the bottom: is it really necessary with 19 different SKUs for on series even laptops only!?? It seems that Intels tactics when it comes to laptops is to confuse and deflect. No wonder they need five digits to name them! :D Transparency to the buyer is what im looking for!
In 2013 it was 41, or 54 if you include Pentium and Celeron, so 19 isn't much.

ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/codename/29902/ivy-bridge.html#@Mobile
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#8
yeeeeman
dont whant to set it'So it's even harder to choose one, thanks for the complicated stack of products Intel.
if this is hard how about the ryzen 5700u being a zen 2 cpu and 5800u being a zen 3? it is easy to judge
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#9
Darmok N Jalad
dont whant to set it'So it's even harder to choose one, thanks for the complicated stack of products Intel.
It's more like you'll find the laptop you like, but it may not have the CPU you were hoping for. It's like when OEMs ship AMD laptops with single-channel memory. Or they save $25 by going with a cheap LCD panel. Product differentiation by castration.
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#10
Mats
dont whant to set it'So it's even harder to choose one, thanks for the complicated stack of products Intel.
What do you mean? It's been like this forever. Every laptop model sold will most likely be sold with only SKU's from one or two of the six columns, all depending on laptop size and cooling capacity.
You won't find 5/9/15 W CPU's in regular sized gaming laptops, and no 45/55 W in ultrabooks. Also, THREE different packages.

I'm surprised that the 15 W variants only have 2C/8c (only 2 big cores), while AMD have had 8 (big) for a year now.
This makes me even more curious about how Alder lake will perform, as I don't think Intel chose that configuration by accident. :D
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#12
HansRapad
Funny to see many people think that this is a very bad move or crappy move


in fact having a huge SKU mean expect a wide array of form factor

interesting how this is play out
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#13
ThrashZone
Hi,
Big cores, little cores, sounds funny.
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#15
Max(IT)
They need something to divert the attention from the embarrassing Rocket Lake launch /s
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#16
ZoneDymo
HansRapadFunny to see many people think that this is a very bad move or crappy move


in fact having a huge SKU mean expect a wide array of form factor

interesting how this is play out
Can you think of 19 form factors that all need a special personal cpu design? Because I sure as hell can't
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#17
voltage
its about damn time. it took almost 6 years of delays to bring alder lake series. good that intel finally rid that horrible previous ceo, the one before the last who spent his days getting his noddle wet rather than working.
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#18
Mats
ZoneDymoCan you think of 19 form factors that all need a special personal cpu design? Because I sure as hell can't
Why is everyone complaining about 19 SKU's? :confused: About three for each form factor.


19 is far from a record..

Comet Lake & Ice Lake: 19 + 12 mobile SKU's

Kaby Lake: 29 mobile SKU's

Ivy Bridge: 41 mobile SKU's
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#19
deu
londisteFor comparison, Ryzen 5000 has 14 SKUs for 10-54W range.
According to the image, Intel has 11(13). Not sure what exactly the dashed line SKUs are, "maybe" I suppose.
M-package SKUs are really for a different segment.
Just to clarify: im not after one of the two; both schemes are equally non-transparent. It is created to confuse mainstreamusers
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#20
Mats
deuIt is created to confuse mainstreamusers
No it isn't. They need more than one model for each product category. Three per category, or form factor, isn't bad.
IIRC, the confusion it creates actually lowers sales, to some degree.
Besides, the consumers will never see all these CPU's lined up like this in one pic when buying a laptop.

Also, don't forget that Alder Lake is replacing THREE code names from 2020: Lakefield, Tiger Lake, and Comet Lake. The fact that they will be all in one now is a bit of an indication that Alder Lake is quite efficient (NOT PROOF, I know).

Every time Intel needs a separate CPU for Laptops you know it can only get better. I'm thinking of when P4/PD was on desktop, while PM/CD was on mobile.
Half a year later, everything was C2D.
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#21
deu
MatsNo it isn't. They need more than one model for each product category. Three per category, or form factor, isn't bad.
IIRC, the confusion it creates actually lowers sales, to some degree.
Besides, the consumers will never see all these CPU's lined up like this in one pic when buying a laptop.

Also, don't forget that Alder Lake is replacing THREE code names from 2020: Lakefield, Tiger Lake, and Comet Lake. The fact that they will be all in one now is a bit of an indication that Alder Lake is quite efficient (NOT PROOF, I know).

Every time Intel needs a separate CPU for Laptops you know it can only get better. I'm thinking of when P4/PD was on desktop, while PM/CD was on mobile.
Half a year later, everything was C2D.
I see your points but I still see justification for mine too :0 : Less is more. Right now intels game benifits from confusion since they are trailing behind. Ill give that this is better classification than before but still way too many options (that as you point out), deters the user from buying in some cases (or let then in the hands of greedy low-tier salesmen! :0
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#22
micropage7
deuWithout researching it to the bottom: is it really necessary with 19 different SKUs for on series even laptops only!?? It seems that Intels tactics when it comes to laptops is to confuse and deflect. No wonder they need five digits to name them! :D Transparency to the buyer is what im looking for!
yea, they poisoning the consumer with many stuff at the same time, where the seller may say you need to add little bit more to have better performance to order the higher and more expensive processor that consumer may not need
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